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Archive through May 19, 2002

Sepulchritude Forum » The Absinthe Forum Archive thru June 2002 » Archive Thru May 2002 » Film Forum » Archive through May 19, 2002 « Previous Next »

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Anatomist
Posted on Sunday, May 19, 2002 - 10:02 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I used to skip class and stay home to do bong hits and watch THE FUGITIVE in reruns. I was disappointed in the movie. It was OK as an action deal I suppose. The problem is that the premise just doesn't make sense in the age of CNN, the net, cell phones, satellites, etc... Jones' performance was the only thing exceptional about the movie. He also seriously freaked me out in EXECUTIONER'S SONG. He's a compelling actor, it's just too bad he doesn't choose some riskier roles with smaller paychecks for the sake of quality.

K.
Verawench
Posted on Sunday, May 19, 2002 - 9:47 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Businessman or whore, I used to watch "The Fugitive" obsessively and revel in TLJ's stunning performance. It was the first time I was actually tolerant of take-charge masculinity.

"Newman?"
"Yes sir?"
"What are you doing?"
"I'm thinking"
"Well think me up a cup of coffee and a chocolate donut with some of those little sprinkles on top, come on, get thinkin'"
Marccampbell
Posted on Sunday, May 19, 2002 - 9:47 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

THE APOSTLE is a terrific film.
Anatomist
Posted on Sunday, May 19, 2002 - 8:02 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

All the interviews I've ever seen with TLJ indicate that acting is just a job for him that pays money. I was pissed that he didn't reprise his best role as Captain Woodrow Call in LONESOME DOVE, for the much more dour, gritty sequel: STREETS OF LAREDO. Instead they got James Garner, who just ain't Captain Call material. Problem is, STREETS was just a made for TV movie, and Jones was out of their price range at that time.

By contrast, I saw Robert Duval in an interview. They asked him about LONESOME DOVE and his face lit up. He said reverently that it (Capt. Augustus McCrae) was the best role he ever had in his life, and roles like that don't grow on trees. He was on the show promoting THE APOSTLE, a movie he wrote and tried to get made for something like a decade. He finally ended up doing the whole movie himself, risking several million dollars of his own money to finance it.

There's a big difference between an artist and a businessman... or whore, depending on your terminology.

K.
Robertsmith
Posted on Sunday, May 19, 2002 - 7:31 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

BTW, Men in Black 2 received 25 million a piece from Burger King and Sprint PCS for specific product placements and to have the rights to give out MIB2 toys w/ whoppers. There's also direct mentions of Mountain Dew, Entertainment Weekly, Sony Playstation (sony is producing the picture), and Tivo in the film. I would put the blame for all this squarely on the actors shoulders. Tommy Lee supposedly took home $20 million, and Michael Jackson got $15 million for a 15 second cameo. Will smith also got $20 million. What are these guys, baseball players? That's $55 million just for the actors! The studio doesn't have much choice but to accept massive corporate sponsorship to pay the insanely unreasonable salaries these actors were demanding. By contrast, the Coens recent "The Man Who Wasn't There" was made for $2 million. We could rebuild the entire country of Afghanistan for less than what it cost to make Men in Black 2,
Nascentvirion
Posted on Sunday, May 19, 2002 - 6:30 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

The Last Temptation of Christ is one of my all time favorite films. American Psycho is another, killing people while listening to Huey Lewis and the News & Phil Collins. Doesnt get any more artistic than that.
Anatomist
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 11:47 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

He ended up as more of a sad, twisted loser than the ones he played on film. It's like something by Sophocles.
Pikkle
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 11:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Oh, any article on Mickey O'Rourke's got to be a good one...
Anatomist
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 10:53 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Looking at imdb, it looks like O'Toole worked mostly in television starting in the 90s. A few years ago, I saw a good made for Showtime drama with her, Gina Gershon, and Griffin Dunne calle LOVE MATTERS. At one time, I rented VHS at a grocery store, and they had a lot of sleepier movies that were made for cable.

Speaking of "whatever happened to", I thought this article on Mickey Rourke was very interesting: http://www.salon.com/ent/feature/2002/05/15/rourke/index.html

K.
Marccampbell
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 10:18 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

anatomist,

Burton does a fine job of directing smaller films like BEETLEJUICE, SLEEPY HOLLOW, PEE WEE'S BIG ADVENTURE,
EDWARD SCISSORHANDS and ED WOOD. He does a shitty job when he tries to tackle epics ie. PLANET OF THE APES and BATMAN 1 & 2.
Marccampbell
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 10:16 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

what ever happened to Annette O' Toole?
She was so good in 48 HRS.
Anatomist
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 10:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

"Now, if only Tim Burton would return to top form..."

The easiest way to do this would be to demote him to the position of art and design director. His problem is that his ass just can't quite fill up that director's chair.

One of my favorite Tommy Lee Jones performances was in a little-seen made for TV movie called BROKEN VOWS (1987), with Annette O'Toole. It's one of those priest-blows-it-with-God-to-make-love-to-a-redhead stories, but he's incredible in it. Hmmm... given the story line, don't look for it on cable anytime soon.

K.
Marccampbell
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 9:31 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

btw, I liked SLEEPY HOLLOW.
Marccampbell
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 9:30 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

well vera, I would agree that the directors you mentioned are doing very good work and it may be a golden age artwise.. But, as far as making money goes,
the only director you mentioned thathas made the studios any substantial money is Jackson.Fincher's FIGHT CLUB a financial bomb.
And the Coen Brothers have never had a blockbuster hit.
Verawench
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 9:21 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

We never realize these things until they've passed, but I believe this is the golden age of cinema. I can name a dozen brilliant directors off the top of my head. Not only are people like David Fincher and Peter Jackson and the Coen Brothers getting the support of big studios, but their movies become mainstream box office hits as well.

Now, if only Tim Burton would return to top form...

Meanwhile, among upcoming movies, I'm looking forward to CQ; Pumpkin; Cherish; Frida... and yes, I will go see Men in Black II. I used to have a thing for Tommy Lee Jones. Ivy League educated good ol' boy. Oh hell yes.
Pikkle
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 7:23 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

BEEP BEEP!
Admin
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 7:05 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post


Quote:

I wonder if the presence of absinthe in FROM HELL and MOULIN ROUGE has increased absinthe sales.



it has certainly increased my traffic here. which has tripled since the Moulin Rouge opening. La Fee Verte now surpasses Pornokrates.com in traffic.
Marccampbell
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 6:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Evidence that art still exists in the cinema:

Y TU MAMA TAMBIEN, AMORES PERROS, THE LORD OF THE RINGS, FIGHT CLUB, GHOST WORLD, DONNIE DARKO,
MULLHOLLAND DR., MOULIN ROUGE, BREAKING THE WAVES, DANCER IN THE DARK, MAGNOLIA, THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS, PULP FICTION, SECRETS AND LIES, NAKED...

to name a few
Anatomist
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 6:18 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Crowlyman,

I think your analysis is overly simplistic. By your logic the only authentic art is pure self-indulgent masturbation with no thought given to an audience whatsoever. All art and entertainment forms have a component of communication betweent the makers and the intended audience. This relationship can't always be characterized as money-grubbing, pandering, or whoring. However, when the toys, t-shirts, BurgerKing theme cups, etc... are released before the actual movie is, the fundamental nature of the relationship is pretty clear...

K.
Marccampbell
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 6:15 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

yes, how could i have forgotten BLADE RUNNER, a visionary masterpiece.

also:

DAWN OF THE DEAD, THE QUARTERMASS films, TETSUO,
EYES WITHOUT A FACE, RABID, SHIVERS
Anatomist
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 6:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Not a bad list, Marc, but you left out the best sci-fi movie of them all: BLADE RUNNER (without the voiceovers). The mood, the atmosphere, the look... Rutger Hauer's "tears in rain" speech and cat and mouse stuff at the end... Other significants left out, which I consider great sci-fi: BRAZIL, THE QUIET EARTH, NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD (the old one and especially the remake), and most of the original STAR TREK series.

K.
Crowlyman
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 6:07 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

"The current incarnations of STAR WARS have about as much to do with the irrational wonder and amazement of childhood as Disneyland does: that kind of talk is just well-crafted propaganda put out to push entertainment-machine pablum that is the absolute antithesis of real imagination, wonder, and amazement."

Isnt that what most major films are about to begin with? Even the 'personal' indie films have to follow that line. The makers of such movies know that if it flops they don't get any more $$$ for their next project. Anyway, they market that type of film to indie type. Just as the big studios market their films to the infantile senses, the indies market to opposite sensabilities...Any way you cut the shit, it's still shit. Some just might look (or sound or act or feel) prettier than others is all.
Thegreenimp
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 6:06 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I've had a few people at a couple of parties say they saw Absinthe in Moulin Rouge,& From Hell,..... I just hope it hasn't increased the sale of kitchen matches.
Marccampbell
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 6:03 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I wonder if the presence of absinthe in FROM HELL and MOULIN ROUGE has increased absinthe sales.
Thegreenimp
Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2002 - 6:01 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wait till some studio gets paid to place a bottle of modern Absinthe in a film........then the fun begins.

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