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Archive through June 11, 2002

Sepulchritude Forum » The Absinthe Forum Archive thru January 2003 » The Monkey Hole » The After Hours Lounge » Archive through June 11, 2002 « Previous Next »

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Dr_Ordinaire
Posted on Tuesday, June 11, 2002 - 12:10 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

At 17 Bradbury's "The Martian Chronicles"

At 18 Chesterton's "The Ball and the Cross" (Go back five steps)

At 25 Mujica Lainez' "De Milagros y de Melancolias"

In between (many books, no passion)

At 45 Dale Pendell's "Pharmako-Poeia"
Mr_Carfax
Posted on Tuesday, June 11, 2002 - 12:00 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

THE ILLUMINATUS TRILOGY- Robert Anton Wilson and Robert Shea

- rewired my brain for the better

and

FOUCAULT'S PENDULUM- Umberto Ecco

- One can never belong to too many secret societies I say. Might be a better chance of being on the winning side.
Larsbogart
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 10:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Lester Grinspoon...
I had to see Lester once, on the couch. He was shrinking someone on a case and I was involved with his client. [not John Lennon]
Naturally, it was all my fault this person turned to a life of crime, and there was already a book on me before I went in and tried to lie.
Lester could shift focus in the courtroom by raising an eyebrow and you were lucky if your lawyer could get Lester to see you, even at his hourly rate.
Anatomist
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 7:29 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

STILL LIFE WITH WOODPECKER Tom Robbins
DIARY OF A DRUG FIEND Aleister Crowley
BEEN DOWN SO LONG Farina
PSYCHEDELIC DRUGS RECONSIDERED Lester Grinspoon
NAUSEA Jean Paul Sartre
BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE Dee Brown
DUNE (all six) Frank Herbert
LORD OF THE RINGS Tolkein
HOUSEKEEPING Marilynne Robinson
PLANET OF THE BLIND Stephen Kuusisto
DEAD MAN'S WALK
COMMANCHE MOON
LONESOME DOVE
STREETS OF LAREDO Larry McMurtry
CLAY'S ARK
LILLITH'S BROOD
PARABLE OF THE SOWER
PARABLE OF THE TALENTS Octavia Butler
Nolamour
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 7:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

The Road Less Traveled, Peck
The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success, Chopra
and, of course, Green Eggs and Ham, Seuss

OK, I was going to say
Penthouse...
Hustler...
But, I seem to remember they are magazines.

They all changed the way I think.
Anatomist
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 7:12 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I recently burglarized my dentist. In addition to a cabinet full of great drugs and some awesome B&D toys, I've got more back issues of HIGHLIGHTS than I know what to do with...

K.
Marccampbell
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 7:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

NO ONE HERE GETS OUT ALIVE effected me pretty in the same way it did anatomist. Its right up there with
FEAR AND LOATHING IN LAS VEGAS and EDIE.

Some other counter culture classics:
NAKED LUNCH Burroughs
THE FAMILY Ed Sanders
HOWL Ginsberg
MEMOIRS OF A BEATNIK Diane Di Prima
IN WATERMELON SUGAR Richard Brautigan
BEEN DOWN SO LONG IT LOOKS LIKE UP TO ME
Richard Farina
BEAUTIFUL LOSERS Leonard Cohen
METASEX MANIFESTOS Marco Vassi
SOUL ON ICE Eldridge Cleaver
Traineraz
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 6:58 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Siddhartha was intriguing, as well, and Journey to the East is very Masonish. (Herman Hesse)
Marccampbell
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 6:48 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

A few terrific books I've read recently:

GOD IS A BULLET - Boston Teran.
Puts the hard in hard-boiled. Hammet
meets Burroughs in a rock and roll punk noir.

FREEZER BURN - Joe R. Lansdale
Lansdale is a redneck Raymond Chandler who combines detective fiction with Eerie Comics pulp.

THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL - Hollywood scandals of the '50s. Reads like a combination of James Ellroy
and Kenneth Anger. Juicy stuff. Sex, drugs and suicide.

WETBONES - John Shirley
Shirley's the dude who put the punk into cyber punk. Dark horror with a hi-tech veneer.
Barsnake
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 4:54 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Steppenwolf - I swear to god herman hesse was writing about my father...
Anatomist
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 4:32 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

NO ONE HERE GETS OUT ALIVE, the hypey Jim Morrison biography. Read it when I was about 15, around the same time I started taking acid, smoking dope, and drinking. I really dug the anarchic, brainiac, asshole spirit of the rock hero, as portrayed, and through much intoxication and Doors listening, he came to seem like a spirit guide. I checked out, bought or stole every single book that was referenced or even mentioned in passing in the book, which led to my discovery of TWILIGHT OF THE IDOLS, by Friedrich Nietzsche and ON THE ROAD, which quickly gave way to THE DHARMA BUMS and THE SUBTERRANEANS. There are plenty of other books that I find more important and worthwhile now, but that one precipitated/accompanied the biggest life change.

K.
Traineraz
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 4:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

But on a more serious note, "Buddhism: A Way of Life and Thought" by Nancy Wilson Ross is quite informative. I've given it to a couple of friends. :)
Traineraz
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 4:05 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My life is currently being changed by "The Book of the Subgenius," but if you want something REALLY weird, try "Diuretics," by El Con Hubcap. He's the founder of the Church of Muppetology.

There's another, something like the Book of Urtaria (but I have that word spelled wrong), it's 2,000 pages, and available in its entirety online. Someone dropped a copy on my foot. Now I walk with a limp. Talk about life-changing.
Albertcamus
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 4:05 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

"Beyond Good and Evil" changed my life.and then after that Hustler magazine changed my life again.after that the "phone book" had the same effect..
_Blackjack
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 3:52 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Let me tell you about a book which changed my life. It's called The Book of Mormon...
Pikkle
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 3:49 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

"The Production and Use of Vegatable Oils in Ptolemaic Egypt."
Verawench
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 2:35 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

"Master and Margarita".
Baz
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 2:34 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

perhaps I'm posting too late, but

Spoon River Anthology. A book written from the point of view of the people that died in a small town made me realize, for the first time it really hit me, that life is fleeting. I've seen most of the world (on a shoestring) since then, and I truly think that book is why. What's strange is that it's such a simple book, just poems written by the people in the graveyard.
Pikkle
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 2:39 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

speak little, say much...
Marccampbell
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 2:16 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

pikkle,

you have a wonderful ability to tell an entire story in one sentence.
Gettingsane
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 2:08 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

ARE YOU ALIVE

NO

GETTING SANE

THAT YOU KNOW SO

SO OUT THERE
Pikkle
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 1:39 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

The book that changed my life? TV Guide... it took my father away from me, that's for sure...
Tortainglese
Posted on Monday, June 10, 2002 - 1:03 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Marc, that is quite a story, like a movie

influencial books in order of appearance:

Brideshead Revisited
Little Birds
The Sheltering Sky
molto agitato
Marccampbell
Posted on Sunday, June 9, 2002 - 3:12 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

The year was 1966. I was in my first year of high school. 15 years old. Falls Church, Virginia.
I was sick in bed with mononucleosis, a teenage illness that laid me out for 6 weeks. There was a strange girl that lived in my neighborhood. She had long straight black hair, olive skin, and dark brown eyes that could cut through diamond.
She lived in a big ramshackle house up the block. Her older brother was rumored to be a dealer of psychedelic drugs. Her parents were artists. The girls name was Carla Bombere. When I look back on those days, I realize she was the first hippie
I'd ever met. Though, she looked more like a Jewish beatnik. Carla and I barely knew each other, so I was surprised when she visited me while I was sick. I think she had sussed me out as being a kindred spirit. She saw something in me that I had yet to see in myself. She came bearing a book and a record album. The book was
Jack Kerouac's ON THE ROAD. The album was a recording of Allen Ginsberg reading KADDISH.
Carla's gifts were the catalyst that changed my life. I devoured ON THE ROAD. I listened to KADDISH over and over again. The book and the record opened up whole new worlds. But, more importantly, they made me WANT TO LIVE. To live fully, without fear, without guilt. To go out and experience life with eyes and heart open. And as soon as I got over my illness, thats what I did.
I dropped out of school. I gathered together a duffle bag of essentials: some clothes, a few books, and a baggie full of pot. I walked to the nearest freeway on-ramp and stuck out my thumb.
3 days later I was standing on Haight Street.
My life was just beginning.
Marccampbell
Posted on Sunday, June 9, 2002 - 2:51 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

The AFTER HOURS LOUNGE opens at 2 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, USA. Thats 5 A.M. Eastern Standard Time. For our friends in Europe, you figure it out.

Tonight's topic:
THE BOOK THAT CHANGED YOUR LIFE.

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