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Archive through August 19, 2002

Sepulchritude Forum » The Absinthe Forum Archive thru January 2003 » Strictly Absinthe & Collectibles » Emile » Archive through August 19, 2002 « Previous Next »

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Traineraz
Posted on Monday, August 19, 2002 - 2:20 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My new absinthe fountain is a "Pur" water filter pitcher which lives in the refrigerator. Costs less than spring water. :)
Wolfgang
Posted on Monday, August 19, 2002 - 12:27 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Spring water ice cubes... At the price of absinthe today, I don`t mind paying a very little extra for spring water...
Petermarc
Posted on Monday, August 19, 2002 - 9:50 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

almost impossible to find decent calcium removal products in france...plus, parisian calcium is downright nasty...you can see it falling out of ice cubes as they melt in your drink...
Wolfgang
Posted on Monday, August 19, 2002 - 9:09 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Calcium ---> CLR (or other similar cleaning products)
Crosby
Posted on Friday, August 16, 2002 - 7:33 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

The guy has a whole wad of spoons connected by wire through the holes. His prices are unreal, I don't think he really wants to sell any. In fact Peter doesn't think he's sold one since he's been going there. We saw some glasses that would have been cool if they weren't covered in calcium scum.
Chevalier
Posted on Friday, August 16, 2002 - 3:59 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Huh? Please tell us more ...
Petermarc
Posted on Friday, August 16, 2002 - 2:58 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

it's hit-and-miss...he did get the chance to see the world's largest rare absinthe-spoons ball...
unfortunately, the guy who's selling them is on drugs...
Chevalier
Posted on Friday, August 16, 2002 - 12:16 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Naw, Crosby's cool. Although I DID predict that he wouldn't have much success with the Paris flea markets.
Pikkle
Posted on Friday, August 16, 2002 - 11:24 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

If the absinthe ain't great, you must character assassinate!
Chevalier
Posted on Friday, August 16, 2002 - 7:14 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes, you're right, I meant to write "Emile". Thanks for pointing it out :-)
Crosby
Posted on Friday, August 16, 2002 - 7:10 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

No, neither does the Emile.
Chevalier
Posted on Friday, August 16, 2002 - 7:03 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

But Crosby, does your bottle of Emile 68 have any kind of unpleasant odor? After all, there are plenty of bad smells that aren't necessarily "fishy".
Crosby
Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2002 - 7:42 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I'm curious about the base alcohol too. Both the 68 and 45 versions give me a bad hangover when I over indulge. I never seem to get hangovers from other absinthe's. The Emile68 is still my favorite commercial brand though and I definitely don't smell fish.
Pikkle
Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2002 - 6:12 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I complain about everything, no matter how much I like it... it's all that German in me! Then again, maybe I should be more like you and just lie down and take it...
_Blackjack
Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2002 - 5:44 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Y'know, Pikkle, you sure complain a lot about it, considering how much of it you seem to be drinking...
Pikkle
Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2002 - 10:37 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

It's hard attempting to detect what's in there at all if all you can taste is someone's sad attempt at mixing a bunch of leaves with miscued potcheen...
Wolfgang
Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2002 - 10:16 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I guess the pikkle have been wasted at the NY GT... But we now have a more knowledgeable pikkle among us!


"a conflict going on between the alcohol and the herbs"

Exactly. The big question is what would happen with extra aging and how long will it take to smooth out the edges and ends up with a perfectly blended product.

I would like to know when did they distil my bottle. If it's no more than a month ago, there's still some hope it will become better with extra aging (in a year or so).

I would also like to know if the distillate is perfectly clear when it comes out of the still at the end of the heart or if some yellowish teint is accepted and included in the final product...

*refraining from writing too much, huuuurrgggg! *

About the fishy taste and smell...

I checked back Ted's review and he said "Following right behind is a background mix of distinctively darker lacquer notes. "

I now think those "lacquer notes" comes from the high harsh alcohol and the fennel. After all, some people use fennel to cook fish...

Of course, it's always very difficult to analyse absinthe when you have no idea what's in there. I may be completely wrong. This is just my humble babbling.
Pikkle
Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2002 - 7:06 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sampling and regularly consuming are two different things... but what credibility does an alcoholic have anyway? Sampler wins...

I was drinking Francois Guy next to Emile 68 last night... got through about three of each before barely finding my way to a non-floor level surface.
Now I usually drink about a 3:1 ratio with almost all my absinthes, can't do this with the Emile, the alcohol overwhelms everything. And really, what type of alcohol is it distilled from? I have to say, there is even with water a peculur acridity to the base of the drink (no, not the fish smell!) that overwhelms any other aroma that can barely punch through, even at a 5:1 ratio.
I can say that the F. Guy stand alone at 3:1 is much sweeter albeit simpler than the Emile at 5:1 and much more of the herbal essence comes through though in my view it lacks the complexity of some of the better hogsmacks and la bleues I've sampled while in the Emile, there seems to be a conflict going on between the alcohol and the herbs. For me it does not make much sense to dillute more than 5:1 with any product and having to do so makes it not worthwhile to consume.
I like both products alot relatively speaking but I have to say side by side, I'd have to go with the F. Guy for now, because if I wanted just flavored alcohol, I'd be better off with drinking some malt beverage concoction than having the buds battling whatever type of alcohol they use in Emile.
Absinthedrinker
Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2002 - 6:35 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

well actually he received a bottle of 68 from stock - and he has sampled all of the brands currently available in the UK. I doubt that he'd put his reputation on the line by going to print in an international magazine if he didn't believe in his own reveiw...
Admin
Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2002 - 6:35 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

oh, beHAVE.

I thought it was a lovely review ...
Pikkle
Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2002 - 6:23 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yeah, I'm sure he drinks a lot of absinthe too...

"and the aroma becomes the back of a herbalist’s store."

I'm sure he's talking about WAY back, you know where the old rotting herbs are... plus he fails to mention if it's the 45 or the 68. Fucking generic review if ever there was one!
Absinthedrinker
Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2002 - 6:18 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

This is what Dave Broom the spirits correspondent for Wine magazine had to say:

“Following Pernod’s welcome re-appearance on the market, here’s another from France – the home of absinthe – to redress the balance of dodgy distillates from Eastern Europe. [Un Emile] is from Pontarlier, where the first absinthes were made. It claims to be the only company using the original method of placing the flavouring plants in a still and distilling the mixture.

Nose: Neat it’s intense, with rooty notes of herbs, fennel seed, mint, citrus peel. Dilute with water and the aroma becomes the back of a herbalist’s store.

Palate: Fresh, very dry with violet, dried citrus peel, iris, anise. Strange and enigmatic. Dissolve a lump of sugar in it to remove rooty notes and lift the citrus.

Comment: Classy, like a turbo charged, complex pastis. A distinctly floaty sensation after a couple.”

Dave Broom Wine Magazine September 2002

Rating 4 stars (out of 5 possible)
Pikkle
Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2002 - 5:51 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Then just say 95 degrees next time... you say 35C again and I get the goalie mask out...
Wolfgang
Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2002 - 5:48 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

35C = 95F


+ smug + humidity ...
Pikkle
Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2002 - 5:47 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

There ya go usin' all that confusing metric shit again...

Oh, did someone say "fish?"

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