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Nevada to gamble on legalising marijuana

Sepulchritude Forum » The Absinthe Forum Archive thru January 2003 » The Monkey Hole » Nevada to gamble on legalising marijuana « Previous Next »

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Rosietwobears
Posted on Thursday, October 10, 2002 - 5:10 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

of course I don't take it personally....
I mean, look how little I said
it's those folks with the long posts that should feel the wrath, yes FEEL THE WRATH!
Besides for me, I wasn't discussing illegal anything. viva les pays bas!
heheheh

and thanks for the welcome
:bows and accepts roses:
Zman7
Posted on Wednesday, October 9, 2002 - 4:36 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yeah, but do they louche?
Head_Prosthesis
Posted on Wednesday, October 9, 2002 - 4:24 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

No shit dudes. Instead let's talk about
legalized crack(ers)...

Eh Rip! Pass dee I O's
Admin
Posted on Tuesday, October 8, 2002 - 5:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

can we please cease to discuss other illegal substances ... it's not fittin'

(and welcome miss rosie, don't take it personal. heh.)
Rosietwobears
Posted on Tuesday, October 8, 2002 - 4:42 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

this makes me realise how lucky I am to live in the Netherlands.
even tho I quit smoking pot a little over a year ago, I now make space cake!
Timk
Posted on Tuesday, October 8, 2002 - 1:43 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Being in the UK, a quarter pound of either is pricey, resin I get for £40 an ounce, and green about £20 an eigth.
Nascentvirion
Posted on Tuesday, October 8, 2002 - 1:41 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Weed is worth more than gold... Well good weed is.
_Blackjack
Posted on Tuesday, October 8, 2002 - 1:38 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post


Quote:

Bush is pretty eager to hand control of things like education and welfare over to the states. Can drug enforcement be far behind?



You silly! That would require the Republicans to actually be CONSISTANT in their rhetoric...
Timk
Posted on Tuesday, October 8, 2002 - 1:37 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Are we talking resin here?
Lordhobgoblin
Posted on Tuesday, October 8, 2002 - 11:01 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Less than $250 for a quarter lb!!!!! We're all getting ripped off in the UK then. And as Timk said we can't even blame high taxation, it's all down to good old market forces.

Who says that a free market leads to lower prices through competition? We should legalise it and enforce fixed pricing legislation.

Like Timk I have never met anyone who has bought a quarter lb for personal use. A couple of ounces is a big single purchase.
Melgib
Posted on Monday, October 7, 2002 - 4:10 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Bush is pretty eager to hand control of things like education and welfare over to the states. Can drug enforcement be far behind?

hey, I can dream.
_Blackjack
Posted on Monday, October 7, 2002 - 3:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

As I mentioned the last time this topic came up, none of this nullifies the FEDERAL law prohibiting posession of marijuana in any quantity. As has happened with California's medicinal marijuana efforts, all this will accomplish is increasing DEA scrutiny to make up for the relaxation of state and local enforcement efforts.
Nascentvirion
Posted on Sunday, October 6, 2002 - 6:28 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Shit its about time someone got the ball rolling in this country. I'll be long dead in my grave before it ever gets legalized in the US.
Marc
Posted on Saturday, October 5, 2002 - 11:33 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

250 joints! Good for picking your teeth.
Bob_Chong
Posted on Saturday, October 5, 2002 - 10:47 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

"But opponents don't view 3 ounces (84 grams) as a small amount. That's enough for 250 marijuana cigarettes..."

250? Pinners, maybe.
Melgib
Posted on Saturday, October 5, 2002 - 9:05 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Timk, the last time I bought a QP (probably '87 or '88) I paid $250. Sold three oz. for 100 bucks each, made 50 bucks and got my own oz. free. I hear the stuff is cheaper and better quality these days. I'd love to know for sure. With the week I've had, I could use some happy.
Timk
Posted on Saturday, October 5, 2002 - 10:56 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

"I think Nevada should decriminalize possession of 4 ounces or less. That way, you could still buy a quarter pound, which is frankly cheaper than buying three ounces ... or at least, it was the last time I bought a QP, admittedly 15 years ago."

Jeez, what the heck does the stuff cost you out there, I can count the times I have seen a quarter pound on the fingers of one hand, oh well, at least I cant blame the high prices on extortionate U.K. taxes.
Pataphysician
Posted on Saturday, October 5, 2002 - 7:12 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I think Nevada should decriminalize gambling.
Melgib
Posted on Saturday, October 5, 2002 - 7:00 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I think Nevada should decriminalize possession of 4 ounces or less. That way, you could still buy a quarter pound, which is frankly cheaper than buying three ounces ... or at least, it was the last time I bought a QP, admittedly 15 years ago.
Nilson
Posted on Friday, October 4, 2002 - 12:55 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

LOL at "grassroots movement"!

Perhaps the anti-pot group could call themselves "MARM" -- Mothers Against Reefer Madness
Marc
Posted on Friday, October 4, 2002 - 9:42 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

well, maybe some good pot will open up their eyes
to what a hellhole Las Vegas is.
Timk
Posted on Friday, October 4, 2002 - 9:20 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Blagged from Msn news, thought this might to be of interest to some of you.

Nevada to gamble on legalising marijuana
By Steve Freiss LAS VEGAS (Reuters) - Famously freewheeling Nevada, home to legal brothels, grocery store slot machines and some of the fanciest casinos on earth, may break another vice barrier this November when voters decide whether to make it the first state in the nation to legalise marijuana. A trail-blazing initiative appearing on the state ballot asks the public to decriminalise possession of less than 3 ounces (84 grams) of cannabis for people over 21 and to require state legislators to devise a regulatory system for its production and sale. Under Nevada law, even if the measure passes in November, it would have to be approved by voters again in 2004 to become a constitutional amendment. But proponents are hopeful the measure will pass, marking a startling break from federal drug laws that bar all marijuana possession. The petition effort that placed the initiative on the ballot garnered more than 109,000 signatures or nearly double the required number. A September 26 poll by the NBC affiliate in Las Vegas showed a majority of voters supporting the measure, with 55 percent in favour and 43 percent opposed. In addition, the group promoting the constitutional change, Nevadans for Responsible Law Enforcement, or NRLE, is flush with money -- it has almost $500,000 on hand -- and has run TV ads since September 12. Opponents, who waited until September 27 to officially form Nevadans Against legalising Marijuana, may not even have money for mailers, according to the group's members. A 'GRASS-ROOTS' FIGHT "The bottom line is that this is going to take a lot of talking and a lot of shoe leather," said Sandy Heverly, executive director of the anti-drunk driving group Stop DUI, one of the groups opposing the measure. "It's going to be a real grass-roots effort, no pun intended." Heverly is appalled that the largest newspaper in the state, the Las Vegas Review-Journal, endorsed the measure as a means to "bring compassion and common sense to drug laws" and that Republican Gov. Kenny Guinn won't take sides. But even if the measure passes, federal agents will still investigate and bust drug sellers, so anyone who sells marijuana -- even under a state law permitting it -- would remain in jeopardy under federal law, according to Tom Riley, spokesman for the Office of National Drug Control Policy. Pro-marijuana activists acknowledge that they targeted Nevada because it is a small state with a libertarian bent where voters amended the constitution through votes in 1998 and 2000 to legalise medical marijuana. "This is about responsible adults using marijuana in the privacy of their homes as well as guaranteed legal access to medical marijuana because right now, patients still have to buy it from drug dealers in order to get it," said Billy Rogers, a Texan sent to Nevada to run the NRLE campaign. But opponents don't view 3 ounces (84 grams) as a small amount. That's enough for 250 marijuana cigarettes and more than what a person would have for their personal use, they say. They're also outraged by what they see as an invasion of the state by an outside activist group that now has 50 paid campaign workers here. Heverly and others argue that the initiative as worded could invalidate current intoxicated driving laws regarding marijuana, raise auto insurance rates for everyone and turn Nevada into a haven for pot smokers. "All Nevada is going to do is look stupid and foolish," said Gary Booker, a prosecutor in Clark County, which includes Las Vegas. "It would be like enacting a constitutional amendment that legalises slavery. It's illegal and it will still be illegal." AN AMERICAN AMSTERDAM? Booker insisted that few people are convicted in America solely for low-level marijuana possession. He said most of those who are arrested are accused of other crimes, but plead down to a conviction on just the marijuana charge. And he noted that Nevada's law is already lenient. Possession of less than an ounce (28 grams) of marijuana is a misdemeanour for which an offender must pay a $600 fine, and possession of between 1 ounce (28 grams) and 100 pounds (45 kg) is a felony that carries a mandatory probation sentence for the first two offences. Many Democrats believe that the marijuana question, which is expected to draw liberal voters to the polls, could help them in other races this fall. And some Sin City businesses are positively high on the prospect of legal pot -- which they see as offering yet another attraction for a city that already boasts casino versions of New York, Paris and ancient Egypt. "There are unlimited tourism possibilities," gushed Terry Wilsey of A Answer on Travel. "Las Vegas could become the American Amsterdam."

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