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Archive through October 16, 2002

Sepulchritude Forum » The Absinthe Forum Archive thru January 2003 » Strictly Absinthe & Collectibles » Un Emile, or Some Drippings From The Brain Pan » Archive through October 16, 2002 « Previous Next »

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Petermarc
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 2:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

still-shock...time varies for different products to settle down...you don't get still-shock from macerated or oil-mixed products...
Greenmeanie
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 9:41 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hey Dr O!

I dunno if this is some new, undiscovered, double super-secret turn piss-into-ambrosia process. We can only hope, and experiment. What I do know is that it did wonders for my Un Emile (and it was good to begin with). This may have been a big fat fluke or it may only work with Un Emile and it may be purely subjective. I was just thrilled and ver surprised by what I discovered. I don't have a definitive answer and maybe we never will but I'm gonna try others and see. Should be fun {hic}!

I guess it's like Wolfgang said, if it's over cooked or just plain bad shit then it may be beyond repair. However, if you have a product that may just be immature or otherwise not fatally damaged, then this MIGHT do SOMETHING. Bottom line, it can't hurt to try.

Petermarc mentioned something about putting wine in a carafe or decanter and shaking it violently with excellent results. This has me thinking that the same process might speed up the aereation process with absinthe. Do I smell a new market for absinthe decanters with stoppers in the shape of a faire!!??
Tavarua
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 9:01 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wolfgang has invented a maneuver. SWEET!!!! What would Eddie Lizard make of this?
Dr_Ordinaire
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 7:07 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sorry, I missed that post by Wolfgang. (Or probably I did read it and stayed in my subconscious memory...)

If the "half-bottle process" keeps working for other absinthes it will be a major milestone in the history of absinthe.

In that case, maybe we should name it: "The Wolfgang Maneuver."
Greenmeanie
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 2:34 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wolf,

Thanks for the explaination as to why Kubler tastes that way. Interesting. BTW, I never knew what "over cooked" meant.

Dr O,

See the first post here for my observations. As far as the "half bottle process", Wolfgang has that patent!

There must be something to this aereation/aging/whatever theory. This is the only reason that I can think of for my noticing an improvement in my Un Emile. Like I mentioned somewhere here, kinda like letting a bottle of wine breathe.

I'm planning on getting another Un Emile before the holidays and I plan on trying it again. Maybe I'll take a smaller (1/2 pint?) bottle and fill it to the top so it gets NO air and see if it tastes like "new" after a few months and then compare it to the same batch that has been sitting in a 1/2 full regular bottle that has been shaken (not stirred). Could be interesting!
Wolfgang
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 12:56 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

about the ''half bottle trick'', it is my theory but I can`t be sure. I just let a 1/2 bottle of Emile sit for many weeks and when I tasted it later, it was better. That`s all I can say about it. No scientific study there ;-)
Wolfgang
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 12:52 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

It is extremely overcooked. If some people like it, fine, but it is a good exemple of what overcooked is. Why is it bad ? because it dominate the taste and hides the more complexe floral and herbal tastes we could find in a nice absinthe.

(overcooked means distillation pushed too far. Usually that means someone want to make as much as possible, even if it`s undrinkable. I believe this taste comes mainly from anis).
Dr_Ordinaire
Posted on Tuesday, October 15, 2002 - 8:32 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Err..., Greenmeanie, it's only a theory, I haven't tried it myself.

Please report your results.
Greenmeanie
Posted on Tuesday, October 15, 2002 - 5:51 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wolf,

It's not bad, just not what I expected. Kinda, well, different.
Wolfgang
Posted on Tuesday, October 15, 2002 - 5:36 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

IMO, nothing can be done to kubler to make it palatable except storing it in the St-Graal for at least a day. LOL
Greenmeanie
Posted on Tuesday, October 15, 2002 - 1:47 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks Dr. O!

I didn't know about the "pour half into another bottle" thing. Just got a new Kubler and a F. Guy from markus last week that didn't impresme as much as I had hoped (good but not great). Maybe I built it up in my mind. Dunno but I'm gonna try the "aereation" trick.
Petermarc
Posted on Tuesday, October 15, 2002 - 9:59 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

this is not always true, infact many wines improve with exposure to air(although they eventually diminish) or even shaking...i had a friend who sold wine and the first time he served me condrieu
(a light, fragrant french wine made with the viognier grape) he poured it into a decanter, shook it violently, and then proceeded to 'snort' the aromas of the wine, as opposed to drinking it...i can assure you that it smelled much better than it tasted, even though the taste was very good...
Dr_Ordinaire
Posted on Tuesday, October 15, 2002 - 7:35 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

This "aereation" manoeuver is interesting because it is so counter-intuitive.

With wine, one tries to minimize exposure to oxygen. With absinthe, it seems that the best way to quickly improve it is to pour half of a new bottle into an old empty one...

And maybe, even (Horreur!)...shake it!
Petermarc
Posted on Sunday, October 13, 2002 - 5:35 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

and how...but more often with the better stuff...
Greenmeanie
Posted on Sunday, October 13, 2002 - 4:13 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Peter,

Amazing how that happens. It never ceases to surprise me.
Petermarc
Posted on Sunday, October 13, 2002 - 3:59 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

>I've had some wine when first opened that tasted like crap and after sitting a few hours become drinkable.

one of the best burgundies ( a chambolle-musigny)
i ever drank smelled exactly like a shit-filled cow barn when it was first opened...after a while open, it blossomed into a flower garden...
Petermarc
Posted on Sunday, October 13, 2002 - 3:55 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

the system of 'oxygénée' was described more like injecting air (oxygene) into the absinthe, almost like adding carbonation...some other absinthe makers (junod for one) took pride in stating that their absinthe was 'non-oxygénée' but naturally aged, presumably in wood casks or glass 'bon-bons'...
Greenmeanie
Posted on Sunday, October 13, 2002 - 11:24 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr O-

Could be. Same process (except more prolonged) as letting a bottle of wine breathe. I've had some wine when first opened that tasted like crap and after sitting a few hours become drinkable.
Dr_Ordinaire
Posted on Sunday, October 13, 2002 - 7:12 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

"yup. I think not only aging but aeration can help."

Could there be a relationship between this "aereation" and "oxygenee", which, if my French doesn't fail me, means "oxygenated"?
Chevalier
Posted on Wednesday, October 9, 2002 - 3:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

That is WONDERFUL news. The French should feel ashamed that the "nation of shopkeepers" has outpaced them.

Lord Hobgoblin, will Fortnum & Mason be seeing you soon?
Absinthedrinker
Posted on Tuesday, October 8, 2002 - 8:20 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

It will be delivered to them by this weekend, failing that Gerry's or Vintage House also stock it.
Herb
Posted on Tuesday, October 8, 2002 - 8:17 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Cool. Any idea when they will stock it? Will be in London in a couple weeks...
Absinthedrinker
Posted on Tuesday, October 8, 2002 - 8:09 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I can't resist mentioning that we have just sold Un Emile to Fortnum & Mason (the Queen's grocer) so maybe it will become the first absinthe sold by Royal Appointment...
Wolfgang
Posted on Monday, October 7, 2002 - 9:22 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

yup. I think not only aging but aeration can help. I will pour half of my next bottle into the old empty one and will wait at least 3-4 weeks before drinking.
Greenmeanie
Posted on Monday, October 7, 2002 - 3:27 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I'm not trying to drag up an old and sore topic here. However, I have an interesting observation to note.

Back when Un Emile 68 was first introduced I bought a bottle. I thought it was great then and I still do. I did notice three things about it when it was newly opened, and for several weeks after (until I put it up).

(in no particular order)

First, it had an alcohol smell to it. Slight but noticable.

Second, the smell had a strange (but NOT unpleasant) yet familiar pungent undertone to it. To this day I can't place it. Then again, I wouldn't know hyssop if it bit me in the ass.

Third, the dreaded "fish" smell. At the time it was SO DAMND SLIGHT. Unless other people got a bad batch, it was vastly over rated!

Today. I pulled it off the shelf and gave it a whiff. WOW! Very interesting, all three of the above have totally disappeared. It now has a nice mellow, well rounded, herbal smell with no detractors. It must benefit from some quiet time on the shelf. Taste? IMHO, it has improved. That underlying smell I mentioned also translated into an underlying taste. It too is now gone. While I liked it before, I'm REALLY loving this stuff now. Too bad the price hasn't come down. Then again, if it did, I'd be in trouble.

Well, just some musings on my part. Anyone out there have the same experience?

-Green

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