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Archive through October 19, 2002

Sepulchritude Forum » The Absinthe Forum Archive thru January 2003 » Strictly Absinthe & Collectibles » Un Emile, or Some Drippings From The Brain Pan » Archive through October 19, 2002 « Previous Next »

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2loucheltrec
Posted on Saturday, October 19, 2002 - 8:44 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

open season!
Greenmeanie
Posted on Saturday, October 19, 2002 - 4:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Is there a hunting season on trolls or is it open?
Le_Vieux_Hibou
Posted on Saturday, October 19, 2002 - 10:30 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

The oxygen tank can be one of the little ones, about the size of a bottle of your favorite liquor, and with beer makers, AFAIK, it always is. You can buy them at Home Depot. With beer, it's only used in short bursts, maybe 30 seconds at the most. It's not a continuous process. The oxygen tank is used in lieu of air, because it's PURE oxygen as opposed to air, not because an intensive process is needed. You want to oxygenate, you use oxygen. Air is mostly ferrous sulphide, as we scientific types all know.

But in any case, I was pointing to the stone, moreso than the oxygen. I still think the whole thing is a waste of time.

"Who said this forum didn't generate stimulating, intellectual conversation?"

A few people and a lot of trolls.
Greenmeanie
Posted on Saturday, October 19, 2002 - 8:09 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dr. O,

Adding oxygen is probably a out of the question for the average person here and probably overkill. It is a bit specialized and can cost $$. Although, it IS an interesting concept. It is probably workable and may even be a quicker process (so thinketh my non-scientific mind) than aereation. I think it would need to be monitored VERY closely to avoid any problems.

To me, a complex oxygenation process is taking away the simplicity and fun of the whole thing. Although, some high-domes out there may beg to differ! There are probably some in the audience to whom home brewing is an avocation rather than just a hobby. They may find this to be a facinating challenge and I would love to read a posting of their results.

I really don't think that just adding air for a short period of time would present a problem, though. Unless you let it go for a week with the bottle uncovered and then you came back to an empty, evaporated, bottle! BIG PROBLEM!!!

(IMHO) Just take an aquarium bubbler, slap it in a bottle of absinthe, watch the bubbles (wheeeee) and then drink!

Who said this forum didn't generate stimulating, intellectual conversation?
Dr_Ordinaire
Posted on Saturday, October 19, 2002 - 6:46 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hibou's suggestion seems reasonable, but I wonder if it may be overkill.

In beer making, one is trying to introduce a lot of oxygen in a short time, while in absinthe one is trying to very slightly increase the rate of aereation, compared to a closed bottle.

Even a small aquarium bubbler would do that.

I wonder if accelerating the aereation and oxidation too much (as in introducing pure oxygen) wouldn't create problems of its own.
Le_Vieux_Hibou
Posted on Friday, October 18, 2002 - 9:38 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

BTW, the "stone" is actually metal. It's called a "sinter stone". Shaped like a cylinder with tiny holes in it. No way alcohol is going to hurt it.
Le_Vieux_Hibou
Posted on Friday, October 18, 2002 - 9:29 am:   Edit PostPrint Post


Quote:

Of course, it would be a good idea to build a similar device out of some alcohol safe material




Get a brewer's supply catalog. You don't have to build anything; just buy one from them. It's used to oxygenate wort after the yeast is pitched (more oxygen = stronger yeast growth). Stone on one end, oxygen tank on the other. Food-safe plastic tubing connects them. With that said, I'd be surprised if it made any difference whatsover in the application you're discussing.
Gelroos
Posted on Friday, October 18, 2002 - 7:10 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

>>I would like to suggest people not to use aquarium aerating stones. Those porous stones are not maid to be used in strong ethanol but in water. I would be affraid to end up with some alcohol soluble only chemicals in my absinthe... Of course, it would be a good idea to build a similar device out of some alcohol safe material or to at least get some information about the material used in those stone before using it.<<

Wolf,

You could use Limewood air stones, they are used for Skimmers for salt-water reef tanks, they are natural wood, very hard, but produce a VERY small bubble size and LOTS of them. They tend to get clogged after 3 months of constant use, but are cheap and more importantly they do not leach anything into the water. I would think that they would be a perfect match for what you are looking for.
Wolfgang
Posted on Friday, October 18, 2002 - 12:24 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Maybe. I was thinking about a half full bottle device so that would leave lot`s of air. The reason behind my closed circuit device is to end up with a saturated level of alcohol in the circulating air to limit ethanol loss.

It will be easy to experiment with closed or open circuit and compare the end products alcohol % to see if it makes a big difference.

I would like to suggest people not to use aquarium aerating stones. Those porous stones are not maid to be used in strong ethanol but in water. I would be affraid to end up with some alcohol soluble only chemicals in my absinthe... Of course, it would be a good idea to build a similar device out of some alcohol safe material or to at least get some information about the material used in those stone before using it.

As previously noted, this apparatus would be usefull only for distilled products as it`s goal would be to clean the ''distillation shock''. I don`t think it would be usefull for lesser kind of absinthes. In that case, it would also be a good idea to start with a high alcohol absinthe (because of the eventual evaporation). Amongst the commercial, so far, only Emile 68 could benefit from such an oxygenating apparatus.
Greenmeanie
Posted on Thursday, October 17, 2002 - 8:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wolf,

Don't forget to use the cylinder shaped stone that goes on the end of the air hose. They are used in aquariums to produce lots of little bubbles as opposed to one big stream of bubbles coming out of the hose end. Rinse it good first and then go to town. It must be hygenic because if it wasn't, all the little fishies would be croaking (or floating as the case may be). The stone should give faster aeration due to the production of more bubbles.

It should not take too long to accomplish the desired results. If it works in as quick as a day or so then you need not worry about alcohol evaporation.

If you made a closed system would that not be defeating the aeration process? What I mean is, if you are re-circulating the air (containing fumes, vapors, evil spirits, etc) back through the absinthe then you are not introducing fresh air and you are re-introducing what you hoped to take out. Even if you are not re-introducing the "bad stuff" the re-circulated air will become super-saturated with bad stuff and will no longer be able to remove any more bad stuff or introduce new oxygen.
Wolfgang
Posted on Thursday, October 17, 2002 - 6:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

What we would need is an air pump (aquarium...) with the input connected to a special cork and an output going way down in a large bottle (leaving much air space) to circulate the air in a closed circuit. That's something I'll try soon.

My guess is that such a device would speed up aging (this is loosely documented in some Delahaye's books). "bubbles for a week or painfully slow aging ? go for the Wolfbubbler tm!"

My guess is it wouldn't be as good as real aging but it would be better than nothing if you'r in a hurry.
Petermarc
Posted on Thursday, October 17, 2002 - 3:50 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

>If one only adds water, the result would be non-alcoholic.

that is correct, sir!

it's so, damn, hygiénique
Greenmeanie
Posted on Thursday, October 17, 2002 - 2:05 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Instant absinthe WITHOUT alcohol!!?? Fugeddaboudit!
Dr_Ordinaire
Posted on Thursday, October 17, 2002 - 11:18 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Re: "absinthinette"

If one only adds water, the result would be non-alcoholic.
Petermarc
Posted on Thursday, October 17, 2002 - 9:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

'absinthinette'...circa 1895...came in metal tubes for one dose and boxes of 8 tablettes...each giving two glasses...just crush and add water...been there, done that...
Greenmeanie
Posted on Thursday, October 17, 2002 - 9:31 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Instant absinthe! Just add water!!
Traineraz
Posted on Thursday, October 17, 2002 - 12:19 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hmm, leave the cap off for 6 months, wouldn't you have an empty bottle with some residue?

Maybe THAT is how they make "Absinthe Essence"!
Petermarc
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 5:06 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

>leave it in a closed or tightly sealed container, or you'll lose the alcohol AND the flavor

-advice from the 2000 year-old man
Perruche_Verte
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 4:41 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Good to know -- when I began investigating whisky some years ago I was always told, leave it in a closed or tightly sealed container, or you'll lose the alcohol AND the flavor... I guess I built up assumptions based on that advice.
Petermarc
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 4:35 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

not enough for anyone to care in the least, who started with a full liter...
Perruche_Verte
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 4:30 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Leave the cap OFF? Wouldn't you lose some alcohol by evaporation that way?
Petermarc
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 4:15 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

>Just when you get crap and hope to make it better!

not 'crap' but crapulous...
Greenmeanie
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 3:42 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Peter,

No, I realise that it is not for all wines! Just when you get crap and hope to make it better! :)
Petermarc
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 3:37 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

>Petermarc mentioned something about putting wine in a carafe or decanter and shaking it violently with excellent results.

i would NOT recommend this with all wines, especially old ones...but young, hard red wines or snotty, aromatic light whites seem to shape up with a little slapping around....
Petermarc
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 3:34 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

an interesting anecdote from pontarlier...we were asked to find some gentiane(an eau-de-vie made by distilling the fermented roots of a large, yellow-flowered plant, found in the mountain pastures-it is THE luxury beverage for locals, used as a digestif) for someone in the usa...a bottle was secured and we were instructed to leave the cap off for 6 months, since it was a recent distillation and not yet ready to drink...i'm sure it can be drunk now, but leaving it sit in an open bottle would disfuse the still-shock, and let it settle...even so, i would think giving it more air than just the space at the mouth of a bottle would be more efficient...

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