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Question about vintage louche

Sepulchritude Forum » The Absinthe Forum » Strictly Absinthe & Collectibles » Question about vintage louche « Previous Next »

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Bob (I_b_puffin)
le Duc
Username: I_b_puffin

Post Number: 104
Registered: 4-2002
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 9:14 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Temperature has an impact on the louche, the colder the better.
Semi Gifted Amateur (Masque)
Mousquetaire
Username: Masque

Post Number: 24
Registered: 8-2002
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 8:50 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I do not think that would have anything to do with it, but louche is so dependent on the time:water:alcohol ratios, it just might. Worth a check someday, just for fun.
Brett Tyre (Brett)
le Duc
Username: Brett

Post Number: 140
Registered: 4-2002


Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 8:49 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Maybe its the way I stir? Real gentle circular motions, not all rough like. Who knows.
Semi Gifted Amateur (Masque)
Mousquetaire
Username: Masque

Post Number: 23
Registered: 8-2002
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 8:45 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

So the basic thought is that the vintages had so much more in the way of complexity and additional flavorings the additional anise was not required to have a thick louche? Being that this was, if I remember correctly, bought by the shot, extreme care was probably taken in the preparation of the glass in the first place; ie. ice water, sloooow louche, so that helped as well.
Quidam (Artemis)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Artemis

Post Number: 757
Registered: 10-2000


Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 4:27 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

The louche is caused by oils suspended in the alcohol coming out of suspension when water is added.

The oils are supplied by all of the plants which go into absinthe. All of them cause some degree of louche.

Oils from anise cause the greatest part of the louche.

Star anise is not necessary to cause a louche.

Star anise can be used to boost the louche.
A greater than normal amount of anise can be used to boost the louche.
The taste of the product suffers to some extent with both of those tricks.

A well made Swiss absinthe will louche strongly without star anise or an abnormal amount of anise. That's why they louche well without tasting too powerfully of anise. That is why some old absinthes louche so well.

Emile is apparently not Swiss absinthe, nor do they artificially boost the louche with star anise or mass quantities of anise. That is why Emile does not louche strongly, but does not taste overtly of anise, either.

The age of the product has nothing to do with it.

How the product is watered and sugared greatly effects the louche in any case.
Quelle vie ont eue nos grands-parents
Entre l'absinthe et les grands-messes... ?

Semi Gifted Amateur (Masque)
Mousquetaire
Username: Masque

Post Number: 22
Registered: 8-2002
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 8:58 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

In the end, the Emile was good. But the louche on the Tarragona was thick. I will see if I can find the picture... could the age have something to do with it?
Marc Chevalier (Chevalier)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Chevalier

Post Number: 1246
Registered: 11-2001


Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 8:52 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Weird. I know you've mentioned this before, Brett: that stirring hasn't affected the louche in your glass of Emile 68. But for some reason, it always takes away the cloudiness from mine, and thins it out. As a complete and total non-chemist, I have no idea why.
Brett Tyre (Brett)
le Duc
Username: Brett

Post Number: 139
Registered: 4-2002


Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 8:06 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I've now mastered the art of slow drip with a carafe. At first I thought Emile Sapin had a very pitiful louche, but after slowly dripping ice cold water into it, I can create a beautiful pale greenish louche that renders the drink almost opaque. Its quite lovely.

Stirring: I personally have not witnessed it disrupt the louche; I thought it would actually help it by belnding the anis and water even further. But that's just me.
Marc Chevalier (Chevalier)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Chevalier

Post Number: 1245
Registered: 11-2001


Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 7:01 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Masque, you can obtain a fine louche from Emile 68 if you VERY slowly drip water over the sugar. You'll definitely need a fountain (or a faucet tap) to do it. Stirring the drink afterward will dissipate most of the louche, so don't stir until you've basked in the louchey glow to your heart's content.
simon pedersen (Simon)
Mousquetaire
Username: Simon

Post Number: 37
Registered: 7-2002
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 3:05 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

The louche of vintage pernod is not that strong compared to many. Quite often the light in the room or the way the picture was taken can make it look as though it was. However one thing i have noticed with the louche of vintage is that when left to stand for a few minutes it actually turns more opaque in texture a bit like un emile 68% does. I'm assuming that this is perhaps a characteristic of green anis.
Semi Gifted Amateur (Masque)
Mousquetaire
Username: Masque

Post Number: 21
Registered: 8-2002
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 - 1:13 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

While enjoying a glass of Emile 68, I was noticing the "thin" louche. I fiqured that this is because of a lack of star anise. I remember some pictures of vintage tarragona someone bought recently and the louche was incredibly thick... was the louche of old brought about by star anise as well, or if not, what caused it?

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