Topics Topics Edit Profile Profile Help/Instructions Help Member List Member List Edit Profile Register  
Search Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  

Lemercier Abisinthe

Sepulchritude Forum » The Absinthe Forum » Strictly Absinthe & Collectibles » Lemercier Abisinthe « Previous Next »

  Thread Last Poster Posts Pages Last Post
Archive through August 4, 2003The Levitating Grin 25 8-4-03  12:57 pm
Archive through July 16, 2003Georgie Boy (Mighty 25 7-16-03  11:38 am
  ClosedClosed: New threads not accepted on this page        

Author Message
Alexis Cousein (Sixela)
Paysan
Username: Sixela

Post Number: 1
Registered: 9-2003
Posted on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 - 1:58 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

> it is quite sure that the lemercier makers have
> most likely never tasted vintage tarragona, let
> alone any vintage, or have a realistic knowledge
> of absinthe history or they would never have
> used such a uninformed back-label that gives
> credence to the fire ritual

Actually, the back label story is a much more strange affair than that. It's actually the
*French* ritual *plus* the firing of the cube. If you remove "Verser un volume d'absinthe sur le sucre. Flamber le sucre (avec precaution)" the rest is perfectly correct (and it does mention
you have to pour the water over the sugar "goutte a goutte" ).

To my knowledge, what's on the label would be very difficult to actually perform. If you do fire a cube, it'd be rather hard to "etonner son absinthe" afterwards: pouring on a cube when it's melted and dropped in the glass is not trivial :&

Unless you extinguish the cube very fast *before* it melts, in which case you're indulging in the French ritual plus a frivolous show performance.

In other words, I think they're perfectly aware of what the ritual is, but they've printed something on the back label that can be used to justify almost *any* ritual -- probably to avoid offending the poor British souls who've since been brainwashed by the makers of a famous Czech high-alcohol cough syrup.

In other words, the marketroids have had their say in what gets on the label, and they're eyeing the British market. Not that different with what Pernod indulges in in Germany, IMHO.

Donnie Darko (Besançon)
le Vicomte
Username: Besançon

Post Number: 56
Registered: 7-2003
Posted on Monday, September 8, 2003 - 8:31 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hmm, I have to disagree with the comparison of Lemercier 72 to vintage Tarragona. It's hard to argue personal taste, but the only thing Tarragona has in common with L72 is they both have lots of Anise. I remember when the only distilled absinthes I'd tasted were vintage Pernod and Bettys #3, and I thought they were very similar, but once you've tried enough distilled absinthe, you'll be able to notice very big differences you didn't before. The wine alcohol in Tarragona gives it a buttery smoothness, which is a polar opposite to the piercing alcohol of L72. The aroma of Tarragona will not only fill a room, but an entire house. I didn't notice aroma from L72 except when I smelled the glass...
--------------------------------------------------
Gretchen--"Donnie Darko, sounds like some kind of superhero or something"
Donnie--"What makes you think I'm not?"
pierre verte (Petermarc)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Petermarc

Post Number: 496
Registered: 9-2001


Posted on Saturday, September 6, 2003 - 3:10 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

>But maybe you're right and i'm imagining things

we're all imagining things, and if they are good things, all the better...
Tuivel (Tuivel23)
Mousquetaire
Username: Tuivel23

Post Number: 13
Registered: 8-2003


Posted on Friday, September 5, 2003 - 11:51 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

"after tasting the two side by side (lemercier 72° and tarragona 68° circa 1950) just now, i would have to say that is wishful thinking..."

I just tried and smelled the lemercier again. Maybe the word 'copy' was a bit of an exaggeration but i still could swear there's a little something that reminds me of the Tarragona. I think this sweet aroma that smells a bit like honey or the scent of an exotic flower is something that reminds me of the Pernods perfume like scent that also had a similar lovely sweetness to it. There's also something in the taste that i can't really describe.

I feel the current Lemercier is a bit closer to Tarragona Pernod(probably by pure coincidence) than (earlier)Emile 68.
But maybe you're right and i'm imagining things, anyway, thanks for your opinion.
ENORMUS DICK (Louched_liver)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Louched_liver

Post Number: 2141
Registered: 12-2001


Posted on Friday, September 5, 2003 - 10:03 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I sniffed it and couldn't bring myself to swallah.
Hi, what're ya havin'?
pierre verte (Petermarc)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Petermarc

Post Number: 495
Registered: 9-2001


Posted on Friday, September 5, 2003 - 5:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

>I even had the impression it tastes like a flawed and very simple but still rather tasty attempt to copy the Tarragona. Anyone noticed the same?

after tasting the two side by side (lemercier 72° and tarragona 68° circa 1950) just now, i would have to say that is wishful thinking...it is quite sure that the lemercier makers have most likely never tasted vintage tarragona, let alone any vintage, or have a realistic knowledge of absinthe history or they would never have used such a uninformed back-label that gives credence to the fire ritual (that said, even pernod-ricard mentions the fire ritual on german necktags of their absinthe 68°)...their absinthe does seem like a modified combination of un émile and françois guy, which isn't surprising since they are also putting out an anonymously bottled supermarket absinthe at 45° that copies pernot's bottle and is a mix of pernot's and guy's label (also misleadingly named 'françois d'argeys').
Tuivel (Tuivel23)
Mousquetaire
Username: Tuivel23

Post Number: 12
Registered: 8-2003
Posted on Friday, September 5, 2003 - 2:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I've just tasted Lemercier 72 and vintage Tarragona Pernod 68 side to side and i was surprised that the Lemercier actually seems to have some similarities to the Pernod. I even had the impression it tastes like a flawed and very simple but still rather tasty attempt to copy the Tarragona. Anyone noticed the same?

I'd say it's the most decent commercial product i've tried so far, even tho the Emile 68 (an older version) seems smoother, but i prefer the overall flavor of the Lemercier.
Pervert Euchre (Perruche_verte)
Elitist Bastard
Username: Perruche_verte

Post Number: 506
Registered: 12-2000


Posted on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 4:14 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I tried this recently. It is very good. In fact, I think it's on a par with Un Emile 68, at least the last version of it that I tried.

There does seem to be star anise in it, and perhaps even a hint of licorice, though that is being used very subtly if it's really there. (I have about given up trying to identify specific herbs in absinthe -- I was one of those who thought Segarra had fennel in it.)

It also has a honey-like note that I don't detect in Un Emile. I don't have any better words to describe it -- it literally tastes like there's a small amount of honey in the drink.

The alcohol in my mind doesn't create any more jarring presence than it does in Un Emile 68.
"Drink accomplished what God did not." --Marguerite Duras
Zouave (Giovannigray)
le Duc
Username: Giovannigray

Post Number: 200
Registered: 3-2002
Posted on Thursday, August 14, 2003 - 8:29 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My bottle of Lemercier 72 arived today as well, and my impressions are in line with Ted's and Donnie's. It's certainly worth trying, but - if I ruled the world - I'd drop the alcohol level to 68%, add just a little more anise (for flavor.. the louche looks very similar to that of Emile 68), and whatever causes that vegetal taste, whether it's pre-tails or overuse of some herb I can't identify - I'd address it.

Emile still rules.
Donnie Darko (Besançon)
Mousquetaire
Username: Besançon

Post Number: 27
Registered: 7-2003
Posted on Monday, August 4, 2003 - 4:53 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I also recently tried Lemercier 72%. The only thing I would add to Ted's comment is that it tastes on the edge of tails. It has the hot nutty vegetal taste tails will give you. The tails are not nearly as prominent as Kubler, but they're still there.

The label also seems to imply they distill some alcohol from grain, and I don't like the prominence of the alcohol in Lemercier 72% at all. The alcohol just doesn't taste "clean". Certainly worth trying, and it's a better absinthe than Kubler, but it needs work.
--------------------------------------------------
Gretchen--"Donnie Darko, sounds like some kind of superhero or something"
Donnie--"What makes you think I'm not?"
Crochety Old Bastard (Artemis)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Artemis

Post Number: 860
Registered: 10-2000


Posted on Monday, August 4, 2003 - 1:39 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

It's could be done with star anise, and it could be done with green anise. If one reads up on the essential oil content of these plants - that much is obvious. But it's just as obvious on the resulting palate ...

When it's done without using the first at all, and without overusing the second, that's what separates the men from the jeunzz.
"He is an unapologetic, crochety old bastard who will peddle any fibs that will make him a buck, or put him on a pedestal."

Administration Administration Log Out Log Out   Previous Page Previous Page Next Page Next Page