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Why does absinthe sometimes show up a...

Sepulchritude Forum » The Absinthe Forum » Strictly Absinthe & Collectibles » Why does absinthe sometimes show up as if it were red wine in old photographs? « Previous Next »

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Timk (Timk)
Paysan
Username: Timk

Post Number: 113
Registered: 4-2002
Posted on Saturday, July 19, 2003 - 2:23 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Real pernod has a very milky louche, and I would think that he first picture reflects how it would appear in a photograph of that sort. The second one is rather odd though.
Masqued Reveler (Nolamour)
Elitist Bastard
Username: Nolamour

Post Number: 708
Registered: 5-2002


Posted on Friday, July 18, 2003 - 10:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I'm with PV - The glass looks 2 toned, not just to the rim with liquid.
I watched a glass blower create some drinking glasses with just that style. He started with "bright green" for the bowl and then added the clear "orange glowing" glass for the stem. It turned out Dark green top and clear bottom.

The pair I got have a couple of very small bubbles in them - I guess that explained the price. But, they are nice next to my Absinthe display.

Check out that cool carafe/decanter to the right of the bottle.
Laissez le Bon Temps Rouler!
The Legendary Saint Herb (Herb)
Mousquetaire
Username: Herb

Post Number: 20
Registered: 5-2002


Posted on Friday, July 18, 2003 - 5:15 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I think Petermarc is right; it looks like the whole bowl of the glass is black with a diamond pattern of lighter lines. I don't see any clear glass above the black, do you?
Jay & The Imp (Thegreenimp)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Thegreenimp

Post Number: 354
Registered: 7-2001


Posted on Friday, July 18, 2003 - 5:14 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

This info came via a Lionel train collector list I'm on, it amy answer some questions regarding old B&W photos.

Since photo emulsion response was once near and dear to my heart (and to
my paycheck) I had to do a lot of work on B&W response to color types. Just to
make sure that I wasn't remembering wrong I dragged out a few of the old
texts. For that time period the major film choices would have been

Orthochromatic - sensitive to all but red light
Panchromatic - sensitive to light of all colors

Panchromatic for that period would have most likely been either

Type B - balanced sensitivity over the entire spectrum with good green
response.

or

Type C - high red and low blue sensitivity.

On the pages of one of my books is a side-by-side comparison of Ortho and
Panchro emulsion response to color and, based on the table, Orthochromatic
would have made the "A" stand out like a sore thumb and both of the Panchromatics
would have been able to differentiate between red and green. The table also
illustrates the point that Joseph made in his initial post. This would suggest
that unless someone doctored the print or Hood made cars with removable "A"'s
that the picture is probably legit and there is no "A" present. To Paul's
point, it could be that the photograph is of an incomplete car. Such things were
done and it would certainly explain the picture since the lettering doesn't
make a lot of sense without the "A". ....so what's say we find the miserable
so-and-so who took the picture and, if he is still alive, give him the third
degree to find out "the real story". If he is dead ...well, I'm sure that with
all of the uproar this car has generated we can locate his grave site and set up
some silent pickets in protest! :-)


I've wrestled with reality for 35 years, and I'm happy to state I've finally won out over it........Elwood. P. Dowd
Georgie Boy (Mighty Fine Young Man) (Lediablevert)
le Duc
Username: Lediablevert

Post Number: 137
Registered: 6-2003


Posted on Friday, July 18, 2003 - 11:13 am:   Edit PostPrint Post


quote:

That's possible, but you'd have to be a psycho to drink a glass that big of absinthe neat!!!




Didn't you know?
That was the last drink he ever drank.
Suicide by alcohol poisoning.
>-I AM TROLLING FOR WALLEYE*> >--walleye-/*>
>----walleye--/*>
21st Century Rimbaud (Rimbaud)
le Duc
Username: Rimbaud

Post Number: 191
Registered: 12-2001


Posted on Friday, July 18, 2003 - 7:49 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

That's possible, but you'd have to be a psycho to drink a glass that big of absinthe neat!!!
simon pedersen (Simon)
le Vicomte
Username: Simon

Post Number: 58
Registered: 7-2002


Posted on Friday, July 18, 2003 - 7:30 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

It's more likely to be neat absinthe, as this can appear very dark in the glass and especially as it's black & white photography.
Bob (I_b_puffin)
le Duc
Username: I_b_puffin

Post Number: 159
Registered: 4-2002
Posted on Friday, July 18, 2003 - 1:14 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

It's also a fairly big glass absinthe glass.
Michael (Turangalila)
Mousquetaire
Username: Turangalila

Post Number: 11
Registered: 3-2003
Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 8:29 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Rimbaud -

If you want my guess, I'd say it's just for visual impact; the black in the glass makes it a nice visual focal point against the white background. It't kind of bizarre though...
21st Century Rimbaud (Rimbaud)
le Duc
Username: Rimbaud

Post Number: 186
Registered: 12-2001


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 5:26 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I don't know. I've seen other pictures which are supposed to be absinthe where the glass is only partially full and the liquid inside looks black-ish, so it's clearly not the color of the glass in those cases....
pierre verte (Petermarc)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Petermarc

Post Number: 452
Registered: 9-2001


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 4:52 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

i'm sure it is a mock-up label for that postcard because of the unsavory effects attributed to that absinthe...the absinthe could, of course be real...as far as the glass in the first picture goes, it is most likely a two-colored glass, i.e. the stem being clear and the bowl being colored...not that uncommon...after seeing many vintage photos and images, i can say that absinthe was pictured in many types of bar glasses and not just 'absinthe' glasses...
Georgie Boy (Mighty Fine Young Man) (Lediablevert)
le Duc
Username: Lediablevert

Post Number: 128
Registered: 6-2003


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 2:57 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

louche

Here's another louche pic.
This louche in this pic appears more cloudy
grey than black.
Also, notice the bottle in this pic.
Odd label, eh? What brand is THAT?
This postcard is obviously meant to be
humorous, but given the color of the louche in
this pic, and the real absinthe spoon and glass
in the pic, and the color of the louche,
I am leaned more to believe that this
is real absinthe.

But the louche below is just weird looking.
Which, I mean, almost makes you wonder
what might have been in that man's glass.
Was it even absinthe?
>-I AM TROLLING FOR WALLEYE*> >--walleye-/*>
>----walleye--/*>
Marc Chevalier (Chevalier)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Chevalier

Post Number: 1373
Registered: 11-2001


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 2:20 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

The Red Pigeon (Icarus)
Elitist Bastard
Username: Icarus

Post Number: 488
Registered: 4-2003


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 2:16 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Conspiracy!
Escapee from the drunk tank
Marc Chevalier (Chevalier)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Chevalier

Post Number: 1372
Registered: 11-2001


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 2:05 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Again, it would have been easy enough for the printers to retouch the picture, so that the black image would show up as light grey or even beige -- which would look a lot more like absinthe's true color than black does.

Why didn't they bother?


The Red Pigeon (Icarus)
Elitist Bastard
Username: Icarus

Post Number: 487
Registered: 4-2003


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 2:00 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I may be a smartass but I did post your pic

As for why it's black, or white, it may have something to do with the flash and the amount of louche the drink is undergoing.

Depending on the amount of black powder(or later on, flashbulbs), and the syncronization with the shutter, the absinthe may reflect different shades of white or grey.

Some pics may have not used a flash, and the exposure needed to bring the people/items to the forefront in focus may have resulted in turning things black.
Escapee from the drunk tank
Georgie Boy (Mighty Fine Young Man) (Lediablevert)
le Duc
Username: Lediablevert

Post Number: 124
Registered: 6-2003


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 1:19 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Anyway, I dig this old guy's shoes.
I wonder if he was buried in them....
>-I AM TROLLING FOR WALLEYE*> >--walleye-/*>
>----walleye--/*>
Marc Chevalier (Chevalier)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Chevalier

Post Number: 1366
Registered: 11-2001


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 10:00 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Red Pidgeon wrote: "Ummm, it's hard to show the color green in a BW ..."

True, but why try to "make it show up"? And even if they felt it necessary, why show it as "black"? No absinthe of the time even approached that color.

Rimbaud: As for photographic processes, postcards and advertising cards of the 1900s were retouched when it was deemed necessary. If the printers saw that the absinthe accidentally came out black in their photo, they could have easily touched it up to look, say, light grey or beige -- if they had wanted to. My guess is that they didn't want to. So the question still stands: why?


21st Century Rimbaud (Rimbaud)
le Duc
Username: Rimbaud

Post Number: 182
Registered: 12-2001


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 9:58 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hey wiseass, what I failed to mention is that in other old pre-ban pics I've come across, louched absinthe looks as you think it would in a b&w picture: white. So why does it look closer to black in some pictures? Does it have something to do with the ingredients of those particular absinthes affecting the photographic process, in the same way that if you and your friend are both wearing black shirts and someone takes a color infared photograph of you standing next to each other, the resulting photo may show one of you wearing black while the other appears to be wearing red, which apparently has something to do with the material that the shirts are made of? (Apologies for the run-on sentence) Or is it the fact that there were several different photographic processes being used in the mid to late 1800's? These are all just hypotheses that I'm rambling off here. Does anyone with a better knowledge of photography and/or absinthe have any ideas?
The Red Pigeon (Icarus)
Elitist Bastard
Username: Icarus

Post Number: 486
Registered: 4-2003


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 9:32 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ummm, it's hard to show the color green in a BW pic.

Escapee from the drunk tank
21st Century Rimbaud (Rimbaud)
le Duc
Username: Rimbaud

Post Number: 181
Registered: 12-2001


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 9:28 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Okay, I'm having trouble uploading the pic. Go here for an example - http://www.allthingsabsinthe.com/images/artifacts/MrDistinguished.jpg
21st Century Rimbaud (Rimbaud)
le Duc
Username: Rimbaud

Post Number: 180
Registered: 12-2001


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 9:24 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I've been wondering about this for quite some time now. Here's one example of many that I've seen...

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