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Film: Les Enfants du Siecle

Sepulchritude Forum » The Absinthe Forum » Arts & Other Philosophical Sundries » Film: Les Enfants du Siecle « Previous Next »

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Carl Guderian (Bjacques)
le Duc
Username: Bjacques

Post Number: 286
Registered: 4-2001
Posted on Friday, August 8, 2003 - 4:58 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hey Marc, thanks for the tip. If I get a picture I'll post it.
The Levitating Grin Salesman (Rimbaud)
le Duc
Username: Rimbaud

Post Number: 248
Registered: 12-2001


Posted on Friday, August 1, 2003 - 6:33 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I should have known...
"Please pardon our appearance while we are levitating..."
Mrs. Head (Admin)
Madame Guillotine
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1242
Registered: 1-1998


Posted on Thursday, July 31, 2003 - 6:16 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

have I seen it? only about 50 times.

"Its better to feel something than nothing..."
"Even if its teeth."

I have it on VHS *and* DVD


A lady who has a secure seat is never prettier than when in the saddle, and she who cannot make her conquest there, may despair of the power of her charms elsewhere. - THE MANNERS THAT WIN, 1880

http://www.feeverte.net
Pastor of Muppets (Emmy)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Emmy

Post Number: 226
Registered: 9-2001


Posted on Thursday, July 31, 2003 - 11:09 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

'impromptu' is one of my fave movies. definitely see it if you haven't. grant plays chopin, judy davis is george sand, and julian sands (yum) as franz liszt... with several other notable actors cast as well. you can borrow my copy if you want, K.
The Levitating Grin Salesman (Rimbaud)
le Duc
Username: Rimbaud

Post Number: 242
Registered: 12-2001


Posted on Thursday, July 31, 2003 - 10:58 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Kallisti,

Did you ever see the film "Impromptu" with Hugh Grant? It seems to have covered territory similar to "Les Enfants du Siecle" (which I have not yet seen, but would love to).
"Please pardon our appearance while we are levitating..."
Marc Chevalier (Chevalier)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Chevalier

Post Number: 1390
Registered: 11-2001


Posted on Friday, July 25, 2003 - 9:18 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Carl, I'm sorry for not responding to you earlier ...

Venice has a million churches, but only two of them display the dried-up flesh of saints. St. Lucy, the patron saint of eyesight, lies in a glass coffin that you can walk right up to.

According to legend, Lucy plucked out her own eyes after an unwanted suitor complimented them. She's "seen" better days, and her face (what's left of it) is covered by a golden mask. You'll find the old girl in the Church of St. Geremenia, across the Grand Canal from the Venice train station.

I honestly can't recall which Venetian church contains St. Catherine's foot. Keep in mind that Venice's defining moment was its (very political) abduction of St. Mark's body
from Constantinople.

Fun fact: Milan proudly holds the dessicated tongue and vocal chords of St. Anthony (famous for his preaching).



Carl Guderian (Bjacques)
le Duc
Username: Bjacques

Post Number: 277
Registered: 4-2001
Posted on Monday, July 21, 2003 - 1:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sweet! Where is it? I'm going next month. Plane tickets were cheap, thoguh I might have to sleep on a sidewalk...
Marc Chevalier (Chevalier)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Chevalier

Post Number: 1370
Registered: 11-2001


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 10:48 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I wish!

Last May, My girlfriend and I went to Italy (Pisa, Florence, Siena and Venice) for the first time. The weather was clear and hot. In a Venetian church, we were startled by the mummified "relic" of St. Lucy's body and head. (She was decapitated, but the two parts have since been reunited.)

We also saw St. Catherine's dessicated foot. (Her head is in Siena, and most of the rest is in Rome. St. Catherine died peacefully, but her confessor broke into her tomb, stole the corpse, hacked it up, and sent the pieces all over Italy.)


Mrs. Head (Admin)
Madame Guillotine
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1210
Registered: 1-1998


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 10:41 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ok, when we going?

heh.


A lady who has a secure seat is never prettier than when in the saddle, and she who cannot make her conquest there, may despair of the power of her charms elsewhere. - THE MANNERS THAT WIN, 1880

http://www.feeverte.net
Marc Chevalier (Chevalier)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Chevalier

Post Number: 1369
Registered: 11-2001


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 10:36 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hell, I'd see it for the shots of Venice. World's most beautiful city. Try drinking absinthe in a gondola at night.
Mrs. Head (Admin)
Madame Guillotine
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1208
Registered: 1-1998


Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 9:57 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ok, a year after I first read about it I went to see if "The Children of
the Century" movie had been released in any form in the US.

I mentioned it here last year when I first read about it, it's a film about the tempestuous
relationship between George Sand & Alfred de Musset that had *very*
limited release here (NY & LA only) and never seemed to make it to the
video/dvd market.

I had no luck on the recent search except that there were several pricey
used vid store copies from Canada.

I bought it anyway. I will not be denied ANY costume drama, especially
one that seemed so promising.

I watched it last night as soon as I got home...

I was stunned and seduced, it is an absolute gorgeous film. If ever there
was an argument that suffering *was* hip, this is it.

It follows their "love" story very closely, focusing on the trip to
Venice. I was surprised by how much the picture of events in my head
followed the storyline on screen. Except for some mumbo jumbo early
tragic death for Musset at the very VERY end and I do not recall her having
been cut by Marie Dorval, it is delightfully faithful. Absinthe is even
mentioned at the end in reference to Musset's spiraling degeneration.

Full of whores and bad behaviour, no punches are pulled. Both
characters are shown to be erratic and rough and aren't prettied up much
for the camera, despite both actor's undeniable pulchritudinous
proclivities (George is played by Juliette Binoche). Sans makeup and always
strained by suffering and over indulgence, even George's hair is
tousled, except when she's on her way to the opera.

The costumes are gorgous and faithful. George uses a deep jewel-like
palette of burgandies and cobalt, taffeta and velvet. Musset is presented as a
curled and pefumed dandy in creams and golds. Which highlights how much
he looks like a mewling angry baby when he has a fit, instead of being
dark, scary and menacing.

Unfortunately, Chopin doesn't make a cameo til the very end, and even then
he looks like (and we only see a profile) a big dry noodle with bad hair
who waves his hands about 12 inches above the piano keys. Not a good set
up for the next great love of George's life.

Poor George.



http://www.lesenfantsdusiecle.com/


A lady who has a secure seat is never prettier than when in the saddle, and she who cannot make her conquest there, may despair of the power of her charms elsewhere. - THE MANNERS THAT WIN, 1880

http://www.feeverte.net

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