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Archive through October 27, 2002

Sepulchritude Forum » The Absinthe Forum » Arts & Other Philosophical Sundries » Opera Discussion » Archive through October 27, 2002 « Previous Next »

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Nolamour
Posted on Sunday, October 27, 2002 - 10:44 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Tort...

I know this is somewhat off the subject, but today I heard Widor's Toccata fifth symphony again. I don't know if you are in to Organ compositions, but this is outstanding.

If you know it, cool, but if not, try to find this and listen. It's powerful.
Nolamour
Posted on Sunday, October 27, 2002 - 12:03 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hmmm...
It seems we both got DEAD parts. Coincidence, I think....I think....So.

I miss La Traviata...How was it?
Tortainglese
Posted on Friday, October 25, 2002 - 7:44 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have recently seen Suor Angelica. I resisted it for a long time because there are no men in it. The production I saw didnt have the dead son in it, well, not on stage I mean. It is quite the tear jerker.

I am not an actor but once I got to be a dead body in "Acting Shakeaspeare" with Ian Mckellan.
Nolamour
Posted on Friday, October 25, 2002 - 12:11 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Oh yea,
I was also in Elija - Wait, I was dead there too. Do we see a pattern here? ...Well, this time I got to rise from the dead.

My laconic claim to fame...LOL
Nolamour
Posted on Friday, October 25, 2002 - 12:02 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Tort...

Do you know Puccini's Suor Angelica? (sp?) - I was in this many years ago with mom, who, of course, sang the mezzo-soprano role. I was the dead son. And DAMN WAS I GOOD...being dead that is. ha ha.

We just found out...she is doing Handel's Messiah in December and she will also be singing with the New Orleans Symphony...don't remember when.
Tortainglese
Posted on Wednesday, October 23, 2002 - 10:01 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Most people agreed with me that is sucked. I go for free so at least it didnt cost anything. If I hadnt been so tired I would have stayed for the last 2 acts just to see it. Like I said, the design and staging were very clever.

Cool museum you have there!My boss has some costumes from the old Met. I dont have anything so interesting.
Nolamour
Posted on Tuesday, October 22, 2002 - 8:15 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I guess even with a sinus infection, the show must go on...even if it is like Gilbert and Sullivan (shrugs) - Were other people leaving as well?
Nolamour
Posted on Tuesday, October 22, 2002 - 8:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

And this too...

Circa 1908

aida
Nolamour
Posted on Tuesday, October 22, 2002 - 8:07 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Oooh, I hate to hear that...sorry it wasn't any good. I hope you didn't lay down too much cash on that one.

As for your next Operas - "Hey, Figaro"! check this out!

figaro

Circa 1883 (on my wall)
Tortainglese
Posted on Tuesday, October 22, 2002 - 7:47 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I didn't like L'Etoile at all. Left at the intermission. It sounded like Gilbert and Sullivan, which I hate. The design and the choreography were excellent though. The lead mezzo had a sinus infection. No it doesnt tour, it is part of the New York City Opera season. Most of what I see and write about here is the NYC Opera. Friday I see Marriage of Figaro, sat Traviata. Next week Rigoletto.
Nolamour
Posted on Tuesday, October 22, 2002 - 2:48 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

LOL - Hey Tort...

Sorry, my schedule has been a little busy as the end of summer has brought in new business.

I am still envious that you get to see shows at the Met and so forth. And No, I haven't heard of L'Etoile, although, there is a bed and breakfast in the South of France with that name.

Please tell me about it!! Is it a traveling Opera? Will it be my way soon? I look forward to hearing more. Have a great time tonight and I'll check for updates tonight or tomorrow.

A great N'awlins conductor to check out: http://www.schmidtart.com/artists/seibel/bio_seibel.html
Tortainglese
Posted on Tuesday, October 22, 2002 - 2:38 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hey Nola where are you? It is up to us to keep this thing alive. I am going to see L'Etoile by Chabrier tonight. Have you ever heard of it? I dont think anyone has.
Tortainglese
Posted on Sunday, October 20, 2002 - 2:33 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I saw the Zefferelli Traviata at the Met last season. WOW! Talk about over the top out of control opulence. Must have cost the earth. Actually, it was so opulent it distracted me from the singers.

Today on whim I strolled into Avery Fisher Hall, home of the NY Philharmonic and bought a ticket to hear tenor Ian Bostridge sing Purcel's Funeral Mass for Queen Mary. The only work by Purcel that I know is Dido and Aeneas, which I love.
Nolamour
Posted on Friday, October 18, 2002 - 2:14 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ah, "The Woman Who Strayed" - I remember La Traviata well. Mom was Flora, the Mezzo-Soprano part.

I found this: http://mitglied.lycos.de/zifrank/Gedda/english/
- Has some good downloads.
Tortainglese
Posted on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 - 8:21 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes, I am a big tenor fan but I dont have a particular favorite for Pagliacci. The recording I have is with Franco Corelli, Tito Gobbi and Lucine Amara, an all star line up. My mother has a Pavoratti recording.

My all time favorite tenor is Nicolai Gedda, although I never got to hear him live. I also love Ben Heppner and Jussi Bjoerling. Lately I have been listening a lot to French arias sung by Roberto Alagna, which is exquisite.

I am seeing La traviata next week. This is one of my favorite tenor operas because is captures that sweetness I love in the tenor voice. Dont know who is singing it though.

As you can see, I dont follow the women much...
Nolamour
Posted on Tuesday, October 15, 2002 - 7:40 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Tort,

I commend your response...Being in the creative arts field, criticism is part of my life and I guess I'm used to it. (Though, some may not be)

We're but 'Clowns' - fun, laughter, entertainment, mirth. But offstage? In Leoncavallo's 1892 drama of jealousy and revenge the boundaries between the imaginary world of theatre and the real passions of a troupe of traveling players are broken down with violent results.
Since you are a tenor fan, who do you like in Pagliacci?
Tortainglese
Posted on Tuesday, October 15, 2002 - 6:29 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hey Marc-I tried to contribute to the film forum but I am not savy enough on the topic. I spend all my nights at the opera and dont get to the movies enough. No one even commented on "The Piano Teacher" the only film I have seen in recent history. So I'll just keep chatting with nola about opera. at least we have each other.
Tortainglese
Posted on Tuesday, October 15, 2002 - 6:26 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I dont want to say much 'cause who knows who is out there. But yes, I understand the furrowed brow.
Nolamour
Posted on Monday, October 14, 2002 - 11:26 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sounds great...Rudi and Max are well versed in the art of Opera, I'm sure.

I spoke with good ole Mom and she gave me a furrowed brow about Lister as Salome. She was Bess in Porgy and Bess last season. What was your take on her as Donna Elvira?

Have you heard of Joseph Perniciaro? He was Spoletta in Tosca. He looked as if he was 4 foot nothing on stage and didn't well portray a strong henchman. It didn't really matter as his part was not too strong.
Tortainglese
Posted on Monday, October 14, 2002 - 10:22 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

As for the opera absinthe gathering...maybe spring. I am just about move. we could do some kind of group sale thing and get a discount if we have 10 or more people...I guess that is a long shot on the absinthe forum. I am happy to host it at my house. You can meet Rudi the Jelly Toe cat and Max.
Tortainglese
Posted on Monday, October 14, 2002 - 10:19 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Marquita Lister? I think I heard her in Don Giovanni this season at City Opera. Let me go check the season guide....sure enough, she sang Donna Elvira. Good luck with the Salome.
Nolamour
Posted on Monday, October 14, 2002 - 8:15 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Marc,

I hear you on that one...I'm just glad to see there are some people that want to discuss the civilized arts. Please take the time and spend the bucks to see a good Opera - they are timeless and quite moving if you understand what's going on. Today it's quite easy as most have the Supertitles above the stage that you can read. I think in New York they have monitors at each seat. Tort?

Speaking of bucks, Tortie, You're not kidding about the price. I usually think the way you do and try to pick and choose the best to see. However, this year I have to see them all. I have already spent money on Tosca and Solome...For two and three seats each. My girlfriend is a music director and my mother (as I've told you before) sings and teaches operatic voice. Whew...Time to make some more money for Don Giovanni and Rigoletto.

For Solome in November, The lead roll is Marquita Lister, whom I've heard before. Her voice is outstanding, but she has to be good to do this one...I hope she can handle it.

SO...When's the Opera Absinthe gathering??? (hint, hint) :-)
Marc
Posted on Monday, October 14, 2002 - 6:44 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

nola, tort,

I don't know anything about opera. But, I support your noble attempt to get more art-related discussion going. I hope people are inspired to join in.

I've been frustrated by the lack of activity in the Film Forum. I thought that the sepulchritude crowd would be big-time film buffs.
But, its been dead.

The most action seems to be between lordhobgoblin and blackjack in the Monkey Hole. And there's lots of talk over in the absinthe flea market.
But, the arts don't seem to be of much interest to the absinthe crowd. I find that peculiar. I would have thought the opposite. Maybe everybody's watching television.
Tortainglese
Posted on Monday, October 14, 2002 - 5:01 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

The most recent opera I saw was Salome at the NYC Opera. I see then entire season and I think this was the best offering thus far, IMHO. But the audience seemed to agree. This work is so delightfully weird and erotic. It doesnt get done much so you must see it when you can. Favorite baritone Mark Delavan sang Jochanaan (John the Baptist). Every time I hear him I am surprise by how big his voice is. I think Delavan moves next door to the Met this season and has become a full fledged opera star. Last time I saw Salome was in 1996 at the English National Opera. I took some friends who had never been to the opera before. Well, that was a mistake.

I was reading the Met guide last night and thinking about Tosca. I go just to hear the lucevan e le stelle, which makes me melt. The Met is damn expensive ($280 for an orchestra seat) that I have to be selective. Instead I was looking at Elektra with Rene Pape ( a gorgeous basso). I love Rene and have never seen this opera. For those prices, I prefer to diversify.

The exception to that rule is Hvorostovsky, a babe of a baritone, who is singing Don Giovanni at the Met. I have seen Don G. three times already this season at NYCO, but will go again to see Hvorostovsky do it. Usually I am not motivated by stars but the work itself. But some singers really have power over your credit card!

Last week I had the great pleasure of seeing my best friend make her professional debut with the Baltimore Opera in Lakme. An ex lover was singing the lead tenor role. Weird to see people you know so well up on the big stage. I had to laugh.

Ok, I have bored everyone enough so I will shut up now.
Nolamour
Posted on Monday, October 14, 2002 - 3:43 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well, we had a good discussion on this subject in the "Who's Drunk" Monkey category, but I thought maybe the Arts would be a better addition.

Tort...
Saturday was a big night at the Opera and the house was packed for TOSCA. The staging was fantastic and the voices were well enough for too many ovations.

Here was the lineup for the important parts:
Angelotti - Francis Courtney
Cavaradossi - Jerry Hadley
Tosca - Michele Capalbo
Scarpia - Kimm Julian

All I can say is, When Michele sang the "Vissi D'Arte", the house came down. It was outstanding and we kept her on her knees with applause longer than she expected, I'd bet.
Scarpia was one of the best I've heard as well.

If you know the Opera, you know the ending...This time she jumped from a Castle rooftop rather than a window...still, quite effective.

Solome is next...

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