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Archive through January 28, 2003

Sepulchritude Forum » The Absinthe Forum » Strictly Absinthe & Collectibles » Archive Thru March 2003 » Archive Thru January 2003 » And a new French absinthe from the Lemercier Freres distillery » Archive through January 28, 2003 « Previous Next »

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Artemis
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 12:46 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

"I read somewhere that the bitterness is supposed to keep lots of pest out of your garden."

It will also poison the soil so that after a number of seasons, nothing will grow in that spot any longer, not even more wormwood. This is not a myth, but a fact. Check it out on the Internet, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has quite a bit of info about it. Sorry, I don't have the URLs handy.
Artemis
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 12:45 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

"It's just a different sort which was used in the recepy of the company back in the 19th century."

That is completely incorrect. There was never a time when Artemisia Pontica was used as a substitute for Artemisia Absinthium in absinthe, and for good reason - they may both be wormwood plants, but they are utterly different. Artemisia Pontica was used in a final process to finish the liquor, to add mostly scent and some bitterness, and some color. It was never used in the main recipe except as a minor component, and in few recipes from few distilleries at that.

"I'm very sure, that it would not have won the 3 price on the Absinthiades in Pontarlier, if it wasn't Absinthe and if it wasn't excellent!"

I'm not sure of that at all. How do we know the judges would even know absinthe if it bit them on the ass? On what absinthe have they trained themselves? The answer is, for the most part NONE, because there hasn't been any absinthe to use for such a purpose. My guess is their expertise, if they have any, is with pastis or even wine. Peter and Ian have both related stories to me of such events, of which they have heard and/or attended personally, when they were flabbergasted at the product that took first place, over better products.

I can assure you that the concept of using Artemisia Pontica in place of Artemisia Absinthium is a gimmick, period. If it was a good idea, all the best distillers of the 19th century would have been doing it, but NONE of them were doing it according to the period distillation texts I've seen, and I've seen quite a few.
Drinkslinger
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 10:08 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yeah but are there any secondaries?(ducking..quickly).
String
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 10:00 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I planted my A.Absinthum almost 3 years ago. I couldn't find any at my local garden shops so I bought some online at a place called Lingles Herbs. I planted them in April two years ago and they were about 2" tall. By the end of the season they were about the size of a basket ball. Last year they were close to 5 feet tall by early July. I cut them back to 6" and they were again close to 5 feet tall and they spread to 5 feet in September. Aion is correct, they are like fast growing weeds, give them lots of room. I read somewhere that the bitterness is supposed to keep lots of pest out of your garden.
Chewing on just a small piece of leaf will numb your mouth for 5 or 10 minutes.
Chevalier
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 8:14 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yup.
Louched_Liver
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 7:34 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Chevy sez:

Quote:

Someone around here's going to accuse you of sleeping with a fairy!



Yeah, Marcykins.
Chevalier
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 7:05 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

You're gonna plant a garden in your bed? Someone around here's going to accuse you of sleeping with a fairy!
Louched_Liver
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 6:38 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thank you very, very much Aion. Now I'm thinkin' spring!!! I've got a raised bed all ready to plant with my fairy garden. What an education this will be.
Aion
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 5:49 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

LL,
Absinthe is almost a weed, no special care
necessary. It is a perennial, fast growing, you
can grow it from seeds or buy plants...
You can also grow melissa and hyssop, but
it doesn´t make sense for anise and fennel.
But you can also buy the whole crap at a herb shop, the A.abs. will not smell like fresh one,
but it will be good enough for a "sensual" test.

A.
Louched_Liver
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 5:33 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Aion,
I agree w/Markus, what a fantastic idea about growing an absinthium garden. I know flatout nothing about the actual plant. Is it an annual or perennial? Fast growing, needs special attention, grown from seed, etc... If anyone would care to expound, I'd love to find out more.
I think I'll start an absinthe ingredient garden to find out what all those tastes are, finally.
Mclion
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 3:00 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Aion,
an excellent idea... everybody should grow his or her own :-))
Aion
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 2:48 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

A.Pontica is (by far) less bitter than
A.Absinthum, otherwise it couldn´t be
used for coloring.
It has a darker, more aromatic scent, but not
the musky, powdery power of A.Absinthum.

Btw., I would suggest everyone interested in
absinthe should have a wormwood plant at home,
just to know how leaves and flowers really
smell.

A.
Crosby
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 2:48 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Timing's everything.
Crosby
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 2:46 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I seem to remember A.Pontica being used primarily in the coloring step for absinthe. Please correct me if I'm wrong, I'm no HG'er.
Dr_Ordinaire
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 2:46 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

"If the only wormwood that it contains is A.Pontica that is used in greater quantity to make up for the absence of A.Absinthium, wouldn't it be rather bitter?"

Actually, A. pontica is much less bitter than A. absinthium, that's why it is used in the coloring step.
Mclion
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 2:34 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Not at all. It's very well balanced.
Destiny
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 2:32 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I'm trying to remember some of the info from the hogsmack threads of yesteryear...

If the only wormwood that it contains is A.Pontica that is used in greater quantity to make up for the absence of A.Absinthium, wouldn't it be rather bitter?
Crosby
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 12:56 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Don's banned and Ted's taken a vow of silence and celibacy.

Markus,

What other brands were in that tasting in Boveresse/Pontarlier ?
Renee
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 12:37 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Where's Don or Ted when you need them?
Mclion
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 12:07 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

If you see it like that, maybe ok. But it is definitly Absinthe. A. Pontica is a kind of Wormwood as A. Absinthium is. It's just a different sort which was used in the recepy of the company back in the 19th century. I'm very sure, that it would not have won the 3 price on the Absinthiades in Pontarlier, if it wasn't Absinthe and if it wasn't excellent!

Markus
Gasspectro
Posted on Monday, January 27, 2003 - 11:14 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Markus,
So,in essence, what you are saying is that it is an oil mix. Perhaps a good oil mix, but an oil mix none-the-less. If there is no A.absinthium, it is not absinthe, but an herbal liquor. Absinthe, by the purest of definition,is a liquor created by distilling alcohol into which herbs, chiefly A.absinthium, have macerated in. If the herbs are distilled separately, then brought together into an alcohol base, what you have is a liquor via essences.
Mclion
Posted on Monday, January 27, 2003 - 10:29 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

It's not made with Artemisia Absinthium, but Artemisia Pontica, which gives it a smoother taste. All herbs are distilled separately, analysed and in the end macerated for a short time to give it a nice natural colour. I find it very interesting! A very nice taste and a reasonably price. Give me some weeks to have it ready for sale!

Markus
Nolamour
Posted on Monday, January 27, 2003 - 10:23 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

A 10-absinthe tasting at a festival in Boveresse/Pontarlier

F. Guy - Winner
Pernod-Ricard 68° - Second place.

Third place was awarded to the recently released Libertine, made by a distillery in Fougerolles, a long-time liquor producing competitor to Pontarlier.

Tell me more about this Libertine...what makes it interesting?
Mclion
Posted on Monday, January 27, 2003 - 10:24 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well, Fougerolle is not too far from where I live and I've tryed Abisinthe already. It's made with staranis and is not that big deal. There's another one I'm going to present in March called Libertine - quite worth to try. Very interesting...

Markus
Wolfgang
Posted on Wednesday, January 22, 2003 - 5:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Of course it is an abIsinthe, not an absinthe... funny french regulations ...
Giovannigray
Posted on Wednesday, January 22, 2003 - 10:25 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I contacted them a few weeks ago inquiring if they shipped to the US and received no response at all. I may try again if the spirit moves me, but I'm awash in Emile right now, so..not a priority.
Drinkslinger
Posted on Wednesday, January 22, 2003 - 8:57 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Don't forget the "La Bleue" you don't want to buy... http://www.lemercier.com/anglais/bleue.htm
Chevalier
Posted on Wednesday, January 22, 2003 - 8:36 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

http://www.lemercier.com/

With a funky, bubble-like absinthe fountain.

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