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Archive through February 02, 2003

Sepulchritude Forum » The Absinthe Forum » Strictly Absinthe & Collectibles » Archive Thru March 2003 » House Warming with Absinthe » Archive through February 02, 2003 « Previous Next »

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Crosby
Posted on Sunday, February 2, 2003 - 10:59 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Don't forget the Knacki Balls. They're sure to be a hit and go well with absinthe.
Artemis
Posted on Sunday, February 2, 2003 - 6:44 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

"neat little cottage the middle of a cow pasture"

Sounds like heaven.

Are there really a lot of people moving from England (or the U.S. for that matter) to France of late?
Destiny
Posted on Sunday, February 2, 2003 - 5:00 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I'm a little confused about where France now stands on absinthe. E68 is made in France, but cannot be sold in France. However, you can purchase E68 *outside* of France and then bring it back *in* to France? (Can it be purchased via mail-order if you live in France?)

I know the laws are all wacky on this subject, I'm just curious where they now stand.
Absinthespoon
Posted on Sunday, February 2, 2003 - 3:55 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

my old "stomping grounds"! In university I spent a semester in french immersion near Lisieux. In the mornings we had class at the lycée in Lisieux, and in the afternoons we went to class with our prof. in an old manoir in Fauguernon, a very rural bucolic setting. I lived with a family in Pont-l'Evêque.
Petermarc
Posted on Sunday, February 2, 2003 - 3:19 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

>Petermarc you donít live in Normandie, do you?

no, paris, but my friend benoît noël (who has written several books on absinthe) lives in a neat little cottage the middle of a cow pasture in sainte-marguerite des loges near lisieux in the livarot camembert country...nice little area, but there seems to be alot of brits moving in lately...;-)
Bjacques
Posted on Sunday, February 2, 2003 - 11:53 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Aw-reet!

Thanks!

The hunt is on!
Emmy
Posted on Sunday, February 2, 2003 - 11:44 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

ah right. that's the site. in the "buy now" section they have some shops listed.
Emmy
Posted on Sunday, February 2, 2003 - 11:41 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

can't remember where, but i saw a website that listed some shops in London that carried un emile, there were several so i don't imaging the search being too hard.
Crosby
Posted on Sunday, February 2, 2003 - 11:38 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

http://www.absintheonline.com/News_and_reveiws.htm

For UK sources.
Bjacques
Posted on Sunday, February 2, 2003 - 11:20 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Where in the UK for Un Emile? London? I'm going there this week.
Artemis
Posted on Sunday, February 2, 2003 - 10:53 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

La Fee tastes better than most of the "absinthes" commercially marketed.

With that said, there is almost nothing "original" about it. If you want to give your neighbors something a lot closer to what their grandfathers would have been drinking, try "Un Emile" Pontarlier style absinthe, also sold in the U.K.

"Many French people associate non French wines with floor polish."

Absinthe made in Paris in the Belle Epoque was pretty much associated with far worse than that. A lot of the absinthe sold today isn't much better. Try the Un Emile.
Dejw
Posted on Sunday, February 2, 2003 - 9:28 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi friends
Thank you all for your suggestions. A few comments and replies

The green stuff I purchased in a supermarket in the UK (Tesco in Croydon for the Brits here) a bit expensive, but itís 68% vol, and marketed as a ďposerĒ drink. Itís ďLa Fée, made in Paris to an original recipe etc. It quotes www.eabsinthe.com

Petermarc you donít live in Normandie, do you? Everybody here has there own stock of calvados ďcalvaĒ, usually lovingly served from old lemonade bottle with candle wax around the cork. I did say I was serving charcuterie, which, as I am sure you know, includes saucisson :-) Itís not the shiraz which will amuse them, itís that itís got an Australian label on the bottle. Many French people associate non French wines with floor polish. Black olives, yes good idea, Iíll double up on the quantities.

Several older people here have told me that their grandfather etc died from absinthe, although they add it was probably the ethyl alcohol rather than the nasties supposedly found in the Green Fairy.

Please keep the suggestions coming, I will tell you how it went. Iíve invited the village Mayor, which in French terms is VERY important.
Petermarc
Posted on Sunday, February 2, 2003 - 7:05 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

i would suggest you buy some good calvados, so the locals can relate a little (the classic (but now rare) calvados/cider glass of the region looks exactly like an absinthe glass, cup-shaped, complete with dosed bottom and stemmed base-try a dose of calvados in cider, dangerously easy to drink)...chances are, depending on the number of people invited, several won't want to try it at all, but interestingly enough, young french people will have stronger negative reactions to the bad myths about absinthe than older ones, who seem more open to strong spirits, and home-made eaux-de-vies, created by their local 'bouilleur de cru.'
i suggest trying to serve it like a pastis and not make a big show of it, depending how rural your neighbors are...the shiraz will freak them out enough as they will have had little exposure to southern french wines, let alone foreign ones, bordeaux being about as exotic as they get...
good black olives, as has already been suggested seem to go well with absinthe, i would serve some hard, sliced saucisson, too...
Head_Prosthesis
Posted on Saturday, February 1, 2003 - 11:37 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Booty juice jam
aged in oak barrels
served on ryvita...
Giraffes love it with Absinthe
Marc
Posted on Saturday, February 1, 2003 - 11:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

testicles flambe.
Admin
Posted on Saturday, February 1, 2003 - 10:28 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

figs wrapped in prosciutto.
Zman7
Posted on Saturday, February 1, 2003 - 6:37 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

What kind of absinthe (brand) are you serving?
Dejw
Posted on Saturday, February 1, 2003 - 5:18 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

For those who ask, and I posted the Q, I live in Normandie. The current menu is bread, charcuterie, cheese, followed by tarte aux pommes and ice cream. Lots of wine etc. Again, just to amaze the locals I'm offering an anglophone wine, an Aussie shiraz.

DejW
Emmy
Posted on Saturday, February 1, 2003 - 1:21 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

haha marc just totally made my day with that image :)

and that would be some house warming indeed :D

but yes, olives, bread, cheeses, etc... maybe a fresh artichoke dip, some ripe tomatos to go on the spread... apple and pear slices and/or melons would make good fruit to go with the greenery... nothing too savory, don't want to overpower the absinthe, unless you're going to go spicy like absinthe is nice with indian food and such, cuts the heat nicely...
Petermarc
Posted on Saturday, February 1, 2003 - 1:04 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

what region?
Oxygenee
Posted on Saturday, February 1, 2003 - 12:30 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I'm sure if you follow Marc's food suggestion, it'll break the ice.
Artemis
Posted on Saturday, February 1, 2003 - 12:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post


Quote:

I've invited my rural neighbours to "a glass of absinthe".




Are you sure they won't show up with hayforks and torches? You might have a date with the local windmill for some old fashioned bonfire activity.

French people can be funny about absinthe.
Absinthespoon
Posted on Saturday, February 1, 2003 - 11:57 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Appetizers such as olives or olive paste on little baguette slices, as well as sundried tomato paste, etc. and soft cheeses go really well with absinthe.
Marc
Posted on Saturday, February 1, 2003 - 11:28 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

for food I suggest....oh, I can't do it.
Dejw
Posted on Saturday, February 1, 2003 - 11:05 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi

I'm a Brit living in France and I am holding a house warming party (pendre la crémaillère), and I've invited my rural neighbours to "a glass of absinthe".

I seek your expert views on the best way to serve a small glass as people arrive; and what food might be best?

DEJW PS Absinthe bought in Tesco in UK

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