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Archive through March 5, 2003

Sepulchritude Forum » The Absinthe Forum » Strictly Absinthe & Collectibles » Archive Thru March 2003 » Baby bleue arriving soon!!! » Archive through March 5, 2003 « Previous Next »

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Bob (I_b_puffin)
le Vicomte
Username: I_b_puffin

Post Number: 78
Registered: 4-2002
Posted on Wednesday, March 5, 2003 - 9:46 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sounds interesting, but I doubt I will be seeing it at my local liquor store. Unless they label it vodka then they would carry every variety of it.

http://www.chateaufakra.com/FakraENG/earak.htm
Barsnake (Barsnake)
le Duc
Username: Barsnake

Post Number: 157
Registered: 4-2002
Posted on Wednesday, March 5, 2003 - 9:21 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Mrs. Barsnake loves Grappa - Bonny Doon used to make a late harvest grappa style wine that is her absolute fav. Have not been able to locate it lately.
I have a lemon liquer - Caravella - keep it in the freezer - very tasty splashed on top of a big glass of seltzer water on one of the hot days we have here in Central Cal. - Sit in the pool. All is well w/ the world.
and the beat goes on...
Moonman's friend (Wolfgang)
Elitist Bastard
Username: Wolfgang

Post Number: 878
Registered: 7-2001
Posted on Tuesday, March 4, 2003 - 4:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

...But talking about other liquors, I just had a taste of Arak Fakra. It is a very fine product made of wine spirit and anis seeds and nothing more. If someone want to see what can be the effect of using wine spirit, get a bottle of this fine Arak. There`s no added sugar, just tons of anis seeds distilled with wine spirit. It is aged in special clay bottles, it`s smooth and fruity. Of course you need to like anis a lot because that`s all there is in there (except for the taste comming from the base alcohol).
Moonman's friend (Wolfgang)
Elitist Bastard
Username: Wolfgang

Post Number: 877
Registered: 7-2001
Posted on Tuesday, March 4, 2003 - 4:03 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

The Emile Blanche ?

I think it`s not shipped yet... We`r patiently waiting.
Bob (I_b_puffin)
le Vicomte
Username: I_b_puffin

Post Number: 76
Registered: 4-2002
Posted on Tuesday, March 4, 2003 - 11:13 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Anyone tried it yet?
Deadest Elephant (Artemis)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Artemis

Post Number: 537
Registered: 10-2000


Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 9:22 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yeah I all but froze it, but the bite was still there, and not lemon bite either. It sure LOOKS pretty, though.

I also tried Grappa and couldn't handle it.
Spoon Boy (Absinthespoon)
le Duc
Username: Absinthespoon

Post Number: 224
Registered: 7-2001


Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 9:14 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yeah, you have to really love lemon. Also you MUST serve it freezer-temperature. Harsh alcohol doesn't really bother us, we drink grappa too.
Deadest Elephant (Artemis)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Artemis

Post Number: 535
Registered: 10-2000


Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 9:12 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have a bottle of Limonello that was a gift from Head P. It seems that it's very popular to make it at home in Italy; there are a lot of commercial varieties there as well. It looked and sounded a lot more refreshing than it turned out to be; I find it hard to drink, probably because the base alcohol is kind of harsh and there's nothing else there but lemon.
Spoon Boy (Absinthespoon)
le Duc
Username: Absinthespoon

Post Number: 223
Registered: 7-2001


Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 9:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I want to try the fleurs de thym. If I remember correctly, it says delivery to France only for that one, but I think it says that about the genepi too, and they sent that to me. I haven't tried any of the other ones you mention, but I also got the gentiane (Bardouin) from them, and I like it very much. Liqueurs de France also has a gentiane liqueur now (haven't tried that one yet). The Sapin liqueur from LDF is very good also.

We always keep some limoncello (Italian version) in the freezer. I doubt if I would order the French version, since it's easy to get the Italian (Amalfi coast) stuff locally. yum!
Masqued Reveler (Nolamour)
Elitist Bastard
Username: Nolamour

Post Number: 584
Registered: 5-2002


Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 8:11 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Very cool...I'll give it a try. Have you tried any of the others?

Liqueur d'Amande
AMANDINE

Liqueur d'Orange
BIGARADE

Liqueur de Thym
FLEURS DE THYM

Gnole de Provence

Liqueur de Citron
LIMONELLO

Laissez le Bon Temps Rouler!
Spoon Boy (Absinthespoon)
le Duc
Username: Absinthespoon

Post Number: 222
Registered: 7-2001


Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 7:55 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes, they ship to the US, very quickly. I think they have some instructions in English now. (Knowing a little French is so convenient sometimes!)
Masqued Reveler (Nolamour)
Elitist Bastard
Username: Nolamour

Post Number: 583
Registered: 5-2002


Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 7:53 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Is Nice-Art ok with shipping to US? I haven't been to the site in a while, but I had a hard time understanding the checkout process some time ago. Although, I is a dumm Amaricun.
Laissez le Bon Temps Rouler!
Spoon Boy (Absinthespoon)
le Duc
Username: Absinthespoon

Post Number: 220
Registered: 7-2001


Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 7:45 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I highly recommend Genepi liqueur from Nice-Art. I like it better than Chartreuse.
Art Flegenheimer (Artemis)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Artemis

Post Number: 529
Registered: 10-2000


Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 2:55 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

And to reiterate, as to "taste or color":

Coloring is about fragrance and taste. The color lent by the coloring plants is almost incidental. That's why skipping the color step with the same base recipe can lend a product vastly different, and even better.
Art Flegenheimer (Artemis)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Artemis

Post Number: 528
Registered: 10-2000


Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 2:52 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Genepi is an artemisia that grows in the mountains of Switzerland. Alpine wormwood. It's intensely fragrant and very expensive. Unlikely that it's used to any extent in any modern absinthe because of the expense. It used to be used in the base, not the coloration, but playing with it in coloration might lend some interesting texture - I don't know that anybody has ever done that.

La Grande Chartreuse of 1900 or so did indeed contain a significant portion of Genepi.

If they have put some into Emile Blanche, everyone is in for a treat.
Masqued Reveler (Nolamour)
Elitist Bastard
Username: Nolamour

Post Number: 580
Registered: 5-2002


Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 12:43 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Isn't Genepi a plant extract in Chartreuse? Does it provide the taste or color? Or both?
Laissez le Bon Temps Rouler!
Pervert Euchre (Perruche_verte)
Elitist Bastard
Username: Perruche_verte

Post Number: 393
Registered: 12-2000
Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 12:22 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

And does it have genepi?
Robert Vandiver (I_b_puffin)
Paysan
Username: I_b_puffin

Post Number: 69
Registered: 4-2002
Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 11:52 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I wonder if it is Un Emile without coloring, or if it's a completely different recipe?
Masqued Reveler (Nolamour)
Elitist Bastard
Username: Nolamour

Post Number: 579
Registered: 5-2002


Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 11:37 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Right,
La Bleue takes its name from the Swiss slang for absinthe...(so they say)
I was just being literal (in the French sense of the words). I agree, the negation of the coloring process wouldn't make it bad...I look forward to trying it.
Laissez le Bon Temps Rouler!
Art Flegenheimer (Artemis)
Absinthe Mafia
Username: Artemis

Post Number: 527
Registered: 10-2000


Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 11:28 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

"La Blanche" means an uncolored absinthe.
"La Bleue" means a bootleg absinthe.
That's why it's La Blanche.
Every uncolored absinthe is going to "look like" water unless there's something wrong with it it, because that's what uncolored absinthe looks like. There's no way to know anything further about it until you smell it. If it's just an uncolored version of the green product, that's not necessarily a bad thing. If the coloration was not all it could be, skipping it could leave the product different, but better.
Masqued Reveler (Nolamour)
Elitist Bastard
Username: Nolamour

Post Number: 577
Registered: 5-2002


Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 10:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ah yes, it does look like just a combination of a La Bleue with an Un Emile label. What the hell, I'll try it.
Interesting that La Blanche is "the white one" rather than "the blue one"
...agreed, I'd like to know the answer to Gass' question as well.
Laissez le Bon Temps Rouler!
Gasspectro (Gasspectro)
Paysan
Username: Gasspectro

Post Number: 18
Registered: 1-2003
Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 10:06 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ah, all is well. But, is this "la bleu" simply the regular Un Emile 68 with the colouring step omitted? Inquiring minds want to know.
Mondino de' Luzzi (Drinkslinger)
le Duc
Username: Drinkslinger

Post Number: 152
Registered: 11-2002
Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 9:16 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

And a pic ...LDF La Blanche
Mondino de' Luzzi (Drinkslinger)
le Duc
Username: Drinkslinger

Post Number: 151
Registered: 11-2002
Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 9:14 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Clap Clap Clap!
2LY (2loucheltrec)
Paysan
Username: 2loucheltrec

Post Number: 245
Registered: 3-2002
Posted on Monday, February 10, 2003 - 8:28 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

i found this in my email this mourning :

Liqueurs de France are pleased to announce the arrival of their interpretation
of ‘La Bleue’, Un Emile 68 Absinthe Blanche, which will be available from the
first week of March. La Bleue takes its name from the Swiss slang for absinthe
and until now has only been available from clandestine distilleries in the
Neuchatel region of Switzerland. Because of the nature of these products, it has
not been previously possible to guarantee their quality, consistency or even the
source. That has changed because Un Emile 68 Absinthe
Blanche is professionally distilled by Emile Gerard Pernot and made to the same
exacting standards as the other products from the distillery. It is a true
absinthe blanche produced without any colouring step after the initial
distillation to preserve the primary flavours of wormwood and anise.

Un Emile 68 la Blanche is available for $90 for a 70 cl bottle, including
shipping to the US, with the usual quantity discounts.

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