The Absinthe Book

Guest Book Archive 1/98 - 4/98


This is a forum for visitors of la F╚e Verte to post their opinions, queries, and experiences in regards to Absinthe. All appropriate questions will be answered here as well, so all may benefit. Private messages can be addressed to Kallisti directly.










Name: Kate
I tried Absinthe when I lived in Prague in '94 and even managed to bring several bottles back to the States with me without any problems at Customs (I didn't know at the time that this was illegal). Since then, I've haven't been able to find Absinthe in any other European country. I tried many liquor stores in Spain and Portugal without any luck. I'll be going to Amsterdam in a couple of weeks and wanted to see if anyone has been able to buy Absinthe there. If you have, could you please post the name of the exact store. Thanks.
Fri Apr 10 09:14
Name: LILY LAZARUS
A WONDERFUL WEBSITE ABOUT SOMETHING SO INRINSICALLY BOHEMIAN THANK YOU FOR THE INFORMATION
Tue Apr 7 17:07
Name: spirit25
Dont you think the recipes here should call for at least 2oz of wormwood to reach a better result?
Sun Apr 5 13:46
Name: Kiddo
New Orleans is the place, and Herbsaint (with wormwood bitters) is the drink. I shall return.
Tue Mar 31 15:16
Name: Lost Sailor
E-mail address: pcongen@epri.com
The Following Recipes are from a 1948 reprint of a 1934 copy of The Standard BartenderÝs Guide. It is interesting that these recipes were still around long after the prohibition of absinthe, although there is a warning about the safety o certain drinks manufactured during ýAmericaÝs Dry Yearsţ. This warning, however, only relates to drinks which include Gin, Scotch, Brandy, Vermouth and cream in one drink. I guess these were ýspeakeasyţ drinks.

Absinthe Cocktail
3/4 Absinthe
1/4 Water
1 Dash Gum Syrup
1 Dash Angostura Bitters

Shake well with cracked ice and strain.

Absinthe (Special) Cocktail
1/2 Absinthe
1/2 Water
1 Dash syrup
1 Dash Angostura Bitters

Shake well and strain into glass

Brunelle Cocktail
1/4 Absinthe
1/2 Tablespoon Sugar
3/4 Lemon Juice

Shake well and strain into glass

Button Hook Cocktail
1/4 White Creme de Menthe
1/4 Apricot Brandy
1/4 Absinthe
1/4 Brandy

Shake Well with cracked ice and strain

Duchess Cocktail
1/3 French Vermouth
1/3 Italian Vermouth
1/3 Absinthe

Shake well and strain into glass.

Glad Eye Cocktail
1/3 Peppermint (Schnapps?)
2/3 Absinthe

Shake well and Strain into glass.

Macaroni Cocktail
1/3 Italian Vermouth
2/3 Absinthe

Shake well and strain into glass

Nineteen-Twenty-Pick-Me Up-Cocktail
2/3 Pernod Absinthe (note Recipe calls for the brand name)

1/3 Gin
1 Dash Angostura Bitters
1 Dash Orange Bitters
1 Dash Gum Syrup

Shake well, strain into glass and fill balance with soda water.

Pansy Cocktail
2 Dashes Angostura Bitters
6 Dashes Grenadine
1 Liqueur Glass Absinthe

Shake well and strain into glass.

Suisse Cocktail(different than posted)
White of 1 Egg
4 Dashes Anisette
1 Liqueur glass Absinthe
Syrup or sugar can be use instead of Anisette

Shake Well and Stain into Glass.

Victory Cocktail
1/2 Grenadine
1/2 Absinthe

Shake well, strain into glass, and fill with soda water.

Which Way Cocktail
1/3 Absinthe
1/3 Anisette
1/3 Brandy

Shake well and strain into glass.

Yellow Parrot Cocktail
1/3 Absinthe
1/3 Yellow Chartreuse
1/3 Apricot Brandy

Shake well and strain into glass.
Sun Mar 29 17:46
Name: Brian King
E-mail address: bking@goofiness.com
Homepage URL: http://web.wt.net/~we4kings
Thank you, Absinthe, for inspiring the stories on my website!
Sun Mar 29 15:46
Name: Adam
E-mail address: StrawWhore@aol.com
I return from a world of nowhere and nothing. I wish to share a few experiences I've had of late. In my first experiment I tried to create an "absinthe" tea. I simply boiled water and used wormwood in place of any tea. The result was a brownish tinted water with a flavor so retched that I could not compare it to anything that I've ever come in contact with before. I drank two cups worth and felt slightly dizzy. I am not certain if this affect was caused from the simple concoction, or if it was simply psychological. I, for one, will not attempt this again as I can still taste the wormwood's repulsive flavor in my dreams. The second experiment I tried was to take five cups vodka and steep it with wormwood, veronica, marjoram, coriander, cardamon, and a bit of mint. I steeped the ingredients for two days as that was all I could wait (I cannot forgive my impatience). The resulting drink was a yellowish tinted drink not quite so putrid as the first. . . nevertheless it was not a pleasurable experience. I appreciate the taste of a good vodka. The ingredients I added, however, depleted all of the flavorings of vodka and replaced them with the wormwood. Though I have not yet been able to reach a desired drink or effect, I now know that wormwood is an herb which possesses such a powerful bitterness that it is not easily discarded. I have found that adding sugar to the drink does little to improve on the taste, but I have also found that drinking hot cocoa with either of these was definitely the closest thing that I could find to rid my mouth of the taste. I hope that all of you will have better luck than I have. I do plan to continue on my experimentation until my appetite for this apertif has been satisfied. Bright Blessings and Bottoms Up!
Sun Mar 22 16:44
Name: Kallisti
E-mail address: kallisti@sepulchritude.com
Homepage URL: http://www.sepulchritude.com
Just a brief note to let you all know I posted the page "Absinthe Herb & Oil Vendors", with a small selection of online vendors who can supply you with your absinthe needs. let me know your experiences with the vendors if you use them, as I would like to know how reliable etc they are.

Also, I just posted the following message to a newsgroup, and though it is slightly out of context, I thought I would include it here for your edification. Here goes:

True absinthe though must be *distilled* to resemble something akin to the aperitif of old. The steeped absinthe recipes one finds on the net (and I have recipes for both on my site) can indeed produce something rather noxious, and it takes some experimenting to get a decent flavor, though it can be done. Wormwood and all ingredients called for in absinthe brewing are perfectly legal in the U.S., some of them are quite common. Everclear (pure grain alcohol), though, is not legal in all states. And when recipes *do* call for pure grain alcohols, they are meant to be diluted with distilled water as well, rendering the alcohol at approx. 120 proof. Where grain alcohols are illegal, a flavorless alcohol is subsituted, like vodka, and the water is left out of the recipe. This, of course, ONLY applies to steeped absinthe. Distilled absinthe *must* use pure alcohol.

The psychoactive attributes of absinthe are not experienced by all, indeed, very few claim to have experienced them, and it certainly takes a rather intense binge to get there. But it is certainly *different* than your standard alcohol high.
Fri Mar 20 17:42
Name: gregor
E-mail address: sisyphus2000
hello all absinthusiasts!!!!! just got the book ABSINTHE:HISTORY IN A BOTTLE, and it's fantastic! a must have! anyway, this may i'm going to england for the first time, and i was wondering if there is anyway to get some absinthe while i'm there? oh,by the way, for some good absinthe related footage, see TOTAL ECLIPSE, the film about rimbaud & verlaine.......quite a few absinthe scenes!!!! later...
Thu Mar 19 21:07
Name: Kallisti
E-mail address: kallisti@sepulchritude.com
Homepage URL: http://www.sepulchritude.com
I have listed two new Absinthe Recipes in the "Recipes & Cocktails" Section of this site.

One is a different form of distilled absinthe than the "Scientific American" articled one, lifted from "Pharmako/ Poeia" by Dale Pendell (Thanks Kiddo!). This is INDEED an amazing book. It has a wonderful chapter on absinthe, as well as delving into the lore and history of other dark substances.

The other recipe uses Essential Oils instead of dried herbs. I have no idea how this would turn out, but it certainly sounds interesting!

I am also working on a "sources" page for purchasing absinthe brewing supplies online. Look for it soon. One thing I've noticed, is that is much more expensive to buy herbs online (for the most part)... ferinstance: Wormwood from your local herb supplier would be around $1.50 (or so), while online it averages between $2-4. This isn't the case with essential oils though. One pays for the convenience, I suppose!
Wed Mar 18 19:27
Name: Lilith
E-mail address: lilith@exoskeletonrevolution.com
Homepage URL: http://www.exoskeletonrevolution.com


Missing the fragrant aroma of frankincense, yowling kitties, and pulling long red hairs out of my bosom...

I long to hear the sound of your laughter, the taste of Herbsaint, and soft strains of Chopin wafting from the back room.

I ache for you both...  and the feel of your bed.

Please come to me soon...

Je vous aime,
~Lilith~

Mon Mar 16 19:22
Name: ~villainess~
E-mail address: villa_iness@hotmail.com
Homepage URL: http://home.earthlink.net/~cswright/vill/cat.html
Greetings! WOW! Immensely enjoyed ALL of your pages.... An excellent artist you are....I never really knew what Absinthe was....sounds very interesting! Take care. ~villainess~
Sat Mar 14 05:54
Name: amy
E-mail address: verdande@hotmail.com
a friend and i had the opportunity to sample absinthe while traveling in the czech republic. it's as nasty as all reports indicate, but it was a thrill to taste what i'd read so much about. for anyone who is interested in cultivating the herbs necessary to make absinthe--faux or distilled--www.hepting.com/thebot/ is a wonderful resource for starting a gothic garden or finding that medicinal herb normal nurseries never carry. the nursery ships live plants at reasonable prices, and their catalog is educational in itself. they also list a catalog of excellent reference books.
Fri Mar 13 10:19
Name: Lost Sailor
E-mail address: pcongen@epri.com
Regarding the recipe for distilling "true" Absinthe. The author does not give any specific temperatures for the distillation process. Distillation is a fairly complex process requiring specific temperature. There are a number of different types of alcohol and if your not careful you will poison yourself. The goal of distillation is to get Ethanol (EtOH - drinking alcohol) without getting Isopropyl (C3H8O - rubbing alcohol) and Methanol (CH4O - wood alcohol). Isopropyl alcohol will make you sick, but Methanol will kill you. During Prohibition in the U.S. many people died drink "bathtub gin" with Methanol in it. (They wer also using automotive radiators as condensers. The standard method of repairing these radiators was with lead patches. They were making a lead tincture!). I would highly recommend research on the distillation process, before any attempt at absinthe manufacture is undertaken.
Thu Mar 12 14:19
Name: AW
E-mail address: Awachtel@ljr.com
I can't find it anywhere. I've tried having a friend find it in Denmark (I heard they still sold it). No deal. How about a Portugal liquor exporter. Does anyone know anybody? E-mail me.
Thu Mar 12 13:32
Name: I'd rather not say
E-mail address: denley@mich.com
Excellent page! I am a poet and artist very interested in the effects absinthe might have on my work. I have the recipes, but I do need information on storage, filtering, sweetening, and where the ingredients would be available. If anyone could please email me with this information, it would be greatly appreciated. Please put "Hi Meg" or the like as the subject as I share an address with others.
Mon Mar 9 07:37
Name: marcelo savio
E-mail address: msavio@tba.com.br
wonderful page! parab╚ns.
Sun Mar 8 14:40
Name: Kiddo
Thanks, Kallisti. This is a great site. Keep it coming!
Fri Mar 6 17:18
Name: Kallisti
E-mail address: kallisti@sepulchritude.com
Homepage URL: http://www.sepulchritude.com
Pernod is indeed the same as the old Absinthe, without the wormwood, and is only about 80 proof. The sweetners were originally added to conteract the intense bitterness of the wormwood, but I am sure different manufacturers used different recipes with varying levels of sugar. When you come to New Orleans, you must try the local "absinthe substitute", HerbSaint. I think it is not quite as sweet as Pernod, and slightly more yellow in color. And it's only $12.99 a bottle. The Vieux Carré Wine Shop on Chartres Street always has some in stock. As for how these compare to commercial absinthes currently produced in foreign countries, I cannot comment, as it has been some years since I've tried any. They should be roughly similar, except, again, for the strength, as most commercial absinthes are about 120 proof (yow!).

Absinthe & its effects are purported to be cumulative and often permanent. Until further research is conducted, it is hard to say. Many of the effects complained about in days of yore were the results of extreme alcoholism, so as with anything, just keep your head on straight!

As for bars in New Orleans ... there is one every 2 feet. Avoid bars on Bourbon, except, of course, The Old Absinthe House on Bourbon & Bienville. There's also the Old Absinthe Bar, on Bourbon & Conti, which *used* to have the Absinthe Fountain (see Gallery II on this site), but they have recently redecorated as a tropical daiquiri bar (ack!), and have removed the old fixtures. Rumour is they will put them back in, but haven't done so yet. Local dive bars *I* recommend in the French Quarter are:

Monaghan's Erin Rose - 811 Conti (at Bourbon)
Molly's - Decatur Street (at Gov. Nicholls ???)
The Hide Out - Decatur Street (block down from Molly's)
< BR> It all depends on your crowd ... but these ought to get you started. And thanks for the book recommendation you posted earlier. Pharmako/Poeia is currently out of print, but I've managed to find a used copy online and will report back once the book arrives. Cheers!
Fri Mar 6 07:00
Name: Kiddo
On more thing: I'm going to New Orleans for the first time in a couple of weeks. Kallisti, I understand you live in the Garden District. Any suggestions as to must-see bars in New Orleans? Is the Old Absinthe House still operational?
Fri Mar 6 00:10
Name: Kiddo
Thanks, Lilith. I have no intention of drinking that much in one sitting. I thought that maybe long-term, moderate use of absinthe might cause some hallucination. It hasn't happened to me. Yet. And, if that's what it takes, I guess it won't happen. I have another comment: someone wrote that Pernod is absinthe without the wormwood. Can someone who has drunk both commercial absinthe (from Spain, for example) and Pernod with added wormwood please attest to this? I have tried an excellent home brew, and I have tried Pernod with the wormwood bitters, but I've never had real commercial absinthe. I found the home brew very bitter, much in need of the sugar cube. Pernod, I think, might be much sweeter now than it was before it ceased being "absinthe" and became "pastis." I find that sugar in Pernod is overkill. Any comments?
Thu Mar 5 23:24
Name: Lilith
E-mail address: lilith@exoskeletonrevolution.com
Homepage URL: http://www.exoskeletonrevolution.com

Kallisti has asked me to respond to the question posed by "kiddo", regarding hallucinations.

The answer is yes... One has to drink a vast amount of absinthe to reach the hallucinatory level... And I have done so only once.

But I must warn any of you against overindulging with any substance. Know the devil you play with.

I became violently ill after reaching the level where I did hallucinate. And I do not wish to ever get to that point again. And if you are expecting it to be as that of LCD or Mushrooms, you are wasting your time. It is nothing like that.

Enjoy this green potion of long ago... Just take care with the fairy... She can be the darkest of mistresses.

~Lilith~

Thu Mar 5 12:51
Name: Kiddo
Okay, everybody. You've drunk the stuff. Now. Has anyone actually had a hallucination? Not I.
Wed Mar 4 08:04
Name: simon
E-mail address: simonfb@aol.com
Homepage URL:
i was lucky enough to be brought a bottle back by a friend from Spain - made by Phillippe, and labelled "Le Vrai Absinthe" - it was 60% (120 US proof) and I believe it was the equivalent of ú7uk. It didnt go as cloudly as Pernod, Ricard etc and tasted a lot "fresher". It was not as sweet as Pastis but was not too bitter to drink unsweetened. As far as I am aware Absinthe was never outlawed in the UK as it was never really popular here. I have requested bottles from several friends visiting spain, but all have failed to find it - one guy phoned me from the liquor store!!! re ethanol - the Polish make a 80% vodka - that works well
Tue Mar 3 13:00
Name: Kallisti
E-mail address: kallisti@sepulchritude.com
Homepage URL: http://www.sepulchritude.com
The link you've all been waiting for! Here is a reliable shop where one can purchase *all* the herbs associated with Absinthe making: Equinox Books & Occult Supplies. Their front page takes a while to load, but be patient and follow the links to their catalog. They're speedy, competent, and recommended.

Now, in answer to the message posted previous to this one: Have you looked at this site at all??? Go on, take a gander ... I won't bite (usually).

I also neglected to answer the gentleman from the Czech Republic in regards to other ways of serving absinthe. The "Parisienne" manner was indeed to pour (or drip) ice water over a sugar cube on a slotted spoon that sat on top of a glass containing an ounce of absinthe. But there are many other varieties of cocktails out there. Benefit from my extensive research and check out the Cocktails & Recipes section of this site. Experiment... hey, and why shouldn't you, you have the real thing to play around with!
Mon Mar 2 16:39
Name: Vince
E-mail address: vmartone@idt.net
Hi. do you know where to get some absinthe? if not wormwood, and how to make it.
Sun Mar 1 16:45
Name: Kallisti
E-mail address: kallisti@sepulchritude.com
Homepage URL: http://www.sepulchritude.com
Warning! Warning!

Pure wormwood essential oil (or extract) can be very dangerous when abused. A nut from the UK did indeed suffer kidney failure (and other complications) after ingesting an ENTIRE vial of pure wormwood oil (probably a third or quarter ounce), thinking he would get an absinthe high. This is very wrong, bad & stupid. Bad, bad, bad.

That said, absinthe traditionaly contained approximately *2* drops of wormwood extract per ounce (roughly a shot glass full), which is WELL under the amount to send a guinea pig into convulsions. There are approx. 360 drops per third ounce, meaning the gentleman mentioned above could have ingested nearly 180 times the recommended dosage for a proper apéritif.

The method certainly works, as Pernod is only lacking the wormwood, just keep your head on straight when experimenting with unk
Sat Feb 28 09:55
Name: Rizla
E-mail address: Biznizy@aol.com
A friend recently gave me an ounce of wormwood oil extract, claiming that it could be mixed with Pernod to produce a drink similar to absinthe. Is this true? In what proportions should they be mixed? I'm a little worried about experimenting with the extract, after reading an article about someone nearly dying from drinking too much. Any advice or information would be greatly appreciated.
Sat Feb 28 09:13
Name: vmartone
E-mail address: vmartone@idt.net
Do you know where I can get wormwood? vm.
Fri Feb 27 11:03
Name: bmjsc
E-mail address: thanks but no thanks
Thank you for the information
Wed Feb 25 23:56
Name: Zipper
E-mail address: bytethis@ccrtc.com
Tres Magnifique
Wed Feb 25 22:02
Name: Grant Podelco
E-mail address: podelcog@hotmail.com
Just another note about absinthe drinking in the Czech Republic. Here they serve absinthe plain in a glass accompanied by a Bic lighter and sugar. You are supposed to take a spoonful of sugar, dip it in the absinthe, light the spoon on fire, let the sugar melt and then stir it into the absinthe. Anybody heard of this before? Is the standard way with a perforated spoon and sugar? Who has perforated spoons nowadays? What other ways are there to drink absinthe? Just pouring cold water into it?
Sun Feb 22 19:00
Name: Grant Podelco
E-mail address: podelcog@hotmail.com
Absinthe is legally available in the Czech Republic, where I currently live. It is made here with wormwood, of course. A famous cafe here, which first opened in 1881, the Cafe Slavia, features an original painting by an unknown artist called "The Absinthe Drinker" and features a cafe patron seeing a green-tinged hallucination.
Sun Feb 22 18:45
Name: Adam
E-mail address: StrawWhore@aol.com
I just was stopping in (actually, I practically live here!) and I figured that we owed a very large thank you to Kallisti! I mean, come on, who else do we know that can possibly be as beautiful and intelligent as her?! And besides, she's got red hair! Since I'm here again I figured that I'd ask if anybody here has actually tried any recipes that they can actually say that they are satisfied with. I still can't. But I rarely am satisfied with anything. Oh yeah. . . before I forget. . . I keep seeing different directions on preparation. I've tried both and they don't "seem" to make any difference, but I might be missing something. Should I be pouring water or absinthe over the spoon into the mystery drink? That's all for now. Bright Blessings and Bottums Up!
Sat Feb 21 20:02
Name: Kallisti
E-mail address: kallisti@sepulchritude.com
Homepage URL: http://www.sepulchritude.com
Oh yeah, regarding the Absinthe Spoons. I *don't* know of anyone who is reproducing them these days. You can get antique spoons, but they will cost you a pretty penny.
Thu Feb 19 08:03
Name: Kallisti
E-mail address: kallisti@sepulchritude.com
Homepage URL: http://www.sepulchritude.com
Purchasing, or attempting to purchase Ethanol (which is * pure* alcohol) is a sure fire way to end up on a government list somewhere. Unless you're a bootlegger, and get it on the blackmarket, there are *very* strict laws regarding the sale and purchase of Ethanol. Don't bother.

Absinthe Recipes #1 & 2 are not cocktails, they are a "steeped" liqueur, as opposed to a distilled liqueur, for which you would need a brewing still. Vodka is recommended because it is a clear, flavorless alcohol base. Those recipes will reproduce something "akin" to absinthe, without its clouding effect, etc.

Please note that I do *not* endorse these recipes, they are reproduced on this site as reference only.
Thu Feb 19 07:58
Name: Adam
E-mail address: StrawWhore@aol.com
I have a question. In regards to the recipes: Are the first two "absinthe" recipes using wormwood to create an actual form of absinthe, or are they simply using wormwood as a flavoring? A quote from the FAQ sheet that I printed up reads, "Wormwood is popular as a flavoring for vodka in sweden." Don't get me wrong, I love vodka! But I am not interested in making a cocktail drink. . . I'm looking for the real thing. I also was wondering how I could get my spectacularly greedy hands on some ethanol. I've searched both far and near, and to no real surprise have found nothing on my insatiable quest for it. If anybody knows any of the answers to any of my seemingly pointless questions, please, do tell! Bright Blessings and Bottoms Up!
Wed Feb 18 22:39
Name: Kiddo
Sorry -- Dale Pendell's book is not "The Poison Path." It is "Pharmako/Poeia." Like I said before, it is a great book, and it has a good discussion of wormwood and absinthe, along with a fantastic (tried & true) recipe.
Wed Feb 18 21:25
Name: Kiddo
If you want a good discussion of Absinthe, along with an excellent recipe, see The Poison Path, a book by Dale Pendell.
Tue Feb 17 14:26
Name: Adam
E-mail address: StrawWhore@aol.com
This site is truly brilliant and extraoidinaire! I've never seen such a compilation of facts on the highly elusive faery that rules over the intoxicating effects of absinthe. I dream of a time when the beverage will be recognized for what it truly is: a spiritually and mentally enlightening concoction. After the recognition we hope (not to place words into anyones mouth) that legalization is the next step. As I sat here and swept my eyes across the many pages laid before me, I found my mouth watering and a desire and craving such as I've never felt before. If you wouldn't mind, I'd love to speak with you sometimes. I am an adoring fanatic of your page (which I refer to as the absolute diversity of the wormwood simplified into acknowledgable facts) and I hope that you keep up the good work for all of our enjoyment! Bright Blessings and Bottoms Up!
Sun Feb 15 11:46
Name: melissa a alley
E-mail address: stoneronin@ aol.com
Homepage URL: http://none
opening a drinks shoppe in the following years looking for accurate complete recipes (yes IM aware that its illegal) not making it for public comsumption ... just want better recipes than the few i have the more historically accurate the better call me collect if you want to chat 904 3840096 my account will be inacctive for a while as i was stupid and let a friend talk me in to using a beta test of 4.0 aol and every thing will be lost but i am on line frequently as other screen names mel c.e.c.
Fri Feb 13 09:57
Name: The B
Does anyone have any idea where to get inexpensive (non- antique) absinthe spoons? Are they still made?
Wed Feb 11 17:57
Name: Kallisti
E-mail address: kallisti@sepulchritude.com
Homepage URL: http://www.sepulchritude.com
In answer to some of the more recent questions.

Availability:
The only countries (currently, and that *I* know of) where Absinthe is legas are Spain, Portugal & the Czech Republic. But you still can get Pernod, the original commercial brewer of Absinthe, at your local liquor store, but it contains no wormwood (or any of the other horrible things they used to put in it). It will not have the intensly bitter flavor of Absinthe, but in every other respect it is very like, and tasty to boot.

Availability of Ingredients:
The ingredients (such as wormwood and angelica) listed for the home brews can be purchased at your local herb shop, Wholefoods sometimes even has it. Or there are a gazillion online mailorder herb suppliers who will be more than happy to assist you. Just don't tell 'em what you're doing. I will eventually list some suppliers in my links section. Though potentially dangerous, wormwood itself is NOT illegal. Just be careful with it.
Mon Feb 9 18:17
Name: Nicolas Turrin
E-mail address: turrin@udel.edu
Homepage URL: http://www.microtec.net/~knuckles/knuckles.htm
Very dreamlike page. I'm a home brewer and it made me think of dabbling in the dark arts of Absinthe brewing, or going to the Czech republic and trying to there:). Keep up the good work!
Mon Feb 9 12:29
Name: matt kingsland
E-mail address: m.j.kingsland@herts.ac.uk
I had a most invigorating glass recently in Prague. Any ideas where I can get it closer to home? Cheers!
Mon Feb 9 07:07
Name: Sean Poole
E-mail address: 255-4671
I would like any information about absinthe recipes, and where I could go about finding the ingrediants. Send me any information you have.
Thu Feb 5 21:18
Name: jackass
THIS IS SOME NEW STUFF TO PLAY WITH!! WHAT IS THE STREET VALUE OF A BOTTLE OF THE STUFF? HOW DO YOU FIND THE ROOT TO MAKE IT? WHAT IS THE JAILTIME FOR POSESSION OF THE DRINK AND DO COPS CARE?? WELL ENOUGH WITH THE QUESTIONS LETS GET BREWING!! 2/3/98 JACKASS OUT
Wed Feb 4 12:06
Name: Kallisti
E-mail address: Kallisti@sepulchritude.com
Homepage URL: http://www.sepulchritude.com
In answer to the previous question, there is a site online called Absinthe Collectibles who sells Absinthe related paraphenalia, including spoons, glassware, & bottles. He does mailorder, so it may take longer than you have, but give it a shot!
Tue Feb 3 08:21
Name: Renee Paradis
E-mail address: rp117@columbia.edu
My boyfriend is an enthusiast of Alfred Jarry, and for his birthday, I'd like to purchase an antique absinthe bottle. I'm in Manhattan, have roughly 53 hours in which to find such a thing, and am desperate for suggestions. I've been going through the yellow pages for antique dealers, but any more specific information someone could give me would be wonderful. I'm also not at all adverse to buying a modern (full or empty) bottle if someone in the New York area has a spare (however doubtful). Thank you in advance for any help anyone can give me.
Mon Feb 2 23:48
Name: Raul Melo - Brazil
E-mail address: raulmelo@prudenet.com.br
A non common place site!
Mon Feb 2 18:09
Name: Rob "RobKnob" Knob
E-mail address: robknob@workline.com
fantastic site! I've been dabbling (dribbling? drooling?) in the fine art of absinthe production for a couple of years now... and don't appear to be suffering any ill effects... what's that? ... ah, the large insects have arrived, excuse me...
Thu Jan 29 13:36
Name: tien heestermans
E-mail address: everarts@zeelandnet.nl
Homepage URL: http://people.zeelandnet.nl/everarts
Hello, Nice to find so much information about Absinthe. On this very moment I show an installationbased on absint. It is an exhibition that will be the in the library of MIddelburg Holland untill 7 march 1998. Yesterday evening Madame Marie-Claude Delahaye of the Absint Museum in Auvers sur Oise (FRance) did a lectory on the subject of Absinthe on the occasion of my exhibition. The title of my show is : The Green Muse. I will soon add information about my last show to my homepage. Salut, Tien Heestermans
Sat Jan 24 13:39
Name: Lilith
E-mail address: lilith@exoskeletonrevolution.com
Homepage URL: http://www.exoskeletonrevolution.com
My dear Kallisti, I feel honoured to sign the guestbook of such a delightful woman. Your hard work and creativity on this site shows in every detail. You are a very talented artist. Your absinthe recipes are a wonderful gift to us all. Never have I seen such a diverse collection. Thank you for taking the time to share them. Je vous verrai bient┘t mon amie pr╚cieux... Lilith
Mon Jan 19 06:22
Name: Bink Verwayen
I'd like to thank you for the wonderful world you've disposed to me with your fabulous webpage on 'absinthe'. Not only does it contain some very useful information, the lay-out is in perfect harmony with the subject; green, leen, dangerously tempting.

thanks a lot, yours truly,

harry Verwayen, the netherlands
Sun Jan 18 20:22
Name: Paul Opel
To add to the Absinthe FAQ, I went to Portugal this last spring and brought back a lovely bottle of fine tasting Absinto- it is most definitely available there.

I was in Lisbon, and on the way to the airport I stopped at a liquor store near the University to get a couple of bottles of wine, and there was the Absinto on the shelf. 700 ml. was about US $7, and it was delicious. Made by Caves Neto Costa, it's 114 proof and quite sweet.

Cheers!
Sun Jan 18 20:13