Cost effective drip fountain found!

Sepulchritude Forum: The Absinthe Forum Archives Thru July 2001: Topics Archived Thru Feb 2001:Cost effective drip fountain found!
By Germanandy on Saturday, February 24, 2001 - 01:06 am: Edit

here is the other picture.
domingos fountain 2

By Petermarc on Friday, February 23, 2001 - 03:06 pm: Edit

yeah, andy that's the one, (actually there were two photos) at least YOU figured out how to post e-mail pictures now...it's a battery case, i believe...
domingo, it's now time to fill everyone in...

By Fluid on Friday, February 23, 2001 - 02:28 pm: Edit

Whose takin' orders?    

By Germanandy on Friday, February 23, 2001 - 02:13 pm: Edit

hi peter,
domingos fountain
is this the picture?

andy

By Petermarc on Friday, February 23, 2001 - 01:44 pm: Edit

uh, sorry...it's pretty cool, but i still can't figure out why i can't post my e-mail pictures...

By Petermarc on Friday, February 23, 2001 - 12:20 pm: Edit

for the benefit of all who wish to create their own absinthe fountain, i bring you 'moderne fountaine carré'
signed by 'domingo'fountain

By Ekmass on Friday, February 23, 2001 - 12:58 am: Edit

this is very interesting. Now I know what that white shit is that is all over my tea pot. It is damn near impossible to get rid of it. However, I have found that if I clean the pot right after boing water it comes away quite easily. Try boiling your metal items, might work.
EM

By Petermarc on Thursday, February 22, 2001 - 02:30 pm: Edit

this is the article that said 'the professionals
use a bath of fluorhydric acid for 30 or 45 minutes' they forgot to say 'DON'T TRY THIS AT HOME!' thanks for the advice, everyone...on not killing or maiming myself...acid

By Tabreaux on Thursday, February 22, 2001 - 01:28 pm: Edit

Forget HF. It will leave permanent scars (assuming you recover), and it will etch your glass (rendering it cloudy).

Soak the item in vinegar for a day or two.

By Heiko on Thursday, February 22, 2001 - 12:31 pm: Edit

Peter:

I forgot about this meaning of acid...might also make the calcium alive and try to steal your soul or something... ;-)
That was really a good laugh - I just realized the ambiguity when I read "...any acid,..." LOL

By Petermarc on Thursday, February 22, 2001 - 12:23 pm: Edit

ok, i'll forget hydrofluoric acid...no wonder everyone looked at me weird...the french sell alot of stuff to clean calcium deposits, they just don't work...

By Petermarc on Thursday, February 22, 2001 - 12:20 pm: Edit

i agree with the s. pellegrino...it's a part of my after gym routine, always grab a bottle on the way back home... smaller bubbles than perrier, more refined, good in an absinthe, too...i find badoit too salty and i like salt...heiko, as far as any acid is concerned, someone suggested
lysergic acid diethylamide, that i could watch the stains melt off the glass without touching it, but somehow, it doesn't seem like a good idea...and the glass only stays clean for about 12 hours...

By Mr_Rabbit on Thursday, February 22, 2001 - 12:08 pm: Edit

Petermarc, you probably don't want to be in the same room with hydrofluoric acid. The fumes can go through the top couple layers of your skin and burn you terribly. You won't be symptomatic for a while though, so you won't know you are burned right away, which tends to increase exposure. You can't feel it for hours.

That, and an exposure of sufficient strength will turn your bones as brittle as glass or just kill you. At least, that's what I remember from the Material Safety Data Sheet.

It's kinda wierd that with the water being that hard they don't sell deposit remover there.

By Lordhobgoblin on Thursday, February 22, 2001 - 10:18 am: Edit

In my opinion Badoit is most definitely the best tasting bottled water you can buy.

The best tap-water I've ever tasted is from County Down in Northern Ireland, the water originates from springs and rivers in the Mourne Mountains. When I lived there it used to baffle me why people would bother paying money for bottled water, what's the point I thought. Then I moved to London and I found out why. London water may not do you any harm but it sure tastes as hard and scaley as an alligator's arse, it took some getting used to.

Hobgoblin

By Heiko on Thursday, February 22, 2001 - 10:13 am: Edit

Petermarc:

I guess any acid would do against calcium-stains, wouldn't it?
Seems to be the European water - my tap-water here is also full of calcium (wherever some of it dries, a white spot remains). Makes tea and coffee taste bad, unfortunately...

By Timk on Thursday, February 22, 2001 - 09:31 am: Edit

Petermarc:
Whoa - i wouldnt get hydrofluoric acid anywhere near any glass objects, it reacts with glass, thats what they use to acid etch glass. Although very low concentrations may remove the deposits, I wouldnt risk it. Some dilute HCl left over night would do ok, but if you cant get hold of any, then I would wait untill you could.

Anyone think of any readily avaliable household substances that will remove calcium carbonate deposits?

If i remember, dont laugh, but www.anarchyrules.com has a household equivalency list for common chemicals

btw does anyone drink peligrino mineral water - very lightly carbonated - its the best tasting mineral water I have ever tasted

Tim

By Mr_Rabbit on Thursday, February 22, 2001 - 08:50 am: Edit

There is a girl I know, when I met her she was in 9th grade in high school.

She didn't know about the existence of the atom bomb. She knew there had been a world war two, and that Japan, the US and Germany had been involved, though she didn't know what side anyone was on. She thought the dinosaurs died out when the continents moved apart (that, in fact, they fell in the water and drowned. Y'know, that they fell off them speeding continents.)

So I used to toy with her mind.

We were all talking about the white cliffs of Dover for some reason. I mentioned these were chalk cliffs, which she didn't believe. So everyone else convinced her of this. Showed it to her in a book I think. That was when I told her about the blue cliffs of Dover (and the red cliffs, yellow etc,) where colored chalk comes from.

I also convinced her that the rainforests must be protected, because gasoline comes only from a certain vine that grows only there. My friends chastised me, and made me tell her the truth, which she did not believe on the grounds it was too fantastic.

Now, she's a hardworking single mom with a paralegal certification, and one of the most cynical, hardheaded people I know.
She has happily forgiven me...mostly ;-) Ah, memories...

By Petermarc on Thursday, February 22, 2001 - 08:48 am: Edit

i still put my water through a filter in paris, i can taste the difference and you wouldn't believe how many little rocks come through...the calcium is terrible here...many great toppettes, glasses and carafes are stained to the point that i don't know how to clean them...any ideas? unfortunately, i can't find/get lime-away, CRL, or muratic acid here (i read about hydrofluoric acid, but can't find that either)...i have tried salt and vinegar, coffee machine cleaner, bathroom calcium removers, etc. i have heard that people have used special tumbling machines to clean bottles, but don't know much of this technique...anyone who can find me an easily importable or local method of really cleaning these stains will be rewarded...

By Artemis on Thursday, February 22, 2001 - 08:16 am: Edit

"Plus, for darn near every home in the civilised world-sink included! No purchase necessary!"

And for those living in caves, stalagtite drippings will do. Or just leave the setup out in the rain.

"(Municipal water supply issues not to arise again please!)"

You should see the water discussions in the Home Brew Digest, with participation by real live water chemists, intense discussion of chemistry, insults, threats of murder, etc.

"living in Paris I drink the tap water, tastes just like the stuff they sell in the bottles
but it is a damn site colder."

One good thing about the tap water in Northern Illinois in winter, it's so cold you can't hold your hand under it for long. Chills a kettle of boiling beer wort to room temperature in no time at all.

"unfortunately the filters were made of asbestos
fibre..."

I once worked in an office where a guy who was good at bullshitting convinced a gullible girl that the white filters used in coffee machines are made of "rat fibers", from the fur of surplus laboratory mice.

By Heiko on Thursday, February 22, 2001 - 07:22 am: Edit

Bob,

I know, Germans are always freaking out about drinking water from the tap: another myth from pre-WWII times, or whatever. The water is absolutely drinkable, but Germans just don't do it... when we had some exchange students from the states at our school (some years ago), they had a heavy argument in a restaurant, because they wouldn't get water to drink. The only water the restaurant offered was freakin expensive mineral water from a designer-bottle, and they refused to give them tap-water - the Americans couldn't understand it, but German restaurants seem to make a hell lot of money from selling mineral water...

By Ekmass on Thursday, February 22, 2001 - 06:58 am: Edit

Welcome to the water forum. Anyone know where I can score some vintage Evain? On the other hand, living in Paris I drink the tap water, tastes just like the stuff they sell in the bottles but it is a damn site colder. For some reason French refrigerators manage to only get things just below room temp. Any thoughts on the quality of tap water here?
EM

By Absinthedrinker on Wednesday, February 21, 2001 - 08:22 pm: Edit

On the subject of fountains and healthy water, you will no doubt be aware that the original fountains had filters to remove lime scale, unfortunately the filters were made of asbestos fibre...

By Loucheliver on Wednesday, February 21, 2001 - 04:49 pm: Edit

Dilettante,
As regards portability, your sports bottle wins. I'll be using that method on my next camping trip. But, the sink fountain is a hands free operation! Just set it, and darn near forget it. Just gotta swap the cube form sugar w/cube form water when the sweet stuff has dissolved. Oh, and remember to shut it off.
Plus, for darn near every home in the civilised world-sink included! No purchase necessary!
(Municipal water supply issues not to arise again please!)

By Artemis on Wednesday, February 21, 2001 - 09:23 am: Edit

"Sorry, I had missed this detail. Being anal-retentive about water quality and content, when it's part of a craft, is quite understandible. Mea culpa."

I don't like the words "anal-retentive" as a surrogate for careful. Your point about driving a car is well taken, but my father died of bladder cancer and I'm convinced tap water had something to do with it. Would he have been more likely to die in an automobile accident? Maybe. Did he die an agonizing death? Yes. Could better water have prevented bladder cancer? Maybe. "Poison" may have been too strong a word for tap water, but I will continue to avoid it. Better safe than sorry, I say.

By Artemis on Wednesday, February 21, 2001 - 07:10 am: Edit

"IMHO, the best cheap fountain is a sports-type water bottle. The drink spouts are easily
throttled and the bottle can be stored half full in the freezer,"

DAMN! Now my secret is out. That's exactly what I use. Now if I could only find a serving wench like the one in my bio to squeeze my ... ah ...
bottle.

"I assume you can still mix it with nasty water if want to relive the "original absinthe experiance". If you are really into nostalga put on a french army uniform and turn the heat in your apartment way up."

LOL. I watched a French movie about WWI (Capitaine Conan) last night. One French officer tells the other he has a case of the shits. "Drink some Pernod" was the other's reply.

By Wormwood on Wednesday, February 21, 2001 - 04:56 am: Edit

If I remember correctly absinthe was invented to make nasty water safely drinkable. The French army used it all the time in Algeria. Alcohol to kill the germs, and wormwood to knock out the paracites.

I assume you can still mix it with nasty water if want to relive the "original absinthe experiance". If you are really into nostalga put on a french army uniform and turn the heat in your apartment way up.

By Lordhobgoblin on Wednesday, February 21, 2001 - 03:56 am: Edit

A piece of useless information about tap water. London tap water has been through the system so many times that the average glass of London tap water has been through 8 other people by the time you drink it. Yummy. Anyway there have been no reports of anybody becoming ill or dying from drinking it so it doesn't bother me.

Why worry about drinking tap water with a few additives? It won't do you any harm. A damn site more healthy than any sort of processed food or drink. Do you think Deva or Segarra are additive free and good for you?

If its the taste of tap water you don't like then fine pay for bottled water, but to drink it on health grounds is a waste of money, propaganda pumped out by the companies who make huge profits from selling it.

Hobgoblin
(PS I don't care if I've gone off the point)

By Anatomist1 on Tuesday, February 20, 2001 - 07:27 pm: Edit

Actually, when I used to be really into growing my own plants, I used to buy distilled water. I figured it was better than adding a buttload of lime or acid to the water, either of which might build up to problematic levels in the soil -- balanced or not. I killed some very exotic and expensive seedlings before I figured out the pH issues.

K.

By Dilettante on Tuesday, February 20, 2001 - 07:00 pm: Edit

IMHO, the best cheap fountain is a sports-type water bottle. The drink spouts are easily throttled and the bottle can be stored half full in the freezer, then refilled (from the tap or where ever), keeping the water cold for a number of rounds (that number being 3). They are portable, easily found, and, as I mentioned, the rate of drippage and amount of water added to the glass can be controlled very precisely.

By _Blackjack on Tuesday, February 20, 2001 - 04:05 pm: Edit


Quote:

My quest for good water started with beer making;



Sorry, I had missed this detail. Being anal-retentive about water quality and content, when it's part of a craft, is quite understandible. Mea culpa.

By Bob_Chong on Tuesday, February 20, 2001 - 09:33 am: Edit

When I was in Germany, my host family acted like I was a freak for drinking Leitungswasser. Same deal for all my American friends with their host families.

Mmmm--Rhein.

BC

By Heiko on Tuesday, February 20, 2001 - 08:54 am: Edit

Tap water sometimes really is not what you'd expect: in Germany there's at least no chlorine or fluoride in it, but I have been measuring my tap-water's ph-levels quite often (don't ask me why ;-)), and it was way above 8 (the test fluid was as blue as it could get, more than on the scale which ended at 8.5 - the test fluid was correct as far as I tested it with distilled water).
I didn't believe at first how much organic acids I had to put into my tap-water to get it to levels which are not deadly to sensitive plants...
So if you wonder why all the plants in your house look kind of dry and brown, you might get very far measuring the ph-levels and neutralizing it (beware - fertilizers often change the levels as well).
I really don't know why I know so much about growing plants... ;-)

By Tabreaux on Tuesday, February 20, 2001 - 08:03 am: Edit

Municipal water is subjected to chlorination/dechlorination in order to meet the FDA coliform criteria. Unfortunately, some muni water contains significant residual chlorine, and as far as beer making goes, let's just say that yeast don't care much for residual chlorine. I do not care much for water with residual chlorine myself, and the body doesn't either.

In the lab, we work with distilled water, deionized water, and even polished water. It is interesting how different truly 'pure' H2O tastes in comparison with the various waters you can drink from the tap and/or buy.

Mineral water is probably the best water you can drink for reasons of good health.

By Artemis on Tuesday, February 20, 2001 - 07:12 am: Edit

Ted, your points are well taken, I do consider those other things, but they aren't as easy to pick and choose as the water I drink.

My quest for good water started with beer making; it was when I got really serious about making good beer that I started requesting certs from the water utilities and the bottled water companies. But chlorinated water isn't suitable for beer making, period. And I don't like drinking it either. It's true reverse osmosis water contains no minerals, making it less than ideal for drinking OR brewing. I much prefer a quality spring water when I can get it. Plenty of minerals usually, but frequently too hard for making most beer styles.

By _Blackjack on Monday, February 19, 2001 - 03:14 pm: Edit


Quote:

If you are that concerned about the tap however, you should also take a good look at what you eat and where you live (i.e the house you live in, the air you breathe, etc.).



This is where my "less dangerous than driving" rule comes in. If something (like water purity, EMF radiation, aspertame, etc.) presents less of a danger to me than driving a car, I refuse to worry about it. Driving is far and away the most dangerous thing most people do, and they don't give it a second thought. The hazard presented by driving is my threshhold for acceptable risk.

By _Blackjack on Monday, February 19, 2001 - 03:08 pm: Edit


Quote:

I know exactly what I'm getting. I even obtain the water certs from the vendors when I'm doubt as to a certain mineral, etc. I have a ring-binder filled with them. You don't know what you're talking about, okay? Please let it go.



Geez, OK. If you'd said "I am anal-retentive about my water quality," in the first place, I'd have understood. I was speaking in general; I didn't mean to inmpugn the purity of your precious bodliy fluids. Those of us under chlorine-induced mind control can be a little slow...

By Tabreaux on Monday, February 19, 2001 - 02:56 pm: Edit

If you want to drink 'pure' water, drink distilled water. Since a significant percentage of your mineral intake usually comes from water, I suggest drinking mineral water if you aren't going to drink from the tap. If you are that concerned about the tap however, you should also take a good look at what you eat and where you live (i.e the house you live in, the air you breathe, etc.).

By Artemis on Monday, February 19, 2001 - 02:53 pm: Edit

"Which comes, most of the time, straight out of the municipal supply."

I'm not that stupid. I can read. I know exactly where the bottled waters that I buy come from. I've never bought one from ANYBODY'S municipal supply.

"There aren't any labelling laws."

I don't need any.

"Unless you're getting USP distilled, you have no
idea what you're getting."

I know exactly what I'm getting. I even obtain the water certs from the vendors when I'm doubt as to a certain mineral, etc. I have a ring-binder filled with them. You don't know what you're talking about, okay? Please let it go.

By _Blackjack on Monday, February 19, 2001 - 02:14 pm: Edit


Quote:

I'll take bottled water.



Which comes, most of the time, straight out of the municipal supply. It's not technically a foodstuff, so there aren't any labelling laws. Unless you're getting USP distilled, you have no idea what you're getting.

SELF CORRECTION:
It seems the FDA did start regulating bottle water in 1996, tho the standards are very vague. They do require that if it says "filtered" that it actually be filtered, but not necissarily for specific things...

Anyway, bottled water is, in general, no more pure than municipal supplies, and sometimes less so.

By Artemis on Monday, February 19, 2001 - 12:11 pm: Edit

Tight regulations, eh?

The water in the Southwestern corner of Michigan comes out of Lake Michigan. Their idea of "treatment" is to dose it with so much chlorine, bringing a cupful of it to your nose is not much short of sniffing a bottle of Chlorox bleach. This water meets the "tight regulations". I have never smelled any bottled water remotely like it.
The water in Louisiana comes out of the Mississippi River. Enough said. I'll take bottled water.

The number of home brewers who use water out of the tap in any municipality in the U.S. is I daresay miniscule, based upon the discussions I recall from the beer forums. This is because shitty tasting water makes shitty tasting beer. Whether or not it will poison you is another aspect that need not even come into the discussion. No absinthe makers I know of use tap water either.

FWIW I actually live in Illinois, where I buy reverse osmosis water for drinking and other potable purposes.

By Bob_Chong on Monday, February 19, 2001 - 12:00 pm: Edit

But Artemis lives in LA, so it is a wise choice.

By _Blackjack on Monday, February 19, 2001 - 11:52 am: Edit

Feh, the purity of municipal water supplies is more tightly regulated than bottled water.

By Artemis on Monday, February 19, 2001 - 07:51 am: Edit

Not to mention the water is quite possibly more chronically poisonous than absinthe ever was, filled with chlorine and who knows what.

I haven't drunk tap water in 15 years. In the house I now live in, with its old rusty pipes, the tap water is often brown to boot. Brown louche, anyone?

By Petermarc on Monday, February 19, 2001 - 06:16 am: Edit

Buyer Beware!
the sink fountain is real, but the spoons were originally used for coffee, tea or scooping out catfood...the ice tray is extremely rare as the french hardly ever use ice...

By Loucheliver on Monday, February 19, 2001 - 06:06 am: Edit

For sale: Rare and fine antique Absinthe Sink Fountain!! Hard to find stainless steel model is large and impressive!! Has unlimited water supply, variable water temperature, and infinite drip adjustment. Has "Kohler" (Belgian?) stamped on top. Don't be fooled by copies, this is authentic! Comes w/period ice cube tray in very rare blue plastic from French manufacturer "Tupperware". Shipping from my kitchen to anywhere in US w/insurance is $100 (this mother weighs a ton!)
at 9:05am seller added this information:
Real rare old Absinthe spoons?
Also to be included in sale: large collection of spoons found in drawer next to Absinthe Fountain.
Opening bid by one Mr. Wormwood is $200, no reserve.

By Wormwood on Monday, February 19, 2001 - 04:45 am: Edit

I belive that when I see you sell your "Absinthe sink fountian" on Ebay for $200

By Loucheliver on Sunday, February 18, 2001 - 03:11 pm: Edit

Tim,
Yeah, I forgot that part about running the tap to get the water nice and chilly. I wondered what all the fuss about the slow drip was until I gave this a whirl. It really does the job though. Using the ice cube after the sugar cube is gone, baby, gone, really kicks the louche into gear.
Hmmm, I'm getting thirsty!

By Timk on Sunday, February 18, 2001 - 08:49 am: Edit

I have been doing this for quite some time too - helps to run the tap for about 2 mins first so the water goes ice cold, works a treat!

Tim

By Loucheliver on Saturday, February 17, 2001 - 08:18 pm: Edit

Take your kitchen faucet, set it to the rate of "Ohmigod! That fucking faucet!!". Add a dosed glass w/spoon, and sugar. Enjoy to the point of the sugar being vapor, and sub an ice cube. Can take 10 mins depending on plumbing and analness of spigot adjustment, but damn well worth it!

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