L'Heure Verte 2001 Products Reviewed

Sepulchritude Forum: The Absinthe Forum Archives Thru July 2001: Topics Archived thru March 2001:L'Heure Verte 2001 Products Reviewed
By Bluedog1 on Saturday, March 31, 2001 - 08:53 am: Edit

Bob;

All food is to be appreciated, or why not just eat protein bars all day? It's the difference between someone who likes food and someone who appreciates food. A crab is just a crab and an oyster is just an oyster? One is pretty much the same as the next? Why marvel at New Orleans as a food venue at all? Can't you do the same thing at home?

Every food, from eggs to diner hamburgers should be sought out and appreciated. Not appreciating the hamburger in New Orleans is like saying a muffelatta is just another type of submarine (or hoagie), or a beignet is just a square donut.

After all, every bar is pretty much the same -- liquor in glasses, right? Why not search out the one witht he cheapest drinks?

By Bluedog1 on Saturday, March 31, 2001 - 08:46 am: Edit

Artemis;

Fair enough on the burger. I've had really good ones along I-81 in Pennsylvania in the right truck stops.

As for the gumbo -- our next get together will tell who ices down which bottle of what

I guess the group will benefit by having dinner and drinks!

By Artemis on Friday, March 30, 2001 - 06:37 am: Edit

"OK, Artemis;
Next outing in NOLA, my gumbo against yours. Losers buy the drinks. Blind taste test."

You might as well order a bottle of "Nouvelle" from Ted right now and chill it for me.

"BTW, a good hamburger should be nothing special."

I meant nothing special, as compared to other examples of its species.

" ... no chopped onions"

That's not a hamburger.

"Like good steak, good hamburger is a sensation not found in every diner."

On that we agree. I like diners, and I like the Clover, but I'm with Bob. If the Clover were alongside Interstate 80 in the middle of Iowa, I might have a different view of it.

By Bob_Chong on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 07:20 pm: Edit

A hamburger in N.O. is a wasted meal. Fuck the Clover. It's like ordering a Bud Light in Duesseldorf or watching TV in Hawaii.

Why bother?

By Bluedog1 on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 03:21 pm: Edit

OK, Artemis;

Next outing in NOLA, my gumbo against yours. Losers buy the drinks. Blind taste test.

BTW, a good hamburger should be nothing special. The taste of freshly ground meat, not too much spice, no bread inside, no chopped onions. Like good steak, good hamburger is a sensation not found in every diner. Clover is best at 3 a.m. when the grill is good and seasoned. (And the floor show is always fun.)

I have stopped at every little grocery between NO and Lake Charles to sample boudin. All a bit different, but no losers.

Personally, I'm sorry Pearl on St Charles above Canal closed. That was real food, great atmosphere.

By Artemis on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 12:44 pm: Edit

"I've watched Cajun food be trashed in the popular media by so-called experts, great popularizers of the next big trend in American dining."

The thing that frosts my ass is restaurants that dump in some cayenne pepper and label whatever swill they're serving up that way as "Cajun". I think "Cajun" has now been reclaimed, with the help of the Louisiana legislature, as sort of an "appelation controlee" (spelling?) to prevent people from making and labeling half-assed "Cajun" food products in that way.

"And now, thanks to them, the rest of the world thinks Cajun food is "Bourbon Chicken", "Blackened Catfish", "Alligator Sausage", "Turduckens", "Po-boys", etc, etc.... If I prepare a real Cajun meal for someone they usually don't know what to think!!!"

Precisely. I have the same trouble convincing people that Cajun food has nothing to do with too much hot sauce.

"Coo-bo-yon" (sp)

Courtbouillon, I think.

"Make something too hot to eat and it's suddenly Cajun-style."

Sorry, you said it first. I should have read your whole post before starting my reply.

"But if you want a real Cajun gumbo, see Artemis, or even myself. Or travel to SE Texas where it's far enough from NOLA that it hasn't been currupted by experts and "star" chefs."

A lot of real Cajuns in southeast Texas, for sure. That's thanks to the oil industry, I guess. My gumbo is actually a cross between what Momma used to make and Emeril's Turkeybone gumbo. It takes several days to make, because first I have to smoke a turkey (they're a bitch to light!) and send to Louisiana for some REAL andouille.

By Artemis on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 12:34 pm: Edit

"True. But Emeril is actually from the NE, so how could you tell if it changed from MA to LA?"

Touche.

"And I still assert that no one in N.O. says mar-onaise, as he does."

Agreed.

"Question: is yat derogatory?"

Depends on who's saying it I guess. You know the derivation, right? People say, "Where yat!" (Where are you at?). They of course are not asking about your physical location, but, as Frank Zappa said, your "conceptual continuity". I suppose people who don't like "Yats" use it in derogatory spirit, but it's probably a lot like "Coon Ass" for Cajuns. It was meant to be derogatory, but the Cajuns, in Borg fashion, assimilated it happily.

By _Blackjack on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 10:44 am: Edit


Quote:

Sorry Bob, your name (if it is your real name) doesn't sound Irish that much, is it maybe "McChong"?




In the original Gaelic, it was Mac Ciamhiodheannig...

By _Blackjack on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 10:35 am: Edit


Quote:

Then, because no ones clapping for him, he decides to "kick it up a notch" by adding a few hundred garlic cloves "BAM!" a little essence "BAM!"...BAM!



And a hit from the spice weasel...BAM!

By Malhomme on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 10:06 am: Edit

Artemis, you'll never get me to agree on Emeril.... But your last two posts are right on the money.

I'm as fanatical about food as most people are about religion. My stance on Cajun food is somewhat reactionary, I'll admit. I've watched Cajun food be trashed in the popular media by so-called experts, great popularizers of the next big trend in American dining.

And now, thanks to them, the rest of the world thinks Cajun food is "Bourbon Chicken", "Blackened Catfish", "Alligator Sausage", "Turduckens", "Po-boys", etc, etc.... If I prepare a real Cajun meal for someone they usually don't know what to think!!!

It just isn't like Razoos, or The Bourbon Street Cafe in the mall. Try finding in these places: "Paunce", "Cushcush", "Beef and Peppers", "Coo-bo-yon" (sp), "Squirrel Fricassee", "Gar Balls", "Gratons", "Cochon de Lait", "Hogs-head Cheese", "Mayhaw Jelly", or "Muscadine Wine".

Or try finding a REAL andouille in these restaurants, not Pepperage Farms sausage, or a Polish sausage someone dropped the pepper jar into. Make something too hot to eat and it's suddenly Cajun-style. Cayenne is Creole and French, but piquine is Cajun, and piquines go on to the table not into the chaudier de fer noir. If it burns twice, it probably isn't Cajun.

I can appreciate what Artemis is saying about Emerils food being New Orleans food, not Cajun. Many people don't recognize the difference, though to us it's glaring. My critique here is not so much with Emeril but with the Cajun-ization of "pop-food".

The popularity of this Creole and mall food has spilled-over into the western bayous and prairies of Louisianna. If you open a community cookbook you'll find cream-sauces, spice lists that include thyme and oregano, blackened this-or-that, Itialian-ized gumbos, etc.... It's the second Derangement.

I understand the role of cultural evolution in cuisine, but this crap isn't Cajun. It's often passed-off as traditional, when it was invented by some over-hyped "star" chef, or (worse yet) in some warehouse in Dallas.

But if you want a real Cajun gumbo, see Artemis, or even myself. Or travel to SE Texas where it's far enough from NOLA that it hasn't been currupted by experts and "star" chefs.

As I alluded earlier, this food is dumbed-down for American tastes. The Olive Garden is dumbed-down Italian food. Preserved smelt roe on spaghetti? don't even ask! At Bennigan's it's dumbed-down Irish pub food. Taco Cabana (and Tex-Mex in general) is dumbed-down Mexican food. Chinese-takeout is dumbed-down Chinese food, spiked with an addictive cocktail of corn syrup and fat.

It's like they're sayng "Which ethnic group do we want to exploit next?"

The amazing thing is how much this food tastes alike. I guess there are only so many ways to deep-fry a sandwhich.

Jim

By Zack on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 08:59 am: Edit

"rosengarten is obviously making fun of himself and snob-foodies..."

Yeah, Bob.

Maybe you just don't understand it all...all that is - Rosengarten.

By Petermarc on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 08:33 am: Edit

david rosengarten was the best on foodtv...i miss him...here in france we only get 'the two fat ladies'...i loose my appetite just watching them...they have an amazing way of making all dishes and ingredients look bad...ah, just in time to counter bob, rosengarten is obviously making fun of himself and snob-foodies...anyone who can recommend beer with caviar is ok in my book...

By Bob_Chong on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 08:28 am: Edit

Artemis:

Quote: "Cajun and Yat accents are not infrequently mistaken for Brooklyn and other Northeast accents."

True. But Emeril is actually from the NE, so how could you tell if it changed from MA to LA? I've seen old film of him when he was the young chef at Commanders and his accent was the same then as it is now. (But he did weigh about 50 pounds less than he does now.) And I still assert that no one in N.O. says mar-onaise, as he does.

You're right about Prudhomme--way too much going on to have any fun with cooking that stuff. And my point about cajun food vs. creole was said much better by you: cajun food is simple. (...whereas creole is often more frou-frou...)

Question: is yat derogatory? It seemed to be when I lived there, but I was a Yankee, so maybe it's one of those things like the "n word": gotta be one to use it?

BC

P.S. Zack: Rosengarten is intolerable. He is unfunny, and his pomposity makes him embarrassing to watch.

By Zack on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 08:08 am: Edit

Just for the record, I'm with you Artemis, I think Emeril is great. He's one of the few on FoodTV, that I have seen, that regularly incorporate alcoholic beverages into a segment. And Im not talking Ming Tsai (sp?) type segments ("This is a red wine from a wine shop."), Emeril actually gives good information on the stuff. Oh, that Rosengarten guy is good for booze info too (probably the best on FoodTV).

By Artemis on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 08:01 am: Edit

And Emeril's schtick is YAT, not Cajun.

A Cajun waitress will ask you if you want your roast beef poboy with MY-NEZ. They never heard of "mayonaise".

Justin Wilson's TV show was far and away the show that came closest to showing the preparation of legitimate Cajun food, which is very simple stuff. Paul Prudhomme's recipes with 97 ingredients are bullshit, and no Cajun I ever knew purposely burned any food until it became a trendy way to impress people from out of state.

By Artemis on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 07:51 am: Edit

BAM! is when your ass contacts the Canal Street sidewalk after eight hours of drinking Ted's tonic elixir. Emeril should be so lucky.

As to Cajun, my family tree goes straight as an arrow back to Grand Pre http://www.iscuo.org/acadiancajun/
so I'll say anything I want about Cajuns. Anybody don' believe me, dat's yo loss, cher.

Cajun and Yat accents are not infrequently mistaken for Brooklyn and other Northeast accents, I know because it happened to me many times in the service, when I still had a severe Cajun accent.

And the Clover cheeseburger is nothing special. Dairy Queen makes a better cheeseburger. There are probably 47 restaurants in Lafourche parish that make poboys that kick the crap out of anything in New Orleans. Almost ALL New Orleans food is overrated. You want good gumbo? Visit me. But only in the winter, it's too heavy for summer eating.

By Zack on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 05:25 am: Edit

"i can see it now,spoon in place above the glass,he begins to pour the water,while yelling BAM!"

Then, because no ones clapping for him, he decides to "kick it up a notch" by adding a few hundred garlic cloves "BAM!" a little essence "BAM!"...BAM!

By Aion on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 05:20 am: Edit

What is the best place in N.O. for real
authentic gumbo (not that tourist swill)?
A.

By Joshua on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 05:18 am: Edit

speaking of emril,im not sure if someone has posted this or not but the other day i saw him make a sazurac.he used herbsaint,but said you could also use absinthe,or pernod. i wonder if ermil partakes of the abs,i can see it now,spoon in place above the glass,he begins to pour the water,while yelling BAM!

By Bob_Chong on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 04:51 am: Edit

As long as we're name dropping about N.O., Domilise's makes the best shrimp po-boys and roast beef & swiss po-boys. The roast beef is a ten napkin sandwich.

BC

By Bluedog1 on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 03:56 am: Edit

Ahem! Sorry, I've been away, but youse guys are wandering into my territory (cooking) now.

Just a couple of points:

1. Measurements: Good cooks (chefs run kitchens -- cooks are different -- I am a cook, but a sous-chef) do not measure. Seasoning is done by taste, not by volume. For everything said, that's one point where Emeril, Mario, and many of the other TV chefs are getting it right and that's why you always see them re-season or adjust the seasoning before service.

2. TV Chefs: Face it, like Rock Stars, the TV chefs got there for a reason, and it isn't selling out. (OK, so your own brand of knives and cookware is selling out, but that's after the fact.) Emeril cooks good food and has novel approaches, which is how his restaurants got popular. They stay popular because of the TV show and the trendiness of his customers. For every Emeril and Wolfgang, there are a hundred chefs out there putting in time, running kitchens and making great food.

3. Restaurants: One of my major disappointments in New Orleans was walking by Brennan's at 6 a.m. and seeing them unloading frozen fish -- not iced fish, but frozen. That shows a clear move toward production, vice cooking. Commander's Palace will regale you with tales of how many meals they serve and how many reservations they take an hour. Production over food service. There are boatloads of good places to eat. As a consumer, if you really care about food, it is your job to find them.
Jerry D'Amato still makes the best debris biscuit in New Orleans; Kelsey's rocks for overall great food. Petunia's "Cajun Breakfast" is the best in New Orleans, and the Clover Grill has the best burgers in town. It's a shame, but most people wouldn't know good food if it bit them in the ass, hence the expansion of McDonald's and Burger King. Food, like good liquor and fine coffee (I'm a fan of Estate Java) needs to be sought out, savored, and lingered over.

Sorry. Rant Over

By Heiko on Wednesday, March 28, 2001 - 11:55 am: Edit

Hobgoblin,

I think maybe the British think they'd get a black eye from calling a German "hun" - I don't think so, I've never heard of this usage for "hun" before, and I don't see it very negative, I would classify "Kraut" a lot more offensive. Maybe because I'm not a WWI/II veteran?

It just occured to me, that -even the spelling totally different- "cannuck" is about equally pronounced as "Kanack(e)", which is an offensive term for Turkish people in Germany. I think it was derived from Turkish, where it just means "man" - but it's probably only coincidence that it sounds the same.

By Bob_Chong on Wednesday, March 28, 2001 - 11:38 am: Edit

Melinelly:

That's an odd distinction you make as a basis for dissing someone. Are being remembered and being influential the criteria for being good at what one does? By that logic, anyone short of Joshua Bell is just a "fiddle player"?

By Bob_Chong on Wednesday, March 28, 2001 - 11:33 am: Edit

LH:

Thanks for the etymology on hun. Much appreciated.

BC

By Bob_Chong on Wednesday, March 28, 2001 - 11:31 am: Edit

Emeril's schtick is not cajun. His accent is distinctly Fall River, MA (listen to him say "mar-onaisse" instead of mayonaisse: no one I know in N.O. ever said it that way). His family is Portugese, but he was born here. He's an American (and no more Portugese than Ted is a Frenchman).

Also, if anything, his food et al. is creole influenced, not cajun. Simply put, creoles were the richer, city "cousins" of the poorer, country cajuns. I know people could (will) quibble about the distinction; so be it. Also, I've heard someone (Paul Prudhomme maybe) describe the difference as: "a creole will use six chickens to feed one family, but a cajun will use one chicken to feed six families."

Use the "cajun" label sparingly, unless you want to signal to other people that you don't know what you're talking about.

BC

By Melinelly on Wednesday, March 28, 2001 - 11:28 am: Edit

i admit he's a world-class cook. but he's no chef. he's manipulated others' styles but brought little new into the realm. what will he be remembered for when he's gone? good food, sure, but how many cooks and chefs in the future will use his repetoire as a building block for artistic and culinary purposes, not as entertainers? more than anything else, he will be known for three letters:

B. A. M.

By Artemis on Wednesday, March 28, 2001 - 11:11 am: Edit

"actually, the proprieter of the biscuit house (a cajun) smirked when mentioning emeril's restaurant to us, and agreed with me when i laughed and said he's no chef, saying that many folks think the same down there."

How many of those folks are featured on Starchefs.com? Is the proprieter of the "biscuit house" on there? That's what I thought. A lot of boxers smirked before they got into the ring with Mike Tyson, too.

"Emeril is Portuguese. Isn't his whole cajun act just schtick?"

Probably, but so was Justin Wilson's. It could also be that he legitimately adopted the style of a culture he admired, either conciously or otherwise. I admit he is first and foremost (at least nowadays) an entertainer, okay? But to pretend that he isn't a world-class chef is ludicrous.

By Lordhobgoblin on Wednesday, March 28, 2001 - 10:58 am: Edit

Bob,

I think the use of 'Hun' as a derogatory term for Germans was invented by the British, before the Germans were vanquished in WW1. The British used it from very early on during WW1, before the Americans joined the battle. In Britain anyway 'Hun' is used in a very derogatory sense to describe a German (as 'Frog' is to describe a French person), unlike 'Yankee' which doesn't really have negative connotations. Call a German that to his face and you'd expect a black eye, it's a bit like 'Paki', 'Spic', 'Yid' etc. Probably doesn't have the same connotations in the USA.

The term 'Hun' has since been used by Irish Republicans as a derogatory term to describe the British army in recent years.

You're right, British sailors did actualy drink lime juice to ward off scurvy, hence the inoffensive slang term 'Limey'.

I've never heard 'Cannuck' before, I don't think any slang terms, exist in Britain to describe Canadians. I must use 'Cannuck' next time I see my Canadian cousins who have moved to Ireland.

Hobgoblin

By Marc on Wednesday, March 28, 2001 - 10:37 am: Edit

Emeril is Portuguese. Isn't his whole cajun act just schtick?

By Melinelly on Wednesday, March 28, 2001 - 10:36 am: Edit

actually, the proprieter of the biscuit house (a cajun) smirked when mentioning emeril's restaurant to us, and agreed with me when i laughed and said he's no chef, saying that many folks think the same down there.

By Artemis on Wednesday, March 28, 2001 - 10:29 am: Edit

"His touch is the touch of Bennigan's, Chili's, and the Cajun McChicken. "

PUH-LEEZ! http://starchefs.com/ELagasse/bio.html

"I find Emeril unbearable to watch. He's a self-satisfied blowhard with an annoyingly brasive style."

You better stay away from the company of Cajuns or Yats (white New Orleans working class) then. What you're seeing as self satisfaction and abrasiveness are merely confidence and exuberance.

By Aion on Wednesday, March 28, 2001 - 01:16 am: Edit

Bob,
FYI the first time you used "huns" was in your post dated 31.01.2001 on the "Chrysippvs review of Pontarlier Anis".
It was the answer to a - truly not very intelligent - post
of myself.

Apology accepted and thanks for clearing up the situation.
Maybe, as English is not my mother tongue, I don´t
see the eye-twinkling irony behind the words sometimes and confuse it with offending cynicism.
I promise to take things not that serious in the future!
Cheers to all Wermutbrüder (and of course Wermutschwestern) out there.
A.

By Bob_Chong on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 11:33 pm: Edit

British sailors reportedly consumed lots of limes to ward off scurvy. Or something like that.

And it's O'Chong. ;-)

I'm a mutt, actually. Names rarely tell the whole story in America (especially online). We are a mongrel people.

BC

By Heiko on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 11:20 pm: Edit

Sorry Bob, your name (if it is your real name) doesn't sound Irish that much, is it maybe "McChong"? - Just kidding.

I wouldn't be offended by being called a hun, I associate the term with someone strong, brutal and merciless - exactly the characteristics you need in our days to be successful ;-)

btw I never heard of "limey" - where does that come from?

By Anatomist1 on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 11:08 pm: Edit

Waitresses at truck stops call me 'hun'. I think it's kinda sweet, in a little ol' red vinyl sorta way.

K.

By Bob_Chong on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 11:07 pm: Edit

Heiko:

Merriam Webster's dictionary lists hun as a synonym for German. When I refer to huns, just about everyone would think that means Germans, not the Asiatic hordes of long ago. (Maybe it's one of those spoils of victory: Americans get to nickname those we vanquished? Just a guess, based on nothing but pure speculation...and I'm assuming that we didn't start calling you all huns until after WWII or at least after WWI.)

Don't worry about who's calling who a hun: I'm Irish.

BC

By Bob_Chong on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 11:04 pm: Edit

Sorry Aion--didn't mean to insult you with the "hun" term. I had always considered hun interchangeable with German. Kind of like yankee for American, cannuck for Canadian, limey for Brit, etc.

And I did not realize that I had used it "repeatedly." FWIW, I did a keyword search and found it only in this thread, used once.

Thus, for any usage of hun, imagined or real, I apologize. I will start saying kraut instead. Just kidding. ;-)

BC

By Heiko on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 10:59 pm: Edit

Don't be offended Aion, actually the Huns were from North Central Asia and were enemies of the Goths.
So who calls whom a hun?
;-)

By Aion on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 10:46 pm: Edit

"as opposed to a diminutive hun or whatever the fuck Puck is"

Bob,
Is there any good reason why you call people
from Germany and Austria (where Puck is from) huns repeatedly?
Don´t you think you are offending the forum members living in these countries?

By Loucheliver on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 06:25 pm: Edit

Re: Iron Chef floor announcer Ohta. He says "Fukui-san", the lead commentator's name is Fukui. Who cares? Probably nobody.

By Marc on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 04:27 pm: Edit

Emeril may be spreading himself too thin. Years ago I had a wonderful meal at Nola. Recently I ate in Emeril's Vegas restaurant in the MGM Grand. It was abysmal. One of the worst meals I've had in a long time. Totally unworthy of a worldclass chef.


As a television personality, I find Emeril unbearable to watch. He's a self-satisfied blowhard with an annoyingly abrasive style.

Alot of Emeril's recipes are stolen from Paul Prudhomme's cookbooks.

By Malhomme on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 03:45 pm: Edit

Actually, Artemis, I'm baffled by *your* post. Entertainment aside, any REAL talent Emeril has as a cook comes from Marcelle Bienvenu. He cooks from beneath *her* apron. His touch is the touch of Bennigan's, Chili's, and the Cajun McChicken. Truly, I'm baffled that anyone could like his food. Not to get on too high a horse, but he is to our cuisine what The Olive Garden is to Italian cuisine, Taco Bell to....

Jim

By Artemis on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 01:19 pm: Edit

I'm baffled by anti-Emerilism. He is far and away the best entertainer on Food TV, and they know it; that's why he gets prime time and top billing. It IS entertainment, right? But he's also a damn fine cook.

If memory serves me correctly, Emeril was born in Fall River, Massachusetts, but he lived in New Orleans for quite some time, cooking at Commander's Palace. New Orleans obviously rubbed off on him, as evidenced by his "Yat" accent, the Zap potato chips, the Abita beers, etc.

As for measurements, it's pretty obvious he can cook without them, but if you need them, all you have to do is go to the website and download the recipes. I have prepared many of Emeril's dishes and have never been disappointed. His Turbodog Cabbage, for one, is magnificent.

As for the Iron Chef, it is strictly entertainment, being pretty useless for teaching anybody to cook anything. What the high-pitched weasel is actually saying is "Sukata San" (Mr. Sukata) or suchlike. It's probably not Sukata, but someother family name that starts with "S".
The title of the show might as well be "Let's see who can make something edible out of nasty ingredients in 60 minutes or less". The main ingredient is always some offal such as octopus, eel, sea urchin, etc. In Cajun country, that stuff is bait, not supper. The last time I saw The Iron Chef, I said to my significant other, do you think they'll ever make something out of a cow? Only if it's oxtail, she answered. Then Mr. Pepperbiter unveiled the evening's ingredient - OXTAIL!!

"Ancient Japan was one strange place" - paraphrased from the movie "Ghost Dog". Well, it hasn't changed much, and I say that with considerable affection, having lived in Japan for almost three years. And although the show is dubbed on Food TV, it sounds like the voice overs are done by Japanese, so the flavor is retained.

By Malhomme on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 10:52 am: Edit

Emeril is a yankee and a fraud.

Jim

By Zack on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 10:49 am: Edit

Giving my dumb-American opinion of Puck - "I don't like him because I can't understand a goddamn thing hes saying!" Is that a "Pizza" or a "piece of"??

By Bob_Chong on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 10:45 am: Edit

Emeril is also trying to crack the Wolfgang Puck market by whoring his name to a variety of products. He made achieve more success at it than Puck, since E is directly going to the lowest common denominator. Plus, being a big, jolly American can be an asset, too (as opposed to a diminutive hun or whatever the fuck Puck is).

BC

By Melinelly on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 10:40 am: Edit

true... but "americans" make some bad choices hehe, just look at the best selling beers, fast food joints, and the two largest political parties =)

By Zack on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 10:39 am: Edit

Yeah, Emeril is much more a star than a chef...according to what the FN would have us believe. Anyway, at least he drinks TurboDog! And, I do hope to eat at one of his restaurants one day.

By Bob_Chong on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 10:33 am: Edit

Melinelly:

Have you ever eaten at one of their restaurants, though? I went to NOLA a couple times about ten years ago, when I lived in N.O., and once about five or six years ago on a visit. I had an amazing dish: home cured duck with a cane syrup reduction sauce served over sweet potato and pecan ravioli. But serving yummy food and entertaining on TV are two different things, so we are in agreement. However, people love the shows you mentioned, and TVFN pays Emeril something ludicrous to do his stuff--in the several millions (it was printed in Parade and I remember being floored by how much he was raking in, but can't remember the exact number).

BC

By Melinelly on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 10:31 am: Edit

that seems to be the trend now. many many cooking show chefs no longer give the measurements... probably to get you to go out and buy their latest book. i don't really watch shows for precise recipes though. i watch them for ideas. people always give me crap for watching people cook meat while i'm a vegetarian, but hey, cooking's cooking. i'll probably learn something no matter what the medium. heh.

"snap into action" there's another cooking show phrase that used to get on my nerves, but i actually like nick stellino's shows despite (or perhaps because) how cheesy they are... and besides, he's so cute and cuddly how could you hate him? hehe.

By Zack on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 10:23 am: Edit

Yeah, Emeril Live is an exploit of capitalism. However, when looked upon from a purely entertainment standpoint it is a great show. Yeah, hes not really teaching us about making anything (he gives us no measurements!)...BAM!

Lets kick it up a notch...

By Melinelly on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 10:14 am: Edit

Emeril Lagasse and Bobby Flay... two "chefs" i would prefer to cook than watch cooking.

By Bob_Chong on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 10:08 am: Edit

Zack:

Emeril's old show was much better. I actually picked up a few tips and recipes from watching that show. The live show blows, though: it is full tilt, ignorant self parody. I prefer the teacher mode of the old show versus clown mode of the live one.

BC

By Zack on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 10:03 am: Edit

HAHA! You have not heard the dubious dubbing of the Food Network!? It is very comical at first, some people can't get past it. However, after you adapt your hearing to the show its very entertaining. Except for the judges interrupting with that word that sounds like "squeeze-on". I assume it means excuse me, but it really gets on my nerves, since eveything else is in English...

By Heiko on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 10:00 am: Edit

I had some Balinese (Indonesian or Java? It said "Bali Kopi") coffee once, it was pretty good. Only you couldn't compare it much to filter-coffee, because it was ground very finely for preparing it the Bali way: Just pour cooking water over it, wait until the powder has settled, then drink it with much sugar. It's more kind of Espresso style, very strong, and you get to swallow a lot of the powder...
I think I mixed most of it into European filter coffee to prepare it in the machine.

By Melinelly on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 09:57 am: Edit

the only thing i don't look forward to watching iron chef on food tv is that i've heard they dubbed all the episodes. i've only seen the original japanese (some of them subtitled), and i can't imagine hearing any of their voices as some english speaking smeg head... especially this one commentator who has this incredibly fast high pitched voice... he sounds like a weasel on crack, it's hilarious!

By Zack on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 09:50 am: Edit

I have not tried the Blue Mountain beans yet, however, a few years ago when I was on a cruise ship (we had a port in jamaica), the Blue Mountain stuff was a popular item. I will post back with my reviews of the coffees I have left over (with name)... just for you Melinelly.

Kaga Takeshi is that "weird cat who hosts the Iron Chef competition." (go to www.ironchef.com) This show is awesome, the best that the Food Network offers. Ok, I don't want any Emeril fans bashing me, he is great too, but who wants to make all that stuff he does? Iron Chef is great to watch after you have downed a few absinthes also!

Zack

By Melinelly on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 09:46 am: Edit

that's 10 points to Artemis! god i love that show. i wish they still aired it on tokyo tv here =( i'm very tempted to get a dish just so i can watch it on FoodTV! screw having hundreds of channels to choose from, i just want ONE.

i agree, i definitely prefer Sumatran to jamaican. there was a really nice guatamalan roast i had years ago too... but overall, tropical countries seem to produce coffees with flavors i prefer.

By Artemis on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 09:24 am: Edit

"if memory serves me correctly... (ten points to anyone who can tell me where i took that quote from)"

That weird cat who hosts the "Iron Chef" competition, the one who wears Prince garb and likes to take big bites out of raw bell peppers.

By Artemis on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 09:22 am: Edit

The best coffee I ever tasted came from Sumatra.

It's called "Sumatra Boingy". "Boingy" is not really how it's spelled, but that's how it sounds. I thought it was way better than Jamaican coffee. It's very expensive, though. There is very fine coffee from Hawaii and Africa also.

By Melinelly on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 09:19 am: Edit

i used to get coffee from gevalia, but since i don't drink it daily, my freezer began to fill up with little cartons LOL...

however, if memory serves me correctly... (ten points to anyone who can tell me where i took that quote from)

my favorites were the Blue Mountain and some pacific island one Javanese? something like that i can't remember. i'll have to peek in my freezer when i get home and see if i've got any left. of their regular brews and blends, i liked the Stokholm blend, and would often cut it into some of the more expensive offerings in order to stretch them out. worked pretty well.

By Heiko on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 08:59 am: Edit

Zack,

when you drink selections of coffee from around the world - have you tried Blue Mountain from Jamaica? I haven't, but I would like to, only the extraordinary price kept me from doing it...
According to a review I've read, this must be the E. Pernod of coffee.

By Malhomme on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 07:27 am: Edit

I too am only an egg.

Jim

By Don_Walsh on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 06:26 am: Edit

You made those mistakes honestly and deserve no approbrium for them.

Live long and prosper, water brother! (if I can mix a couple sf metaphors.)

By Zack on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 02:58 am: Edit

I'm not really a coffee geek, but I drink between 8 and 13 cups a day, so I think I can speak. Although I do not add anything to my coffee, the type of grounds I put in the machine are really important. I get that Gevalia stuff in the mail, and while I can't say it is the best stuff, there are some good selections. Theyre sending me selections from different parts of the world right now (most of it is crap), but there is one from Spain that I just can't stop drinking. Unfortunately, this spanish blend will run out tomorrow and I will have to revert to "Glockenspiel" and the rest of the European swill. Anyway, I guess the point is just try different stuff...I know a couple weeks ago I wouldn't have even thought about Spainish coffee beans.

By Petermarc on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 02:12 am: Edit

don't know about cardamom, but another popular middle east/north african addition to coffee is 'fleur d'orange' (orange flower water)a couple of dashes (i prefer more) gives the coffee a heady perfume and cuts the bitterness like crazy...i'm hooked on it...

By Bob_Chong on Monday, March 26, 2001 - 08:20 pm: Edit

Great reviews--makes me anticipate the release even more.

As for cardamom in absinthe, it sounds great.

I've recently been adding cardamom to my coffee beans before grinding for espresso. If you have never had coffee this way, try it. It's wonderful. I got the idea from seeing a bag of coffee in a local market labeled as "Brazilian coffee with cardamom." It was Lebanese. Having both beans and cardamom at home, I didn't buy any of the stuff at the market but have been experimenting at home with what I've got. Apparently, this is popular in the middle east. Any coffee geeks care to help out?

Thanks.

BC

By Artemis on Monday, March 26, 2001 - 05:08 pm: Edit

"the edouard ... a lemon-lime soda kind of smell"

YES!

"... the nouvelle orleans has a nose of gingerbread"

YES!

The samples are still here next to my computer as I read Peter's comments, so I opened them up again and I agree. Why didn't those similes occur to me? I see why Ted so much enjoys reading the reviews.

By Petermarc on Monday, March 26, 2001 - 04:06 pm: Edit

the edouard is indeed a nice drink, i find the nose to have a lemon-lime soda kind of smell, after the absinthe over-tones, inviting and seducing at the same time...it finishes fresh, little light and short on the finish and i prefer it with a little sugar...the nouvelle orleans has a nose of gingerbread, but more like 'pain epice'here in france, like gingerbread but with orange, more fragrant, a little clove, a little longer finish...excellent examples, both of them, i look forward to tasting the others...

By Artemis on Monday, March 26, 2001 - 01:19 pm: Edit

This review is based upon what I *think* I remember Ted telling me about the products, and a sampling I did at home some two weeks after Ted's party in New Orleans.

Most importantly, Ted's absinthe resembles nothing commercially available at this time. And I mean nothing. It most closely resembles bootleg products made by one or two extremely capable individuals whose product I've been fortunate to sample. This is not surprising, since those people are following the same path as Ted, albeit without his experience and resources. Ted's stuff demonstrates that he has completely mastered the basics to the extent he can now tweak and fine tune to produce attractive variations, and I can think of nobody else in the world who is at that level. There is certainly no commercial absinthe that can touch it. All of it is fragrant, dry, clean, non-oily and non-anisey. All of it has all the "effects" you want from absinthe. In a word, it's good.

Okay, my taste test was done with La Fee as a "control", so to speak, and the four products Ted unveiled in New Orleans.

Edouard: A reproduction of Edouard Pernod absinthe. Color yellowish green. Considerable turbidity. Smells quite a bit like La Fee, but brighter, cleaner. Obvious wormwood presence (this is true for all samples). Louches respectably, but not thick and white like the products with tons of star anise (Mary Mayans, etc.), which is to be expected. It has, however, the most dense louche of the four products. Tastes like a sweet herbal flower tonic, finishes really dry in the throat with a pleasant lingering bitterness, a lot like a good India Pale Ale.

Pontarlier: A reproduction of Pernod absinthe as it was some time after the move to Pontarlier, when the recipe had changed, if I remember what Ted told me, because the availability of herbs had changed. Same color as Edouard. Darker smell than Edouard, and more thickly fragrant. The signature herb in this one seems to be something funky, grassy, vegetal. I almost want to say Valerian, but that smells like fermented gym socks. It's not nearly *that* powerful, but the overall effect is, this one is definitely funkier than the Edouard. Has the second densest louche of the lot. It tastes like it smells - Edouard with a funky edge. This is my least favorite of the four.

Nouvelle: A reproduction of Herbsainte. Darkest green of the lot, although still peridot green, nothing like the (artificial) emerald of La Fee. Slightly turbid. Has a sexy, musky smell, finer and more elegant than the previous two, almost feminine. The more I stick my nose into it, the more I perceive cookies (cardamom?)!. Probably the weakest louche of the lot, although a better color, white/opal as opposed to yellowish. Tastes like a sharp/silky wormwood lollipop. This is my favorite. Closest in the lot to La Fee, or what La Fee ought to be. If Ted's stuff is historically accurate, and I have no reason to believe it's not, I would have to say Herbsainte was a *refined* Pernod, and a better product. Certainly one I would prefer to drink.

Gorgon: Clear. Clove. Gorgon screams clove. I understand Adam suggested this signature herb. Is there a Kretek connection (Indonesian clove cigarettes)? It smells and tastes like clove, medicinal, sharp and bright. The taste is almost smokey. The smell even lingers in a washed shot glass that was used to apportion it. The weakest louche of the lot, but then it has no color to help the density. It may be a niche product, but it's very good, refreshing and powerful.

La Fee: I wrote here a few days ago that no La Bleue is better than La Fee. I was wrong. I made that post having not tasted La Fee side by side with another absinthe since the La Fee/Deva test I did to debunk the La Fee = Deva claim last year.

What a revelation!! Last year, when I wrote my glowing review of La Fee, Don Walsh wrote to me privately, saying La Fee was "overcooked". At the time, I didn't have a grip on what overcooked (distillation pushed too far) tastes like but now I do, and La Fee is indeed overcooked. It's not as bad as Deva, but it's bad enough to make it hard to swallow next to clean products. It fails so obviously next to Ted's product (and next to the latest quality bootleg I've had as well) that I'm embarrassed I reviewed it so favorably and responded so sharply to Don's critique of my review back then. But live and learn. I've played an absinthe expert on the Internet so long now that I've actually learned enough to live in danger of becoming one.

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