Flaskbottom

Sepulchritude Forum: The Absinthe Forum Archives Thru July 2001: Old Topics Archived Thru Sep 2000:Flaskbottom
By Marc on Friday, August 25, 2000 - 01:19 am: Edit

let me try that again.

Gee, I thought flaskbottom is what you got when you sat down on your flask.


Nothing worse than having to repeat a joke.

By Marc on Friday, August 25, 2000 - 01:00 am: Edit

Gee, I thought flaskbottom is what you got when you down on your flask.

By Luger on Thursday, August 24, 2000 - 09:23 pm: Edit

>there you go..when he emerges from the shadows he >is bursting with information

Welcome back Absintheur, you have been missed!

So a Pontel is the almost even bit where the glassblower has cut off the flask, and the kick-up is the thing that is highly visible, and I was actually asking for?

Anyway, thanks for your thoughts!

Best regards: Luger

By Tabreaux on Thursday, August 24, 2000 - 01:42 pm: Edit

I suppose opinions on this subject do differ. I do know that if someone dropped a bottle in my face from trying to pour it like that, I'd probably 'punt' them across the room.

By Lurker on Thursday, August 24, 2000 - 12:22 pm: Edit

http://www.intowine.com/champagne2.html
In champagne it's called a "punt:"
"The correct way to pour a bottle of champagne is to
hold the base firmly in one hand with the thumb in
the punt and the fingers spread out along the barrel of
the bottle.

By Tabreaux on Thursday, August 24, 2000 - 10:31 am: Edit

I've always been told that this was an improper way to pour champagne, and It has never been served to me poured as such. Many 'kick-ups' (which vary in depth) are not recessed enough to pour it or wine that way anyway. I've assumed that the pontil was recessed so that the bottle would stand up without tipping over as a result of an uneven surface of the 'unground nubbin'. I say this because I have encountered some antique bottles with no recess, and they are a bit unsturdy when standing up.

By Midas on Thursday, August 24, 2000 - 10:08 am: Edit

...yet another snazzy trick to impress your friends, care of the friendly folk(occasionally) at la Fee Verte...

By Chrysippvs on Thursday, August 24, 2000 - 08:44 am: Edit

there you go..when he emerges from the shadows he is bursting with information

By Absintheur on Thursday, August 24, 2000 - 08:40 am: Edit

"It is called a Pontel. I am not quite sure the exact purpose but I think it was for both storage and so that the bottlers did not have to put quite a liter of liquid in the bottle."

In fact, a pontil is an unground nubbin at the base of a blown glass piece where the blower snapped it from the punty.

The feature that you're referring to is generally referred to as a kick-up, and it's intended for practicle ends. Kick-ups are added for ease of use -- the pourer inserts one thumb into the kick-up and pours holding only the base of the bottle (ie. the manner in which Champagne is poured). The deep kick-up allows you to pour ellegantly from a bottle of virtually any size without gripping the neck.

By Chrysippvs on Thursday, August 24, 2000 - 08:13 am: Edit

Luger,

It is called a Pontel. I am not quite sure the exact purpose but I think it was for both storage and so that the bottlers did not have to put quite a liter of liquid in the bottle.

I am sure there is some much cooler reason but that is what I gather.

J

By Luger on Thursday, August 24, 2000 - 04:26 am: Edit

Hi friends!

When I look at pictures of vintagebottles, I can see that there is a "bulb" on the bottom, which goes up a bit in the bottle. Roughly coneshaped.
( Hard to describe ).

I have seen this in some winebotles also.

I wonder what the purpose is? Just tradition and looks?

Any winelover out there who knows :-)

Best regards: Luger

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