Archive through October 8, 2000

Sepulchritude Forum: The Absinthe Forum Archives Thru July 2001: Topics Archived Thru Dec 2000:Montana absinthe:Archive through October 8, 2000
By Jan on Sunday, October 08, 2000 - 08:53 am: Edit

Tom,

thanks for that piece of information.
It further supports the impression that
Tunel is one of the brands that better
is ignored.

Jan

By Bluedog1 on Sunday, October 08, 2000 - 08:32 am: Edit

Jan;

I've got a bottle of Tunel on my sideboard that I'm either not going to touch again or give to uneducated strangers. It is with out a doubt the worst of the absinthes I have tried. It tends to be a bit strong in the anise flavor, it seems to give me acidic "burps", it doesn't louche at all, doesn't drink smoothly and doesn't finish well. I've had about four glasses from this bottle and all were about the same experience. It also is the first absinthe to give me a headache.

For sampling purposes, just try someone else's open bottle, don't spend the money yourself on a whole bottle.

By Midas on Sunday, October 08, 2000 - 06:08 am: Edit

Bob, I'm with you! Three separate friends have now placed orders with SC because they came over to my place to try 'Robert's absinthe' as it's reffered to (the ability to purchase absinthe on line isn't very well known here), and loved what they tried.
Hey, maybe we could get a commission or something...hmmm...

By Artemis on Sunday, October 08, 2000 - 06:08 am: Edit

Fellraven wrote:

"I appreciate that in numbers of producers, the micros are many and varied, but from what I gather the majority of American beer drinkers are unaware of them or uninterested in their warm, flat British beers :)"

You gather correctly, although as Bob pointed out, the good beer revolution in the U.S. is 15 years old (a little older, actually) and the micros have made some inroads. It's difficult to teach Bud/Coors/Miller drinkers to appreciate cask ale ("warm" and flat), but not difficult at all to hook them on a quality microbrew that's more in the style to which they're accustomed (some carbonation, etc.), at least for one drinking session. When they're back behind closed doors, most of them no doubt backslide, but in their defense, the microbrews are MUCH more expensive than the national swill, don't travel well, and aren't broadly distributed unless they have national aspirations, and then quality usually quickly suffers. "Think globally, Drink locally" is a sign you often see posted in a U.S. brewpub.

By Jan on Sunday, October 08, 2000 - 06:01 am: Edit

Hi,

has anyone apart from Justin's friend in
Bacelona ever had the opportunity to taste
this infamous Tunel absinthe, or any other
Spanish brand currently not being reviewed
in the buyer's guide? I'm looking for rare
to find stuff, so any hints would be of value.

Thanks,

Jan

By Bob_chong on Sunday, October 08, 2000 - 12:30 am: Edit

I took a bottle of Montana to a party tonight and turned a bunch of people on to absinthe. Pretty cool. I wonder is SC will give me some kickbacks now? ;-)

BC

By Fellraven on Sunday, October 08, 2000 - 12:03 am: Edit

Artemis, all

When I said "most" I was referring to sales/volume, as produced by the handful of mega-breweries for mass consumption.

I appreciate that in numbers of producers, the micros are many and varied, but from what I gather the majority of American beer drinkers are unaware of them or uninterested in their warm, flat British beers :)

By Bob_chong on Saturday, October 07, 2000 - 06:27 pm: Edit

Artemis:

The Goose rules, hands down. I've had nothing but great beer there (only been to the Clybourn location). Whenever I am in Chicago, I always stop by.

BC

By Artemis on Saturday, October 07, 2000 - 04:29 pm: Edit

"Artemis, im not from the US, im from the Uk, and as I have never got around to drinking USA beer - this may be the cause of the difference in opinion - have you tried proper English beer - is there much difference to American beer? i would imagine so from some of the bottled stuff i have tasted - anyone know ?"

I've tried a lot of the English beer that's made its way to the U.S. All the common stuff, such as Bass, Whitbread, etc. Some slightly more exotic stuff such as Bishop's Finger, etc. I was priveleged to attend the Real Ale festival in Chicago a couple of years back - British cask ales were fairly well represented - one in particular I enjoyed was Timothy Taylor's Landlord Ale, and another I think was called Bluebird Bitter. Generally, I like English beer very much. Some small U.S. breweries make cask ale in the British style (low carbonation, served at "cellar temperature", etc.), but it's by no means common nor enjoyed by your average U.S. beer drinker.

"Most American beer is akin to British mass-produced keg lager."

It's dangerous to make generalizations, as I no doubt am going to find out due to my wine remark. The remainder of Fellraven's post isn't far off the mark. Bob Chong did an admirable job of correcting the record. The *best-selling* U.S. beer is indeed crap. But there are a hundred U.S. breweries producing beer that's the equal or better of anything on earth. Goose Island in Chicago is a shining example.

By Artemis on Saturday, October 07, 2000 - 04:16 pm: Edit

"artemis-
them's fightin' words..."

Yes, but some fruitful discussions have arisen out of just such words here lately :>).

"would you be so kind as to go into detail why you
think "virtually all wine is nasty","

I dare not, for fear of showing my wine ignorance. I just don't like it. I like sake pretty well, but that's more like rice beer than wine. I've had mead that I liked, but mead is hard to find in the U.S.

"or is that not a subject that should be discussed in this forum?"

I think it would be tolerated if it were confined to a "wine" thread. I'm all for it.

"i may be able to give you some suggestions that
might change your mind...."

Absolutely. Have at it, please. Here or privately, I would be happy to hear your suggestions, and more than willing to broaden my horizons.

By Bob_chong on Saturday, October 07, 2000 - 03:49 pm: Edit

Fellraven:

When you said, "Most American beer is akin to British mass-produced keg lager. Fizzy and undrinkable," a more accurate way to have said this would have been, "the most popular American beer is akin to..." or "the best-selling American beer is akin to..." etc. But at this point, the high-quality brews outnumber the mass-produced piss beers by a factor of at least 10:1. Yes, Budweiser and other laughable beers sell well, but Bud is only one beer among thousands.

The beer revolution took hold here about 15 years ago, and it's been a wonderful thing.

BC

By Timk on Saturday, October 07, 2000 - 02:43 pm: Edit

Ahh, thanks Fellraven, that explains it then Artemis : - ) lol

By Timk on Saturday, October 07, 2000 - 02:40 pm: Edit

Ahh, thanks Fellraven, that explains it then Artemis : - ) lol

By Fellraven on Saturday, October 07, 2000 - 12:48 pm: Edit

Timk

Most American beer is akin to British mass-produced keg lager. Fizzy and undrinkable. However, there is a growing and lively movement in micro-breweries and brew pubs, often producing much higher quality lagers or English style beers/ales and many of them are (reputedly) producing very decent products. Good enough for CAMRA to order them for this year's GBBF (though they didn't arrive, apparently).

By Timk on Saturday, October 07, 2000 - 12:32 pm: Edit

Artemis, im not from the US, im from the Uk, and as I have never got around to drinking USA beer - this may be the cause of the difference in opinion - have you tried proper English beer - is there much difference to American beer? i would imagine so from some of the bottled stuff i have tasted - anyone know ?

By Petermarc on Saturday, October 07, 2000 - 12:24 pm: Edit

artemis-
them's fightin' words...

would you be so kind as to go into detail why you
think "virtually all wine is nasty", or is that not a subject that should be discussed in this forum?
(not like it hasn't gone way off the subject
in the most recent past)
i may be able to give you some suggestions that
might change your mind....

By Absinthedrinker on Saturday, October 07, 2000 - 09:11 am: Edit

Artemis

[virtually] All wine nasty? Surely not

By Artemis on Saturday, October 07, 2000 - 06:35 am: Edit

"Artemis, i know you can "taste" beer without swalowing it, but if you were ever to go to a tasting session then you wouldnt spit the beer out like wine"

No I would not. Not unless it was nasty, like virtually all wine is.

"any beer tasters lurking? : - )"?

I'm not lurking, I'm right here in the open. I've been to beer tastings from coast to coast of the U.S., have visited brew pubs in almost every state of the union, and have tasted more beers than the average person will encounter in his lifetime. I stand by what I said. I swallow beer because I like to, but I don't have to, to taste it. Not trying to flame you, I just don't agree with you.

By Artemis on Saturday, October 07, 2000 - 06:29 am: Edit

Ted wrote:

"These observations point in the direction of something I've wanted to say, but I've been a bit
reluctant to do so. While the product reviews are indeed helpful, and while they were done in good faith, they do present some errors with respect to flavoring and coloring. I for one, would like to see this revised, and would be willing to assist in doing so."

No need to be reluctant, Ted. I have no problem with being told I'm wrong, and told WHY, and being pointed in the right direction. Being told I'm wrong and that's the end of it, is a whole different matter - there's been entirely too much of that here and I hope that's over with. If by "willing to assist" you mean teaching people to recognize ingredients with their tongues and noses, I'm all for it. Teach away. I've been told your ability in this area is remarkable. But if what you mean is editing the guide to correct the alleged errors, based upon your own experience, no thanks. Many of those reviews were published at a time you openly admitted you had never tasted the products in question; apparently you had no interest in them. I'm happy to hear you're interested now, but I sincerely hope you want to be a teacher and not a proof reader.

Additionally, I hope people are aware that many if not all those reviews first made their appearance as posts here in the forum. Kallisti chose and edited them for the Guide based upon her own criteria, and she did an excellent job. Humor and creativity obviously played some part in her decision. I would hate to see that guide reduced a set of "facts" ....

"Additionally, FWIW, the lemon oil flavor you'll taste in Lasala is neither hyssop or lemon balm."

Never had any doubt about that.

By Don_walsh on Saturday, October 07, 2000 - 04:45 am: Edit

I believe Kallisti plans to 'reform' the Buyers Guide in the near future.

By Timk on Saturday, October 07, 2000 - 12:27 am: Edit

Artemis, i know you can "taste" beer without swalowing it, but if you were ever to go to a tasting session then you wouldnt spit the beer out like wine because it needs to be swallowed to get the full taste ie, you can only taste the bitter components when you swallow them because they then move over the very back of your tongue - any beer tasters lurking? : - )

By Lordhobgoblin on Friday, October 06, 2000 - 11:59 pm: Edit

I read an interesting little article a few months ago, (Financial Times Weekend July 1/July 2 2000) that suggests that recent research has found that not only are we capable of detecting, sweet, sour, bitter and salt our taste receptors are capable of detecting 2 other substances. These are polyunsaturated Fats and Umani (more familar as Monosodium Glutamate). Although what relevence this might have to tasting absinthe I don't know. Also the actual amount of taste buds people have on there tongues varies from only 500 up to 10,000.

Hobgoblin

By Anatomist1 on Friday, October 06, 2000 - 08:23 pm: Edit

Even though, by refined standards, I wouldn't know a taste bud from a Bud Light, I have to agree with Ted all the way on this one. When I first encountered the site and went through the guide, my first impression had very little to do with the consensus of opinion here. For one thing, promotional messages written by the distillers/producers are mixed in with subjective reviews quite confusingly.

My initial perusal of the guide led me to believe that 'Absinthe King' was the most desireable brand! All along, I have cringed when neophytes ask questions about what to do, and someone replies: "Read the Buyer's Guide.".

K.

By Tabreaux on Friday, October 06, 2000 - 05:49 pm: Edit

These observations point in the direction of something I've wanted to say, but I've been a bit reluctant to do so. While the product reviews are indeed helpful, and while they were done in good faith, they do present some errors with respect to flavoring and coloring. I for one, would like to see this revised, and would be willing to assist in doing so.

Additionally, FWIW, the lemon oil flavor you'll taste in Lasala is neither hyssop or lemon balm.

By Petermarc on Friday, October 06, 2000 - 01:55 pm: Edit

let's all remember that we can taste
sweet, salt, sour, bitter....the rest is
all in the nose....

By Artemis on Friday, October 06, 2000 - 12:28 pm: Edit

Perruche, no need to apologize. Absintheur is all over the Buyer's Guide, and for good reason. He knows of what he speaks.

Okay, you guys made me get out my bottle of Mari Mayans and a bottle of Herb Pharm wormwood extract. I stand corrected. The Mari Mayans smells like anise. The wormwood extract smells floral, nothing like the Mari Mayans. So what the hell is up with that review (which is almost a year old, as I remember)? Beats the hell out of me. Obviously more experimentation is called for. Now I'm forced to drink some MM. Guess I'll have to make the best of it. I might even build up some courage and taste the extract. By the way, Perruche, do you care to go into detail about your concoction, publish a full review maybe?

By Perruche_verte on Friday, October 06, 2000 - 11:31 am: Edit

Artemis, I apologize. It was your review that I was paraphrasing, not Absintheur's.

A friend had a bottle of Herb Pharm wormwood extract, and I took a whiff of it -- much the same aroma that our steeped homebrew produced before we added the other herbs. I tried MM again and really couldn't detect it in the nose.

As Ted writes, that doesn't mean it isn't there. But it's low enough in the mix that apparently the producer isn't concerned that we be able to smell and taste it. I do have a slight problem with that, although the results are still very pleasant.

By Artemis on Friday, October 06, 2000 - 10:02 am: Edit

Lemon Balm (Melissa) and Hyssop are two entirely different plants that neither look nor taste anything like one another. I have no idea why Melissa is called Lemon Balm, because it doesn't taste much like lemon to me; on the contrary, more like mint. Hyssop is never called Lemon Balm, at least not by anybody who knows the difference, but I don't think that's what Wormwood was saying (I hope not!).

I want to stress that the unpleasant element I perceive in Lasala has nothing to do with hyssop, melissa or lemon per se. It's a chemical, non-natural flavor that I associate with the oiliness mentioned by Ted. I'm willing to concede that what I smell in Mari Mayans is not wormwood, but it sure smells a lot like wormwood extract. And I am referring strictly to the SMELL of wormwood, not the flavor. Of course, smell is inextricably tied to flavor, but the "wormwood" aspect of which I'm speaking is apparent in MM 140 even if you never put it into your mouth. If that's not really wormwood, then shame on MM and the joke's on me.

I also agree with Ted that the herbal finish in Deva is anything but faint - it's pretty stout.

I feel sorry for anyone who can't taste beer without swallowing it. I usually know exactly what a beer is going to taste like when I smell it, and I'm seldom wrong. I most definitely know for sure as soon as it hits my tongue.

By Fellraven on Friday, October 06, 2000 - 07:49 am: Edit

Lemon balm is the common name for melissa (officianalis) not hyssop AFAIK.

Having grown both in the garden for some years, my experience is that the leaves of melissa, when bruised, do have a very strong lemony scent, while those of hyssop are herbal and licorice-y. I've also used both in salads etc and don't recall anything of lemon about the hyssop.

By Wormwood on Friday, October 06, 2000 - 04:10 am: Edit

Another name for that herb is "Lemon Balm" wonder why it got that name, Hummmmmm.....

By Timk on Friday, October 06, 2000 - 01:01 am: Edit

Well Tabreaux, it just goes to show taste is entirely subjective, though i have yet to find someone who genuinely likes the taste of hills yet : - ) lol

By Don_walsh on Thursday, October 05, 2000 - 11:41 pm: Edit

Just in case anyone misunderstood: nitrobenzene is a constituent of many lemony furniture polishes and is NOT an ingredient of anything for human consumption. It is toxic to liver and kidneys...

By Tabreaux on Thursday, October 05, 2000 - 03:22 pm: Edit

I've observed the aftertaste in Lasala which you are attributing to be from hyssop. I think at least part of it is actually the lemon oil finish, and the rest is something which seems peculiar, as it also has an oily sort of texture.

M. Mayans tastes like star anise to me and not much else. I know the finishing aftertaste being described here, and that seems to be more tyipcal of star anise than absinthium.

To add to Tim K's comments, I find the herbal finish in Deva to be much more pronounced then 'very faint'. In fact, it is so strong that I find it to be semi vegetable-like, yet not unpleasant.

FWIW, I don't taste absinthium in any of these products either. Now, that doesn't mean that they don't contain it, I just don't taste it, which is a likely indicator that it is present in smaller concentrations that I might initially expect.

By Timk on Thursday, October 05, 2000 - 02:44 pm: Edit

I, myself have tried several absinthes, but my experience of Deva is a strong Anise flavour with a very fait herbal undertone, it is more rounded on the tongue and somewhat fuller in flavour than Mari which is lighter in flavour and has a mildly bitter element which cuts through a somewhat watery taste further foreward on the tongue. A 50/50 mix of the two gives two distinct flavours, one sharp cutting towards the front of the tongue and another more rounded taste overlaying it. You may think this is odd because the "bitter" taste receptors are at the base of the tongue hence you have to swallow beer to taste it, but i can only go by what i taste - well thats my pennys worth : - )

By Artemis on Thursday, October 05, 2000 - 02:05 pm: Edit

Sundry comments addressed. Have at you, mates.

Marc said:

"What is the Lemon Pledge?"

The first thing that came to mind when, with a mouthful of Lasala, I squinched up my face and reached for my pen, with an eye toward creating the review that is now on the Buyers Guide. Something other than lemon as Mother Nature intended it to be. Nastilemon. Chemicalemon. Lemon's evil twin in an opposing dark dimension.

Don said:

" ... Achieved with nitrobenzene ..."

There you go. I don't know what nitrobenzene is, but that's wot ah'm talkin bout, all the same. Lemon Pledge.

Petermarc said:

"hyssop...i'll try to keep some around."

Well, I didn't do anything that extreme. Only this summer, I plucked a leaf off a mature hyssop plant in my garden and chewed on it. Delightful. And I recognized Lasala. But without the furniture polish.

Our green feathered friend said:

"While Absintheur claims (in the Buyers Guide) to detect the presence of wormwood, I canít distinguish it from anything else in the vague and very subtle herbal aftertaste,"

I believe I said something similar. It's not in the aftertaste, it's right in your face. If you've ever put your nose to a bottle of wormwood extract, you'll never mistake it again.

By Lordhobgoblin on Thursday, October 05, 2000 - 08:19 am: Edit

The answer must be genetic then.

Hobgoblin

By Absinthedrinker on Thursday, October 05, 2000 - 07:02 am: Edit

I only drink it in Sheelan's in Tottenham Street, they take it very seriously there.

By Lordhobgoblin on Thursday, October 05, 2000 - 06:45 am: Edit

Absinthedrinker,

This quality must be in my genetic makeup :-)

Either that or you're buying your Guinness in the wrong pubs.

Hobgoblin

By Absinthedrinker on Thursday, October 05, 2000 - 06:41 am: Edit

Lord Hobgoblin

I wish I could drink Guinness without getting a hangover!

By Lordhobgoblin on Thursday, October 05, 2000 - 06:34 am: Edit

Perruche verte,

If you want a drink that gives no hangover try Guinness, gives me no hangover no matter how plastered I get. Also English Mead, no hangover either.

Hobgoblin

By Perruche_verte on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 07:59 pm: Edit

I've had durian both canned and in Thai coconut-milk ice cream (delicious!), but never fresh.

The local Asian markets sell them. They are fairly expensive ($7-9) but large and heavy. One day soon I'll take the plunge.

For more on this excellent and amusing fruit:

http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~durian/

(Durian Online!)

By Perruche_verte on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 07:53 pm: Edit

Iím delighted to read of more tasting experiences.

Recently I have tried both Deva and Mari Mayans as aperitif, as digestif, with water and sugar, with water and no sugar, and as a sort of finale, side-by-side with a glass of Arak Razzouk. Arak, to the best of my knowledge, is made with wine spirits and aniseed, without other herbs. I was trying to use it as a sort of baseline to detect other herbal flavors in the absinthe. This combination of drinks nearly resulted in making me late to work the next morning; Iím afraid the notion that absinthe (or any orther alcohol) gives no hangover is pure myth.

I didnít try blending the absinthes together, or mizing them with soda pop. I will save such adulterations for my steeped homebrew, which I must report is neither bad enough to pour down the drain, nor good enough to bother making again.

The comparative test was only partly successful. I can tell there is something else in Mari Mayans, but I simply canít determine what it is. It doesnít really help that Iím not really able to distinguish between star anise and aniseed at this point, but Iíve been advised that Mari Mayans is full of star anise and the flavor is similar to, but nonetheless different from, the anise flavor in arak. While Absintheur claims (in the Buyers Guide) to detect the presence of wormwood, I canít distinguish it from anything else in the vague and very subtle herbal aftertaste, which seems somewhat obscured by the 70% alcohol content. The stuff is quite drinkable and pleasant, and certainly attractively packaged, but I donít think Iíll order it again.

Deva is more complex and more enjoyable. There are hints of fennel and wormwood, and other things too (I think I taste the peppery bite of coriander, and perhaps angelica), though again the anise flavor does dominate and make the individual flavors hard to distinguish. Dominant anise is no threat to me, anise can tie me up and beat me anytime she likes, but in the case of Deva, there is a rich, dark spirit beneath the surface, not in clear focus, but still floating there in the aftertaste, earthy but teasing, unbearable.

After my first glass ever, I found myself meditating on the images in Robert Motherwellís ďElegy to the Spanish RepublicĒ series, the large sad shapes in a blue and red sunset.

(I have limited sympathy for the Republic itself, which inspired these words:

ďA government which sends boys of fifteen to the front with rifles forty years old and keeps its biggest men and newest weapons in the rear is manifestly more afraid of the revolution than the fascists.Ē --George Orwell

"The Liberal Government of Spain could have rendered the Fascist elements powerless long ago. Instead it compromised and dallied. Even now at this moment, there are men in this Government who want to go easy on the rebelsÖ You can never tell, you know, the present Government might yet need these rebellious forces to crush the workers' movement." -- Buenaventura Durruti (September 1937)

But Fascism, which won the day, is no better by comparison.)

The lunch I ate afterward (black beans and rice) tasted so good it brought me to tears.

Probably I should try Lasala and Segarra next, if the posts in this thread are any indication.

By Tabreaux on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 06:28 pm: Edit

It's yummy. I'd eat it now if I had it.

By Don_walsh on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 01:12 pm: Edit

I don't eat durian. It has a reputation for not mixing with alcohol.

Ted likes it. My wife loves it. All my Thai friends love it. It is the most expensive fruit in Thailand, and the only fruit that tigers will eat.

It is very rich. So I am told.

Yes it does smell pretty rank.

By Jkk on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 10:31 am: Edit

I bought Montana about fifteen years ago in
Barcelona when it was the only absinthe I could
find. Nice old-fashioned labelling, but that's
about it. It tastes mostly like anise, and I have
never had any effect from it beyond that of
alcohol. Still have those bottles around
somewhere at my parents and I'm not close to
finishing them off yet. In other words, I found
the taste very uninspiring, far below MM, Deva and
Serpis. I also think Pernod is very underrated as
far as taste alone goes.

By Anatomist1 on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 09:25 am: Edit

Don,

I had a biology prof. who introduced us to Durian fruit. We only got to smell a sample though. He said I could get a frozen one at the local asian market, but that the freezing really tames the pungence. He described it as smelling like a "wet cat's rump". Do you eat them often?

K.

By Midas on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 09:21 am: Edit

It's good to hear some positive feedback about LaSala. I just ordered my first bottle, and I've been wondering if I've misspent my money. I've also ordered a bottle of Serpis, yet that is purely for the novelty of having a bottle of red liquid that says absenta on the label.
-Robert.

By Petermarc on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 09:02 am: Edit

;-)

By Tabreaux on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 08:22 am: Edit

I find that Hill's doesn't taste much of anything, much less anything familiar or traditional. It is very weak, and tastes more like funky vodka than anything absinthe. If it didn't say "Absinth" on the bottle, I seriously doubt that anyone would buy it. I know I wouldn't!

By Petermarc on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 08:18 am: Edit

i guess this "taste" thing is really
personal. no accounting for anybody's...
maybe hills is really good yet no one here
really knows or can taste it...

By Tabreaux on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 08:17 am: Edit

The 'lemon Pledge' flavor in La Sala almost certainly comes from lemon oil (a common item of commerce), which is probably added at the same time as the coloring.

I find Montana to have a rather greasy vegetable texture (think freshly cut grass).

By Chrysippvs on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 07:42 am: Edit

Motana always struck me as flat and monochromatic...just not very much going on in the mouth. Lasala is a good spanish absinthe excepting the lemon taste, which is around 60% what I taste.

I have heard terrible things about Tunel absinthe, I have a friend who lives in Barcelona and he searched it out for me. He described it as "artifical colour, artifical flavor, no louche, a ghastly mixture of Hills and Mari Mayans." Hence I am going to stay away from that one....

I still say that Segarra is the best of the Spanish, I just wish they didn't color it yellow...

By Don_walsh on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 07:38 am: Edit

Polish? Achieved with nitrobenzene, if I'm not mistaken.

By Fellraven on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 07:29 am: Edit

But Lemon Pledge has a certain .... polish, doncha think?

By Black_rabbit on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 06:19 am: Edit

I find Montana to be a little... flat. Almost two dimensional tasting. The flavor isn't as intense compared with any other brand I've had. It's like it's hardly even there compared to Lasalla or Deva. I am hoping it grows on me.

Lasalla rocks. I like to appreciate each brand for it's particular flavors... I like Sebor too. Though the last bottle I got (I swear) tastes of celery leaves. It's wierd, but it has it's charm.

The Lemon Pledge is only legal in Hawaii, and even then the lemon must be ripe and you both have to go through counselling first.

By Don_walsh on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 06:12 am: Edit

I wonder what Marc would make of a durian?

Ted recently had a chance to try this fruit out in more conventional way.

Rumors that we are working on a durian liqueur are however, completely unfounded.

:)

By Petermarc on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 05:13 am: Edit

hyssop...i'll try to keep some around...as far
as lemon pledge is concerned, maybe, but don't
huff too much as it dulls the palate...

By Lordhobgoblin on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 04:09 am: Edit

As far as I'm aware "Lemon Pledge" involves an unusual (and probably illegal) act between a man and a consenting lemon :-o

Not a suitable topic of conversation for this forum.

Hobgoblin

By Marc on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 02:16 am: Edit

artemis

what is the Lemon Pledge? Is it like The Pledge Of Allegiance or The Boy Scout Pledge? Is it part
of some kind of fruit cult ritual? Are you a member? What are the requirements for membership?
To join, does it help to have a passion for citrus fruit? I like oranges. Will that give me an in?

By Artemis on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 01:53 am: Edit

I've trained myself to drink La Sala because an unfortunate accident of shipping provided me with many free bottles, but it still tastes like Lemon Pledge to me. The point about fresh herbs is well taken, but if anyone tries the recommended experiment using hyssop, he'll see that fennel by no means dominates the flavor of La Sala. It's more complex than is immediately apparent.

By Petermarc on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 12:24 am: Edit

actually the most dominate flavor in lasala
is fennel.(try breaking a fresh stalk and smelling
it while smelling the drink, if you want to train your nose and palate, it is good to have herbs, fruit,flower, etc. scents around and comparing
them with the liquor, wine, etc.)
i find it quite enjoyable with a full sugar morcel and perrier in a large cordon glass 3/4 full...the carbonation seem to intensify the flavor on the palate along with making it very refreshing...

By Bob_chong on Wednesday, October 04, 2000 - 12:03 am: Edit

I agree--I like LaSala. It seems to have more character than Deva. Then again, I am new to this whole thing and still working on my absinthe palate (e.g., it's hard for me to say, "Yes, this tastes like wormwood," when all I can taste is anise). Perhaps I will learn to recognize the subtleties--a perfect rationalization to drink more.

BC

By Marc on Tuesday, October 03, 2000 - 11:57 pm: Edit

citrus.

By Marc on Tuesday, October 03, 2000 - 11:57 pm: Edit

yes. I like it as well. Philip LaSala is also a nice, light-on-the-anise absinthe with a touch of cirus.

By Bob_chong on Tuesday, October 03, 2000 - 11:45 pm: Edit

I tried Montana the other day, and found it quite enjoyable. Sure, it doesn't louche quite as opaquely as the other Spanish brands, but I liked the less-overpowering anise flavor when compared to Deva. Anyone else try this stuff?

BC

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