The future of this forum

Sepulchritude Forum: The Absinthe Forum Thru December 2001: The future of this forum
By Pataphysician on Wednesday, August 15, 2001 - 07:25 am: Edit

Dada Siegt!

By Pataphysician on Wednesday, August 15, 2001 - 07:24 am: Edit

Ubu Roi!!

By Alphasoixante on Tuesday, August 14, 2001 - 03:05 pm: Edit

"Where'd you see the flyer? "

Ubu Web, visual, concrete, and sound poetry:

www.ubu.com

see the "sound + insane" section.

By Tavarua on Tuesday, August 14, 2001 - 01:33 pm: Edit

She holds vital clues to this gang of dog head snatchers.


doghead.jpg

By Perruche_Verte on Tuesday, August 14, 2001 - 11:35 am: Edit

Oh my god, that is sad. Even though Ling-Ling looks like one of those unbearably annoying little dogs that were probably bred to be served as appetizers...

Where'd you see the flyer?

By Alphasoixante on Tuesday, August 14, 2001 - 05:25 am: Edit

lingling

By Lordhobgoblin on Monday, August 13, 2001 - 11:25 am: Edit

Alphasoixante,

" "You mean you only spell correctly when you are drunk. What type of English were you taught at school in Germany? I believe it was probably
English-English (it ought to have been) rather than Americanised-English." Ah yes. The true, pure, and original language: die Ursprache. A common nationalist nostalgic fantasy. Still a tad bitter about the end of the empire are we?"

You have indeed missed my point totally. I am not a British nationalist (however living in England for the past 13 years I am grateful to the English for their hospitality towards me and I like them very much, otherwise why would I be here?). I am actually Irish and grew up in the 'remnants of the British Empire'.

I said nothing about a pure language. Modern English-English is a mixture of Anglo-Saxon, Norse, French (old and new), Gaelic, Latin and God knows whatever else. Nor did I knock your Americanised-English. I was merely pointing out the FACT that if you learn English in School in Europe you WILL be taught English-English (and not Americanised-English). Just as someone learning English in Mexico will learn Americanised-English.

I am not at all 'bitter about the end of the empire' as you put it, I welcome the fact that the former colonies of the old British Empire (including the USA) are determining their own futures. Although your revelling in it displays your prejudices clearly. I think perhaps you have a chip on your shoulder, do I detect an inferiority complex hidden under the surface of your persona?

Hobgoblin

By Heiko on Saturday, August 11, 2001 - 06:26 am: Edit

...oh, and even better, the 2001 model...grrrrrrrrrr!!! :-)

2001

By Heiko on Saturday, August 11, 2001 - 06:01 am: Edit

I didn't say I don't like BMW because 40 year old family men like them - I wanted to express that a BMW is probably very good for comfortable cruising, very reliable and so on - not bad, but I'd like something a little more suicidal than that.

"A Triumph, on the other hand, offers you nothing but some pot-bellied, duck-tailed, fifty-year-old notion of style"

I think you're talking of their classic street cruiser bikes (and you're right). I was talking of the Daytona:

Daytona 955i

By Head_Prosthesis on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 10:08 pm: Edit

Awww. You big lug.

By Anatomist1 on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 09:30 pm: Edit

Heiko,

I don't care whether they're the rage with Nazi skinheads or Britney Spears fans, I tend to judge things on their inherent merits, not by who tends to like them. BMW motorcyles are beautiful marvels of sensible engineering -- especially the opposed twin cylinder models. They're design philosophy is actually more admirable than with their cars: gradual improvements on a good idea. If you've ever dealt with japanese bikes, you know they scrap the whole design and start over every year. Anyone who would stick with such a geeky design for 50+ years because it is vastly functionally superior gets my vote in a second. They're smooth, comfortable, powerful, and they routinely last 500,000 miles. I owned one, and I was constantly amazed at how easily accessible adjustments were, and how handles and knobs seemed to magically appear right when you needed them. A Triumph, on the other hand, offers you nothing but some pot-bellied, duck-tailed, fifty-year-old notion of style. The engineering is clumsy, inefficient, and famously unreliable, the quality contol and construction are obviously the product of massive alcohol consumption and general malaise in a has-been empire, and they're uncomfortable as hell.


Head,

I can't say that I 'love' you back, although I'm reasonably sure I would prevent my dog from biting you if you came on my property.

K.

By Alphasoixante on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 05:36 pm: Edit

"You mean you only spell correctly when you are drunk. What type of English were you taught at school in Germany? I believe it was probably
English-English (it ought to have been) rather than Americanised-English."

Ah yes. The true, pure, and original language: die Ursprache. A common nationalist nostalgic fantasy. Still a tad bitter about the end of the empire, are we?

I'm not a linguist, but judging from the Queen's own spelling (cheque, colour, centre, etc.), she seems to have filched from the French.

Why do the French let the Brits mangle their language like that?

Benny Hill uber Alles.

By Heiko on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 04:53 pm: Edit

Unlike BMW cars (which are really nice cars) BMW motorcycles are something very special - you can love them or hate them. I tend to hate them. Forty year old men with family tend to love them...
I would also like some Japanese "rice-cooker" (hehe...), only the Daytona design is a little better than those CBR's and FZR's. One thing those bikes have in common: bye bye Porsche, bye bye Ferrari ;-)

btw. Stuttgart, the town I lived in for 23 years (until I moved here, only 50km away) is the home of Daimler (Mercedes) AND Porsche. Maybe your colleague was from Stuttgart, too, Head? It's the sister-city of St. Louis, MO - that's why our exchange went there.

Kevin, I mailorder absinthe from Spain once in a while - but that's it...

By Head_Prosthesis on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 03:30 pm: Edit

HAHAHAHHAHAHAHA!!!

I love you Anatomist.

By Anatomist1 on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 03:25 pm: Edit

Heiko,

You live near a BMW factory and dream of owning a Triumph? Do you mail-order cases of Schlitz and Wonder bread from the US as well?

K.

By Head_Prosthesis on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 02:25 pm: Edit

I worked with a fine young german from the home of mercedes. He learned his english in St. Louis, MO. He had the best accent. It was german with mid-west inflection as spoken by Sammy Davis Jr. and a hint of Elmer Fudd.

I asked him to teach me some german and he said:

"You mazza fuckeen' Amewicahns! Fo' sheven fuckeen' yees you made me shpeak zis lankvige. Unt now you all vant me ta shpeak zhurman again!
Go fuck you'sef, Meng!"

He didn't like that I was laughing myself to tears the entire time either.

By Heiko on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 01:59 pm: Edit

The fact that my pronunciation (and also my writing, at least sometimes) is Americanized is more due to the fact that I learned more English from movies, music and commercials than from school. Not to forget student exchange and meeting again with people from this exchange program rather often in the following years.
All that made me feel at home the most in one special 'dialect': the English of white middle class from St. Louis, MO.

By Tavarua on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 01:41 pm: Edit

I have always wanted to own a Ducatti. But then Bukkaki was born and well, that's just plain sick. Know what the hell can I tell people I want. Oh well, guess I will stick with old back-up, the Fatboy.

By Lordhobgoblin on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 01:33 pm: Edit

Heiko,

"We were taught the Frenchised and Norwegianised Anglo-Saxon."

Well that isn't going to be much fucking good to you unless you're a time traveller and there was me thinking the German education system was quite good.

"...my dreambike would be a nice Triumph Daytona 955i..."

An appreciation of quality British engineering, it seems there is hope for you yet.

Hobgoblin

By Lordhobgoblin on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 01:26 pm: Edit

Ab-Fab was brilliant.

One type of humour I don't get though is that Japanese stuff. The sort of show where they beat someone on the ass with a table-tennis bat with nails in it, then he jumps into a pool of freezing cold water, then they tip a bucket of maggots on top of him. A nation who finds this sort of stuff absolutely hilarious has got to be one strange nation of people.

Hobgoblin

By Heiko on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 01:19 pm: Edit

"What type of English were you taught at school in Germany?"

We were taught the Frenchised and Norwegianised Anglo-Saxon.

The only kind of protest we had in school was to write words the Americanized way - the teachers didn't like it but had to accept it...

Wrangler jeans? What is that? I think I heard grandpa talk about Wrangler some time ago, but I'm not sure anymore...
McDonalds - well, we have almost no other fast food restaurants in Germany than McDonalds, otherwise I'd like Taco Bell better.
Marlboro? When I was still smoking this used to be my third choice. No. 1 was Gitanes Blondes, No.2 was L&M.
Cowboy boots? For posers only... (in Germany, really - only the cheapest posers wear cowboy boots). Harley? No, I don't like choppers, my dreambike would be a nice Triumph Daytona 955i, but right now I have to stay with a classic Vespa (no moneta for Daytona...). Coca Cola? No, Pepsi (there's more caffeine in Pepsi).
Disney? Oh yeah, that's really sad, I know...

"Dream of Californication..." (Anthony Kiedis)
"That's the most stupidest song I've ever heard" (Dave Lombardo, Fantomas/Ex-Slayer)

By Chevalier on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 01:18 pm: Edit

Many Chileans are the same. No surprise there, though. General Pinochet spent 17 years knocking the punch out of them.

By Admin on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 01:13 pm: Edit

Oh, and I wouldn't assume it was a cultural thing, except he kept stating it was.

By Admin on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 12:27 pm: Edit

Ok, does anyone else find this thread as funny and endlessly fascinating as I? It is almost archetypal.

And Heiko, as an American, I frequently write english-english, as a sort of pretention (or protest, I like to think): colour, humour, theatre. But I also make up or misuse words. Like "caesarian seduction" (bat liked that one) & "hymenally"

I lived with a french canadian for awhile. Impressed with my vocabulary (he had no high opinion of Americans to begin with) he commented that I speak english like the French speak French. But I think that was because Sepulchritude was in the middle of its les Liaisons Dangereuse style letter writing project.

He (the French Canadian roommate) didn't get british humour AT ALL.

US: Watching Ab-Fab, me screaming on floor with legs in the air at something Bubbles sez.
HIM: I do not understand? This is not funny. She is just stupid. It is not funny at all. Horrible. Why are you laughing? It is so stupid.

And he was like this with EVERYTHING. So, what is that about?

By Tavarua on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 11:50 am: Edit

There is nothing wrong with finding another culture interesting. I often find myself admiring the Aussies and Italian culture. Everything I know is second hand, but on paper it looks good. I suppose if we focused on the negatives, no one would ever dream.

By Head_Prosthesis on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 11:48 am: Edit

"It's not an easy word to define. Not even language scholars agree on whether a certain situation is "ironic" or not. For instance, if Alanis and Moose (Alanis's childhood costar cum nemesis) both moved independently to LA from Ontario and later became lovers, some would argue that this situation by itself constitutes irony. On the other hand, if Alanis and Moose each moved because they individually were convinced that Ontario was devoid of potential mates, and then met each other at a bar in LA, that would be ironic."

from - http://www.sturges.org/matt/essays/ironic.htm

By Artemis on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 11:45 am: Edit

"1967 Chevrolet. Overdriven but functioning."

"The Nephilim" drives such a car. A Chevelle, actually. Roughly 500 horsepower. True story:

He and I (me the passenger) drove that car to the waterfront to enjoy the nighttime skyline of the "Big Apple". As we returned to the car, a boy in the shadows, a young girl hanging all over him, the girl all hot and bothered (you could almost smell the musk), said: "Want to trade?"

She had the dumbass look of an Irish Setter on her face. She thought he was talking about his car for the Chevelle. She didn't see that behind her back, he was pointing to her.

The offer was declined.

"Runs on milky green gasoline."

Not literally, but if you run "essence", a phrase often seen in old French texts about absinthe, through a machine translator, you get "gasoline". Somehow it all adds up.

By Chevalier on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 11:28 am: Edit

Errata: IN ABSINTHIA VERITAS?

By Chevalier on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 11:26 am: Edit

Ah, but Heiko WAS drunk when he said it.
Or IN VINO VERITAS?

By Lordhobgoblin on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 11:20 am: Edit

Heiko,

"I write words British when I'm drunk...usually I want to be cool and edit out the 'u', but now I'm too lazy..."

You mean you only spell correctly when you are drunk. What type of English were you taught at school in Germany? I believe it was probably English-English (it ought to have been) rather than Americanised-English.

You consider Americanisation to be "cool". This is very very sad indeed. You no doubt also hold Wrangler jeans, McDonalds, Marlborough cigarettes, Budweiser, Cowboy Boots, Harley Davidson motorbikes, Coca-Cola and Walt Disney in high regard. How sad.

Hobgoblin

By Lordhobgoblin on Friday, August 10, 2001 - 11:11 am: Edit

Tavarua,

Unfortunately Alanis Morrisette wouldn't know irony if it bit her on the ass.

"Like rain on a sunny day"

That's not ironic that's just normal British weather.

"A free ride when you've already paid"

That's not ironic that's just fucking unfortunate.

Someone should have bought Alanis a dictionary so that she could look up the definition of Ironic before she demonstrated her ignorance in public.

Hobgoblin

By Verawench on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 08:39 pm: Edit

It IS Mari Mayans!

By Head_Prosthesis on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 06:51 pm: Edit

Don't let the dog drink it.

By _Blackjack on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 06:43 pm: Edit

There's something the color of Mari Mayans coming out of the heater core on my '72 Eldorado...

By Mordantiabat on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 06:29 pm: Edit

"Every joke is a tiny revolution."

- George Orwell

By Head_Prosthesis on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 06:15 pm: Edit

VVVROOOOOOOOOOOOMMMMMMMM!!!!!

By Chevalier on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 06:12 pm: Edit

1967 Chevrolet. Overdriven but functioning. Runs on milky green gasoline.

By Head_Prosthesis on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 06:03 pm: Edit

I'll tell you when this thread is closed Chevrolet.

By Heiko on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 05:49 pm: Edit

sck m dck

By Chevalier on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 05:44 pm: Edit

May I have your attention please: We regret to inform you that this thread is now closed. Please exit the side doors, and don't forget to take your "u"s with you -- edited or otherwise. The management is not responsible for any lost or stolen emoticons. Thank you for your cooperation.

By Heiko on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 05:35 pm: Edit

"... And THAT, ladies and gentleman, is the future of this forum. Thank you and good night."

Hahahaha.
I think I got it.
Right? Right? Am I right? Supposed to be a big laugh in South Italy, Northern Wales and West India?

By Chevalier on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 05:27 pm: Edit

The curtain is closing ...

By Heiko on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 05:25 pm: Edit

Will I ever write "humor" or "neighbor" again on this forum without feeling silly? I don't know... Now that I've revealed the truth, I think I'm going to avoid any words like that from now on...

Just a bit of real-life psychology from your psychosis-loaden Heiko ;-)

Damn, never mix Segarra and NS...

By Chevalier on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 05:22 pm: Edit

... And THAT, ladies and gentleman, is the future of this forum. Thank you and good night.

By Heiko on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 05:19 pm: Edit

btw. I never found anything about myself that was serious. I've never done anything serious(ly).

Well, irony is humour without laughter from tape. Most jokes on TV are laughter from tape without humour. Just found out I write words British when I'm drunk...usually I want to be cool and edit out the 'u', but now I'm too lazy...

By Heiko on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 05:12 pm: Edit

Now that the edit function works, I love to receive all posts per email (unedited...) :-) ;-) :-))) ;-)))))
|-)))))))

By _Blackjack on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 03:55 pm: Edit

[Deleted because I decided it wasn't as funny as I thought it was.]

By Wolfgang on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 02:07 pm: Edit

---Laughing at oneself is one of the greatest pleasures in life. ---

Whaha! I`m running around, pissing on the carpet like a pathetic poodle at the taught of tasting a sample of Jade`s absinthe this weekend, does it make me ridiculous ? YES and I love it!

Quand à savoir si ça a un lien avec mes origines de Canadien-français, ça c'est une autre histoire !

By Heiko on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 02:05 pm: Edit

Would we all love Head Prosthesis (oh yes, we all love you!) if this board was full of overly-serious idiots?

But you're right, Germans can't laugh about themselves (unless they are lazy potheads - and guess what most of my friends are...).

btw. what I wanted to say in the first place was not about emoticons (I only used one by incident). I wanted to say that not Wolfgang's and not my answer to Chevalier's post was meant seriously. If you expect your statements not to be taken seriously all the time, then you can't take all the answers seriously.

I don't know, but we are mostly talking nonsense blabla on this forum, only sometimes you seem to become serious about it all (like "this forum lacks all sense of irony, only damn idiots. Except for myself of course.")
Maybe it's my German genes that miss the irony in this...sorry.

By Tavarua on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 01:47 pm: Edit

I've always found French Canadians to understand irony very well.

Thanks to that damn Alanis Morisette.

By Lordhobgoblin on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 01:05 pm: Edit

Heiko,

The differences are very subtle and it is down to the individual to use his judgement. You could say a statement has to be interpreted in light of the backgound against which it is made, but it is more of a feel for things.

If you can spot the ridiculous side of everything we all do then you can have empathy with the irony and spot the irony, if not you won't see irony.

On this forum we are a bunch of over-earnest, over-serious, pompous tight-asses when it comes down to absinthe (Jade or otherwise), it's only a fucking bottle of green booze, it's not the meaning of life, it's not even important (except to those whose livelihood's are tied up in it in which case it is quite rightly important to them). If you can't see that this situation is ridiculously funny then it means that you will never see the irony in it. It's sad to take life so seriously that even trivialities like this aren't seen for what they really are.

Irony is intelligent humour, it's not given to you on a plate, or with a big sign saying "this is a joke now please laugh". If a person can't see the ridiculous nature of himself and his actions then he won't get irony, and let's face when you look at it the behaviour of modern human beings is completely ridiculous. We are not that important, what we do is not that important, we are all ridiculous. Laughing at oneself is one of the greatest pleasures in life.

Without wanting to cause offence to any nationality certain cultures in my opinion are just not able to get irony at all (e.g. Germany, Scandanavia and Japan), maybe you all take yourselves too seriously. Others get it very easy (e.g. Ireland, UK, France, South Africa, Greece and Pakistan). The USA is a very mixed bag, most people don't get irony but quite a few get it very well. Incidently I've always found French Canadians to understand irony very well.

None of us choose where to be born. Maybe in the next life you'll be lucky.

Hobgoblin

By Wolfgang on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 10:19 am: Edit

Both of you are so funny ;-) This conversation could be the perfect stereotype of a British gentleman talking with a German. (And yes I do use the ;-) ).

By Heiko on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 10:14 am: Edit

I can't tell what it is, but there must be some difference in how someone says serious and non-serious things to make the decision "irony or not".
Otherwise noone in the world, not even the British would be able to recognize irony as such.

In Germany, I'm often stunned people don't even realize something was meant ironic even if you start to smile at them. The reaction here is more kind of: "first he says something like that and then he even considers it to be funny, what an asshole" ...

By Lordhobgoblin on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 09:27 am: Edit

Heiko,

Irony is best done completely deadpan and without showing emotion and giving no sign of lack of seriousness. Someone delivering ironic humour does not wink or smile so as to give the game away. This is missing the point, it's not slap-stick and there's no canned laughter to help you to know when to laugh. As such cyberspace is a great environment for irony.

I once knew a French director of a large Italian corporation. He had an great ironic sense of humour, in the UK office we thought he was very funny indeed. However in the North of Italy (in the South they laughed but then Italy is 2 distinct countries culturally) they all just thought he was a rude and arrogant man, they just couldn't see the joke because he delivered humour in a non-emotional, deadly serious manner.

Hobgoblin

By Heiko on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 08:53 am: Edit

Well, written language usually appears to be a lot more serious than spoken words. It lacks any emotional information (no mimic or other means of showing that you are not serious).
How could I know something is meant ironically if I don't really know a person, don't see him or her and just read a statement that could as well be dead serious?

In spoken language there are certain changes in the tone of what is said or in a special mimic on someone's face that can tell you "hey, he's not serious now". In addition to that it's always easier to recognize irony and sarcasm when you know people.

A good example: recently, I thought this one guy's posts (shizow, I think was his nick) must be ironic. What he said was just so deadly stupid, but in the end it seemed he really meant what he wrote and was totally pissed of by our answers...

By Verawench on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 08:35 am: Edit

Above all, emoticons are the insult to ASCII artists everywhere.

By Head_Prosthesis on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 07:25 am: Edit

Emoticons are symbolic of the continuing degradation of serious content in our languages. While they are aesthetically interesting, they also become the catch phrase of the day and too often are used to excuse or soften any challenging or critical comments.

example "I could distill circles around anyones ass in this Forum ;)"

This message without any emoticonic accents would generally spur a comment like "Prove it you little turd!" However the emoticon tells the reader:

A. I am not to be taken seriously
B. There is most likely nothing true
in this statement
C. Please don't hurt me!

}:o)-----*

By Lordhobgoblin on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 06:54 am: Edit

Heiko,

" "Sometimes there is a distinct lack of appreciation of irony and sarcasm on this forum." Also applies to answers ;-)"

Very likely.

But the use of a smiley face symbol is not compatible with sarcastic or ironic humour. Irony and sarcastic humour relies on the recipient having to decide whether the comment was made seriously or not (if you decide correctly you have got the joke). Without this the joke doesn't work. A smiley face takes this away and kills the joke.

Hobgoblin

By Don_Walsh on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 05:28 am: Edit

As edited by Maurice Chevalier

" 'sank Heaven, for leetle girls..."

By Chevalier on Wednesday, August 08, 2001 - 05:52 pm: Edit

Quoted from:

"THE COLLECTED ABSINTHE ESSAYS OF WALSH WITMAN"

By Don_Walsh on Wednesday, August 08, 2001 - 07:06 am: Edit

Absinthe:

Primary effect: ethanol intoxication and aesthetic stimulation.

Secondary effects: stimulates appetite. Stimulates digestion.

Contraindications: don't let your host drink this if you are an intestinal parasite or a malarial parasite

Tertiary effects: causes verbal sparring on web forums

By Don_Walsh on Wednesday, August 08, 2001 - 07:01 am: Edit

I think absinthe qualifies as 'flavored bitters'.

BTW, Merck classifies 'oil of wormwood' as an antimalarial. That is interesting since an Artemisia species is being very jealously guarded and much studied as an anti-falciparum malaria drug in China for the last decade or so. Given that the world is down to just a single anti-falciparum agent, and it is of fading effectiveness, wouldn't it be nice if absinthe were a 21st century quinine, a la gin & tonic -- tonic water has its origins as a palatable delivery system for a dose of exceedingly bitter quinine, the world's first antimalarial.

(I live in a tropical country, and at least two Thai provinces are rife with falciparum, a deadly brain-centered form of malaria, which can kill in as little as a few weeks.)

By Chevalier on Tuesday, August 07, 2001 - 04:20 pm: Edit

It's a short hop to humbug.

By Zack on Tuesday, August 07, 2001 - 04:03 pm: Edit

"What is the definition of "brainwash"?"

Isn't that a new television network?

By Artemis on Tuesday, August 07, 2001 - 02:55 pm: Edit

What is the definition of "brainwash"?

By Tabreaux on Tuesday, August 07, 2001 - 02:05 pm: Edit

Absinthe has always been considered as both an aperitif and a digestive.

By Chevalier on Tuesday, August 07, 2001 - 01:23 pm: Edit

Hobgoblin, I agree with you. It's as if we yanks have learned nothing from our Twain and Mencken, let alone the venerable "Mister Dooley".

Unrelenting earnestness can be a hoot.

By Heiko on Tuesday, August 07, 2001 - 01:20 pm: Edit

I found a good definition for aperitif - does it apply to absinthe? Judge for yourselves...

"A drink traditionally served before a meal to whet the appetite. It is usually a flavored bitters, vermouth, or a fine wine like Port."

http://www.flicks4fun.com/bar/drink_terminology.shtml

By Heiko on Tuesday, August 07, 2001 - 01:11 pm: Edit

"Sometimes there is a distinct lack of appreciation of irony and sarcasm on this forum."

Also applies to answers ;-)


And, uhm, again: What is bad about an aperitif?
According to what I know, "apéritif" translates to "appetizer" or "alcoholic beverage with which to start a good diner".
Absinthe is definitely a good appetizer and I like to drink it before a good meal. Of course I also drink it after a good meal, but I consider it to be perfect as an aperitif.

If anyone considers "aperitif" to be a four letter word, please tell me and I'm not going to insist that absinthe is an aperitif. This person will then not be allowed to order from SC anymore - they list all their absinthe under "aperitivos" :-)

By Lordhobgoblin on Tuesday, August 07, 2001 - 12:29 pm: Edit

Heiko,

"Absinthe has always been an aperitife"

You are putting yourself in great danger.

Hobgoblin

By Lordhobgoblin on Tuesday, August 07, 2001 - 12:27 pm: Edit

Chevalier,

A sad state of affairs when someone has to publicly announce whether he is joking or not. Sometimes there is a distinct lack of appreciation of irony and sarcasm on this forum. Maybe it's a cultural thing, anyway you'd be appreciated in the UK and Ireland (and also France, South Africa and Pakistan).

Hobgoblin

By Chevalier on Tuesday, August 07, 2001 - 09:20 am: Edit

Just to be clear:

I was having a little fun ... standing back a bit and taking the forum "with sugar", à la Verlaine. We need to laugh at ourselves from time to time. The reason that Jade is such a hot topic around here is because it IS creative, it IS exciting, and just about all of us ARE anxious to experience it. And yes, there is something funny about how anxious we are.

By Heiko on Tuesday, August 07, 2001 - 09:03 am: Edit

I don't understand No. 4

Absinthe has always been an aperitife, why should that change? What is bad about being an aperitif?

btw. I don't care if absinthe is considered to be an aperitif - I drink it when and where I want :-)

By Lordhobgoblin on Tuesday, August 07, 2001 - 08:37 am: Edit

Double post

By Lordhobgoblin on Tuesday, August 07, 2001 - 08:36 am: Edit

Chevalier,

You forgot.

1. "What is the thujone content of Jade?" (this poster will be condemned by all upstanding citizens on the forum and then ceremoniously burnt at the stake)

2. "Jade and Sprite mix well together"

3. "The 'secondary' effects of Jade" (similar response to 1.)

and we might even get someone saying

4. "Jade is an apertif" (open warfare then will break out)

By Heiko on Tuesday, August 07, 2001 - 08:22 am: Edit

You got the upcoming topics and questions - but do you also have the answers?

As long as you can't foretell what exactly people will say about Jade, this is not very interesting...

By Wolfgang on Tuesday, August 07, 2001 - 08:04 am: Edit

Do you have some "chevalier absinthe" to offer ? I'm sure we would be glad to talk about it...

By Chevalier on Monday, August 06, 2001 - 07:43 pm: Edit

Let's have a rub at the old crystal ball -- any empty snow globe will do -- and peer at the coming week's/month's/year's subtopic headings ...


"JL NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS!" (First reaction: disbelief!)

"MY JADE JUST ARRIVED IN THE MAIL!"

"JADE IS ____!!!" (insert worshipful/enthusiastic/
fanatical adjective here)

Many, many variations on "JADE IS ____!!!"

"JL'S BOTTLE SHAPE/CORK QUALITY (from which part of Portugal?)/LABEL TEXTURE (why isn't it vellum?)/etc., etc.

"SO WHEN IS GORGON COMING OUT?" (And multiple variations on this theme.)

"ANY JL ABSINTHE SPOONS?" (Just say "Frenchman")

"SEX AND JL"

"JADE TURNED MY FECES CHARTREUSE!"

"BEST WATER TO MIX WITH JL" (The winner will be flat Pellegrino)

From time to time, "WHERE CAN I GET JL?" (*sigh*)

"JADE VS. ________"(Or will it be beyond compare?)

And from some wag, the final word:
"I STILL PREFER HILL'S"

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