Versinthe different?

Sepulchritude Forum: The Absinthe Forum Thru December 2001: Versinthe different?
By _Blackjack on Wednesday, August 29, 2001 - 07:51 pm: Edit

No, "l'Amersinthe" is just what SC calls "l'Amesinthe," for some reason. I got a botle from them, and there is no "r" on the label. It's an honest mistake, since the label also calls it a "anis amer".

I am really curious to know whether or not there is really A. absinthium in there. Hey, Ted. Are you at liberty to say whether Ver- or L'amesinthe are included in the Great American Thujone Assay?

By Heiko on Wednesday, August 29, 2001 - 07:06 pm: Edit

Do I get this right?

L'Amesinthe is a sweeter version of Versinthe and L'AmeRsinthe is an even sweeter version of both?????

By Wolfgang on Wednesday, August 29, 2001 - 04:15 pm: Edit

Lamersinthe is another product (a sweeter version).

By Alphasoixante on Tuesday, August 28, 2001 - 02:04 pm: Edit

toutefois, toutefois, toutefois, toutefois.

By Heiko on Tuesday, August 28, 2001 - 02:01 pm: Edit

At Spiritscorner, they call it L'amersinthe - even better... makes it "lamer" in English and "bitter" in French :-)

By Heiko on Tuesday, August 28, 2001 - 01:58 pm: Edit

"Le gout est toutefois identique"

Hmmm, can "des autres armoises" taste exactly the same like art. absinthium?

Well, maybe it just tastes the same as much as coke tastes the same in Germany and the US (it doesn't - there's subtle differences...)

By Wolfgang on Tuesday, August 28, 2001 - 12:54 pm: Edit

Look at that! This the email I just got from La Liquoristerie de Provence :


Quote:

Oui versinthe est elaborée avec des plantes de grande absinthe.Toutefois
nous respectons la legislation européenne et donc les normes Toutefois aux
etats unis versinthe est faites avec des armoises pou respecter la
legislation locale. Le gout est toutefois identique.
Au quebec le produit versinthe est arrivée Il subit toutefois des analyses
avant sa commercialisation qui ne saurait tarder.
PASCAL ROLLAND




In short, that means Versinthe is made with artemisia absinthium BUT, for you, unlucky Americans, The Liquoristerie have made a special version without it.

By Chevalier on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 04:46 pm: Edit

It shows that we can drink absinthe and discuss Shakespeare in the same lifetime.

By Dr_Ordinaire on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 04:42 pm: Edit

The irony here is that Shakespeare, after retiring as an actor, spend the rest of his days engaging in...litigation, and, apparently, with good success.

And what the hell does this have to do with a certain green liqueur...?

By Melinelly on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 04:33 pm: Edit

vera, to answer your question, i believe you are correct :)

By Chevalier on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 04:33 pm: Edit

Uh ... what was the question again?

By Verawench on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 04:31 pm: Edit

Blah blah.

I haven't had my question answered.

By Chevalier on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 02:11 pm: Edit

Shakespeare said:

Bad guys kill lawyers. Good guys only desecrate their bones.

By Chevalier on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 02:03 pm: Edit

It's safe to say that Shakespeare must have had some legal troubles in his time.

By Artemis on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 01:41 pm: Edit

The twisted logic I mentioned was attributed to a firm named Dickstein (I kid you not), Shapiro, something something something.

Some more, from another lawyer enclave, was that Dick came up with the idea because killing the lawyers would deprive the King of the legal research he needed to prove that Cade had no royal lineage (DUH!).

Another lawyeristic revisionist opinion claimed that since lawyers were the only ones who thought for themselves, killing them would ensure Dick and Jack of a compliant mob to follow their lead!

If anybody still doubts Will's contempt for lawyers, let's hear from the Prince of Denmark:

HAMLET.
There's another: why may not that be the skull of a lawyer? Where be his quiddits now, his quillets, his cases, his tenures, and his tricks? why does he suffer this rude knave now to knock him about the sconce with a dirty shovel, and will not tell him of his action of battery? Hum! This fellow might be in's time a great buyer of land, with his statutes, his recognizances, his fines, his double vouchers, his recoveries: is this the fine of his fines, and the recovery of his recoveries, to have his fine pate full of fine dirt? will his vouchers vouch him no more of his purchases, and double ones too, than the length and breadth of a pair of indentures? The very conveyances of his lands will hardly lie in this box; and must the inheritor himself have no more, ha?

By Dr_Ordinaire on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 01:02 pm: Edit

"Sorry, but the line was spoken by Dick the Butcher in Henry the Sixth. It is very obviously a lawyer-bashing joke, as are many other examples from Will's works. It's pretty obvious he didn't give a damn about offending lawyers."

This is very interesting. A couple of years ago, or so, in San Diego's Old Globe theater's program for a Shakespeare play, a big lawyers firm's ad made that exact same affirmation: that Will's dictum was spoken by Richard the Third. And they also turned it into a praise for lawyers...

I don't recall the name of the lawyers' firm (Cary,...something) but isn't it strange that another firm in another city would make the same mistake?

Well, maybe not so strange if they're just copying their ad.

By Chevalier on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 11:47 am: Edit

Sparing their lives is one thing -- but to celebrate Elizabethan lawyers as "heroes"? That IS a twisted interpretation. It makes me wish that Shakespeare had given the line to Henry V. Just imagine ...


Mac. I do not know any lawyer so good a man as myself: so Chrish save me, I will cut off a lawyers head.

K. Hen. There is some soul of goodness in things evil, excepting lawyers. Follow your spirit; and, upon this charge cry ‘God for Harry! England and Saint George! Kill all the lawyers!’

Mac. What ish a lawyer? ish a villain, and a bastard, and a knave, and a rascal? What ish a lawyer? Who talks of a lawyer?


... and so on.

By Artemis on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 10:11 am: Edit

You're of course right that Dick was being made fun of right along with the lawyers, and no doubt you're correct about the audience's attitude toward mobs. A little detail, now that I've had some time to put it together:

Dick the Butcher is a killer, a member of a gang under one Jack Cade. Jack is a pretender to the throne. Jack gives a speech to his gang wherein he describes how things will be under his rule:

"There shall be in England seven half-penny loaves sold for a penny: the three-hoop'd pot shall have ten hoops; and I will make it felony to drink small beer: all the realm shall be in common; and in Cheapside shall my palfrey go to grass: and when I am king,- as king I will be, ... "

encouraged by applause, Jack goes on:

"I thank you, good people:- there shall be no money; all shall eat and drink on my score; and I will apparel them all in one livery, that they may agree like brothers, and worship me their lord."

Dick the Butcher then speaks up:

"The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers!"

The twisted interpretation of the modern lawyers is that, since lawyers were the guardians of society, the vanguard against anarchy, they must be killed first, lest they step in as the heroes that they are and nip Jack's revolution in the bud with their legalistic writs.

Yeah, right.

By Chevalier on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 09:54 am: Edit

You're quite right, it was Dick the Butcher, and Dick is a far cry from Richard. So much for my memory.

Dick is portrayed as an unschooled rube ... one of forty thousand unschooled rubes following Jack Cade. Forty thousand rubes make for a large mob. It's hard to believe that Shakespeare and his
audience -- lawyers or not -- would have sympathized much with Dick's "lawyer-killing" proclivities. Elizabethans had a keen horror of mobs (and the social turmoil that fueled them).

By Artemis on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 09:28 am: Edit

Sorry, but the line was spoken by Dick the Butcher in Henry the Sixth. It is very obviously a lawyer-bashing joke, as are many other examples from Will's works. It's pretty obvious he didn't give a damn about offending lawyers.

By Chevalier on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 09:17 am: Edit

Artemis wrote:
"I recently read an interesting piece wherein some lawyers tried to twist Will Shakespeare's "kill all the lawyers" line into a DEFENSE of lawyers. Only a lawyer could have come up with something so outrageously stupid."


Well, I'm no lawyer, thank God, but I do know that the Globe Theater's audience was packed with lawyers from the nearby Inns of Court, and that Shakespeare knew enough not to offend them. I also recall that Shakespeare had that infamous line uttered by Richard III.

In RICHARD III, the king was (slanderously) depicted as a hunchbacked despot. Despots kill lawyers and judges: witness Pol Pot, etc. The lawyers at the Globe were all too aware of this.

By Wolfgang on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 08:46 am: Edit

I guess they wanted to make it sound like '' L'Âme sainte'' witch means holy soul... It`s sad it sounds so bad in english, they should have know.

By Tabreaux on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 08:19 am: Edit

This is what they told me:

La différence entre Versinthe et lamesinthe : Versinthe a une amertume légèrement plus prononcée. Lamesinthe est plus souple et plus fraîche. Les deux produits sont toutefois issus d'une recette qui utilise plus de 20
macérations de plantes. Les deux produits appartiennent à la famille des anis.


I like Versinthe ok, but it doesn't taste like absinthe.

By Petermarc on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 08:17 am: Edit

it's funny 'cause it's true...

By Artemis on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 08:07 am: Edit

What they have to say about Shakespeare? That's what I was talking about when I said "outrageously stupid".

I couldn't care less what's in Lame-Sinthe, but now that I think about it, they would have to have no knowledge whatsoever of English, or not care about marketing to English-speaking people, to give a product that name.

By Wolfgang on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 07:52 am: Edit

I just sent them an email asking for some clarifications...We will see what they have to say about that...

By Artemis on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 07:44 am: Edit

"Grande absinthe...Is it not supposed to be A. Absinthium"

Grande Absinthe IS Artemisia Absinthium.

"They also explain why they put sugar in Lamesinthe (for legal and commercial reasons)."

No liqueur with sugar in it was considered absinthe in the 1880s. For legal and commercial reasons.

I recently read an interesting piece wherein some lawyers tried to twist Will Shakespeare's "kill all the lawyers" line into a DEFENSE of lawyers. Only a lawyer could have come up with something so outrageously stupid.

By Wolfgang on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 07:28 am: Edit

Wow! Those are very nice (way better than their ugly cheap spoons). I just can't beleive they realy use such a big sugar cube for such a small glass. One thing for sure, the Liquoristerie`s web site have been updated and they now put Versinthe and Lamesinthe under the ''absinthe'' section.

If your read the french version of the Versinthe section, they say : ''La macération de vingt plantes dont les plantes de grande absinthe ...''. Grande absinthe...Is it not supposed to be A. Absinthium ? They later say : ''Versinthe n'est surtout pas un Pastis, elle en est le noble ancêtre.'' : Versinthe is not a pastis but it`s noble ancestor.

They probably consulted an attorney who found a good loop hole in the system... That would also explain why those morons at the SAQ (the monopole who sells alcohol in Québec) have changed their mind and will import Bardouin instead of Versinthe... Very interesting development indeed.

Anyway, you must read the french version of their site, there`s a lot more interesting infos there. They also explain why they put sugar in Lamesinthe (for legal and commercial reasons).

By Absinthedrinker on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 06:15 am: Edit

Has anyone seen the neat modern reservoir glasses and fountain on the versinthe site?

http://perso.wanadoo.fr/liquoristerie-provence/indexgb.htm

By Tabreaux on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 05:42 am: Edit

Neither Versinthe nor L'Amesinthe are absinthe.

By Verawench on Wednesday, August 22, 2001 - 10:52 pm: Edit

Am I losing my mind or has SC's description of Versinthe changed? I could swear it was shorter and did not mention any wormwood content. It also didn't claim NOT being a pastis... right?

Hmmm....

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