Anyone for a good flaming

Sepulchritude Forum: The Absinthe Forum Thru December 2001: Anyone for a good flaming
By Absinthedrinker on Tuesday, October 02, 2001 - 02:05 am: Edit

Peter, I went to see Moulin Rouge in London when it opened and it is a must see. Not especially for the absinthe content - there really isn't that much, but the first half an hour or so is truely 'spectacular' Sabine would probably have a fit if she is sensitive to anachronisms, the music is based on them. It is the first time I have been to a film where the audience were clapping. I should point out that I saw it on September 10th, I doubt that the atmosphere would have been so upbeat the next day.

By Mr_Rabbit on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 06:30 pm: Edit

God help any girl who may eventually show up here that happens to really be named Kristy.

By Adjuster on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 05:14 pm: Edit

Dear Blackjack:
Thank you for your answer. I appreciate it, especially considering that it appears that I'm already being condemned as the rebirth of "Kristy".
Mark

By _Blackjack on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 05:08 pm: Edit

Mr. Wormwood's tests are not to be taken as gospel. He has admitted that the methods he used may not have rendered accurate results. There has not yet been a published analysis of the thujone content of various commercial (or non-) absinthes, tho there is one in the works, from our own Ted. Until there is hard data on paper, I wouldn't put stake in any claims of thujone/wormwood content from anyobdy, especially if they are trying to sell you something.

By Adjuster on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 04:50 pm: Edit

Hello All,
I am a newbie, so I apologize in advance if I blow it with a stupid question, or asking something that I should have been able to find in the archives, etc. From following a little while, I have my trepidations about just jumping in, but what the hell. Rome wasn't built in a day.

I have about 5 various brands of Absinthe now at home, but have only sampled 2. I find that the experience of trying something new is allot better shared. I have plenty of friends, but not that many that I would easily break open some swiss blueu with.
I also collect Port, and have learned (at great expense) that genorosity is a trait very easily taken advantage of. Enough of the boring stuff.

My question, without any reference at all to the party line, is as follows:

I have read Mr. Wormwood's thread. I understand James from Mari Mayan's rationale for the lack of AA in MM. I find it reasonable, and I think it is a quality product despite the debate over if it is truly Absinthe. Who cares if you like it? What I'm missing is that he also found no AA in Serpis. Unless I missed a later thread, it appears that (mostly) everyone loves the new 65, and I can't find any further discussion on the AA content of Serpis 55 or 65. I'm sure I will try both, I have an unopened 55 right here, but would love to know if that study still holds Serpis as devoid of AA totally.
Thanks,
Mark

By Chevalier on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 04:16 pm: Edit

Ok, Petermarc, let me prepare you a bit.

AN ARTEMISOPHILE'S GUIDE TO WATCHING "MOULIN ROUGE"

Chapter 1: Spoons.

Difficult to spot. Steel yourself for a fleeting glimpse of them torched in a distressing "flaming absinthe" scene.


Chapter 2: Glasses.

Lots and lots. Christian, the main character, has a pile weighing down his writing desk. Did he pinch them from cafés? Some nice examples. Watch for Toulouse-Lautrec's glass. I won't give away what kind it is. And note a particularly musical use for glasses filled with day-glo absinthe. Hint: think Lionel Hampton.


Chapter 3: Bottles and matchstrikers.

They're there. You'll see.

By Petermarc on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 03:16 pm: Edit

just the FAQ, mam, just the FAQ...
moulin rouge opens in paris on the third...i will be going
because, i have to...my wife says it doesn't look historically accurate, so she isn't really interested...uh, ok...had to go to pearl harbor alone, too...but i love wwII
airplanes 'n stuff...

By Admin on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 03:13 pm: Edit


Quote:

the only things flaming around 19th century glasses of absinthe were rimbaud, verlaine, oscar wilde, etc...



Mind if I put that in the FAQ? heh.

By Chevalier on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 03:09 pm: Edit

And what an unpleasant surprise it was to see "Toulouse-Lautrec" and company giddily torching absinthe in MOULIN ROUGE.

By Chrysippvs on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 03:08 pm: Edit

I want see a half drunk fellow try to pour a nice flamming piece of sugar in a glass of 70% alcohol.

Fire Marshall Bill: "Absinth huh?..Lemme stell ya something!"

By Mr_Rabbit on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 02:34 pm: Edit

Given the sheer amount of paintings, sculpture, etc, involving absinthe, if people were setting it on fire you can bet someone would have recorded the act.

But no one did.

Has anyone seen a Czech painting involving absinthe from that period?

By Heiko on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 02:26 pm: Edit

"(1) The burning of sugar in a spoon seems to mimic the preparation of heroin.

(2) This is a convenient way of distracting one's attention from the fact that Czech 'absinth' does not louche (unlike what is immortalized in the old descriptions)."

May I add

(3) The caramelized sugar makes swill more drinkable while it probably ruins the fine flavor of real absinthe.

(4) Todays marketing wants to imply that absinthe is "crazy", "wild" and "evil" - therefore the rather contemplative dripping of cold water over sugar doesn't fit in this picture

By Chrysippvs on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 01:49 pm: Edit

LOL Peter..

By Petermarc on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 01:27 pm: Edit

the only things flaming around 19th century glasses of absinthe were rimbaud, verlaine, oscar wilde, etc...

By Tavarua on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 01:05 pm: Edit

Thanks Ted.

Always dependable for delivering historically accurate info in a polite manner.

By Tabreaux on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 12:35 pm: Edit

As was pointed out below, in the days before pocket lighters, match strikers were solely used for lighting of smokables. These items were placed on cafe tables for convenience, and were undoubtedly provided by the drink makers as a tidy source of advertisement.

The lighting of 'absinth' is purely a recent Czech fabrication (or lie in some cases), and is probably rooted in two psychological aims:

(1) The burning of sugar in a spoon seems to mimic the preparation of heroin.

(2) This is a convenient way of distracting one's attention from the fact that Czech 'absinth' does not louche (unlike what is immortalized in the old descriptions).

Clearly, one who is both adventurous and ignorant, who believes that drinking Czech 'absinth' will deliver hallucinations may be excited by this novelty. But it is absolutely a recently fabricated novelty and has no historical basis whatsoever.

By Tavarua on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 12:28 pm: Edit

I am sure modern, strike anywhere matches would work fine, but in practice, as they would probably damage the antique match strikers, ironically enough.

By Wolfgang on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 12:15 pm: Edit

I also think that drunk customers would set the whole matchsticker aflame ;-)

By Wolfgang on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 12:14 pm: Edit

Probably. I wonder if it`s still possible to buy matchstick than can be easyly lighted on a ceramic matchsticker... Not very safe me think...

By Zman7 on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 11:51 am: Edit

To light your cigarettes or cigars as a convienence for cafe customers, methinks....

By Tavarua on Monday, October 01, 2001 - 11:39 am: Edit

It seems that whenever someone brings up the flaming sugar on the spoon, a lot of people get upset and claim that this is improper and an invention of the Czeck spirit companies. However, match strikers often turn up as legitimate vintage absinthe pieces, such as the one currently on E-bay. I know that anything seen on E-bay should be taken with a grain of salt, but I have seen these many times, not just E-bay. Someone please enlighten me,

Tavarua.

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