Test

Sepulchritude Forum: The Absinthe Forum Archive Thru March 2002: Archive thru January 2002:Test
By Artist on Sunday, February 03, 2002 - 01:35 pm: Edit

By the way, I found this in a lovely little shopping/eating district in Los Angeles...

By Artist on Sunday, February 03, 2002 - 01:31 pm: Edit

I happened to find this growing...is it what I think it is (which would this be, A. A. or A. P.)?


What is this?

By Artist on Saturday, December 29, 2001 - 11:16 am: Edit

Ah, now I see...

It kinda follows the truism - the more ripe and mature a fruit gets, the sweeter it is...

By Luger on Saturday, December 29, 2001 - 07:05 am: Edit

Good guesses all, but,,,,,,,

Juniper flowers in May-June ( Where I live ).
The pollinated flower shuts it's three upper leaves and transforms itself into a "berrie". The "cross" on the berrie is a rest of these leaves.
It is green, but the year thereafter it turns purple!
That is why green and purple berries can be found at the same bush!
That is also why some green ( turpentine tasting ) berries somehow finds it's way into commercial Gin!

Cheers: Luger

By Artist on Saturday, December 29, 2001 - 04:02 am: Edit

My guess...

The Juniper is polysexual and the purple are female and the green are male...(*grin*) - just kidding...I'm not sure.

The only thing that makes sense to me is that it somehow has to do with reproduction and increasing the chance of success...

Maybe the sweet (purple) ones attract foragers and allow the plant to use the green ones to reproduce...

Or, it's just a method of increasing the chance that some of the berries (seeds) will make it to the ground because most berry eaters would eat one or the other, but not both...

By Luger on Saturday, December 29, 2001 - 02:30 am: Edit

>The purple ones (the ones that taste good)...

Yes. You know more about this, than most Gin makers do.
They do not know that just a single green "berrie" makes the whole batch taste like turpentine.
So why are there two kinds of "berries" on the same plant?

By Artist on Saturday, December 29, 2001 - 02:24 am: Edit

The purple ones (the ones that taste good)...

By Luger on Saturday, December 29, 2001 - 01:57 am: Edit

>juniper...use the ones that are good

And which ones are good?
No use checking out the Gin-pages, because they don't seem to know :-)

Luger

By Luger on Saturday, December 22, 2001 - 10:02 am: Edit

>Maybe those are juniper berries?

TAMTADAA!!!

You're the winner!

By Don_Walsh on Saturday, December 22, 2001 - 07:17 am: Edit

As we do not use coriander, although I have a few Kg on hand for experimental purposes, I feel no compunction about discussing what it costs in the real world away from the hippie herbalists who have NOTHING to do with real commerce.

Retail by the Kg: $2.50

Wholesale by the ton: metric $1 per Kg. And that's delivered, after shipping and 40% duty. And a middleman taking a profit. Figure at the source, maybe 40 cents a Kg. Maybe 20 cents a Kg.

Shove that up the 'prized' small coriander from the temperate climes and smoke it.

By Don_Walsh on Saturday, December 22, 2001 - 07:12 am: Edit

I bet if you take the NZ coriander and divide it by 3-4, i.e., the alleged difference in oil content, that the tropical coriander will still be cheaper, and so even though you need more of it to produce the same amount of essential oil -- you will still be ahead of the game.

The difference between the economies is greater than the difference between the productivity of the larger vs smaller corianders.

By Petermarc on Saturday, December 22, 2001 - 05:42 am: Edit

i agree...juniper...use the ones that are good...

By Artist on Saturday, December 22, 2001 - 02:11 am: Edit

Maybe those are juniper berries?

By Luger on Saturday, December 22, 2001 - 02:05 am: Edit

Oh, and it is not even real seeds, what is it?

By Luger on Saturday, December 22, 2001 - 01:32 am: Edit

Phuuuuuu!!!

This herb has also two kinds of seeds.
What separates them, and which one should one use.
????

By Luger on Saturday, December 22, 2001 - 01:29 am: Edit

One more try before I hang myself:

strange.jpg

By Cheri on Friday, December 21, 2001 - 11:17 am: Edit

It kinda looks like a stalk of brocolli coming out of a file folder..

By Petermarc on Friday, December 21, 2001 - 10:06 am: Edit

genepi, known for its high cost and inability to be filmed...also, it doesn't have a reflection in mirrors...

By Luger on Friday, December 21, 2001 - 09:58 am: Edit

Sigh!!!

Well if you can name *that* herb, you'll be my superhero,,,,,,,

By Luger on Friday, December 21, 2001 - 09:56 am: Edit

1,strange.bmp

By Luger on Friday, December 21, 2001 - 09:52 am: Edit

Ok, Pete, what is this then?

1,strange.bmp

By Petermarc on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 03:48 pm: Edit

carda

By Petermarc on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 03:45 pm: Edit

i protest! without 'don's scratch 'n sniff monitor'...patent pending...things could get out of hand...

By Luger on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 03:17 pm: Edit

>Did I win something (other than personal knowledge >;-) ) ?

Yes you did. My deepest respect!!!

By Tavarua on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 02:21 pm: Edit

Only because they mention it's use in margerita's and shooters. Who knows, it could taste like Triple Sec, since that is the only other prevailing flavor in a good margerita.

By Cheri on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 11:01 am: Edit

no particular reason.. serpis and I are just having a disagreement lately...

By Wolfgang on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 10:19 am: Edit

Tav - Why do you say it's tequilla ?

Cheri - why ?

By Cheri on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 10:09 am: Edit

Probably tastes like Serpis.

By Tavarua on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 10:05 am: Edit

Tequila liqueur? That sounds about as tasty as Rosanne Bar's taint. Of course I'm not a big tequila fan, unless I'm quite inebriated. "Tequila shooters", hell no, but I might try it in a margurita.

By Wolfgang on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 09:33 am: Edit

Now about another herb...Damiana...

Have you tasted this liquor ? Effects ?
Damiana liquor web site

By Wolfgang on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 08:50 am: Edit

Ok, I found it there : http://www.ibiblio.org/herbmed/pictures/pic-b-d2.html (look at coriandrum-sativum-1.jpg ).

for the seeds...


Quote:

In commerce, coriander is broadly divided into two types according to the size of the fruit. Fruit size is an indication of volatile oil content and suitability for particular end uses. Variety vulgare or macrocarpum has a fruit diameter of 3-5 mm while var. microcarpum fruits have a diameter of 1.5-3 mm. Large fruited types are grown mainly by tropical and subtropical countries, e.g. Morocco, India and Australia and contain a low volatile oil content (0.1-0.4%). They are used extensively for grinding and lending purposes in the spice trade. Types with smaller fruit are produced in temperate regions and usually have a volatile oil content of around 0.4-1.8%, and are therefore highly valued as a raw material for the preparation of essential oil.




ref.: http://www.crop.cri.nz/psp/broadshe/coriand.htm

Did I win something (other than personal knowledge ;-) ) ?

By Cheri on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 06:17 am: Edit

It's just that wild and wacky world of absinthe..

By Artemis on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 02:52 am: Edit

And my original flower is indeed Hyssop. Amazing how a thread that was started only as a testing ground for my Head P. thread evolved into something fun and informative.

By Artemis on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 02:48 am: Edit

I grow lemon balm and I've got it hanging, drying, in jars, etc. but I've never seen it take that alien-looking configuration on the left. That must be an extreme closeup of the blossoms, which are tiny. It typically looks like the photo on the right. It indeed looks much like any other mint; it's basically a mint.

I hope my good friend Luger will forgive me for playing around. His photos are of coriander. I don't know the difference between the seeds, but Luger's skill at rooting out exotic herbs is legendary in underground circles.

By Don_Walsh on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 02:45 am: Edit

If we could do scratch n' sniff over cyber this would be a piece of cake. As a botanist I suck. As a herbalist within the narrow confines of about twenty species we use or have evaluated or experimented with, I know the herbs, theur tastes and smells, their appearance, their taxonomy, their oils and constituents of the oils.

But show me a whole plant on a pc screen and give me no scent and I am a goner.

I spent my afternoon visiting Bangkok's premiere Chinese herbal pharmacy, ordering a metric ton of one of our herbs and advising the proprietor about how to get the fine herbal dust out of his macerated 15% alcohol herbal tonic...he's using a three-layer filter-pad press and it is not doing the job. A membrane filter is how he ought to go.

INCIDENTALLY no one in Thailand, and I mean graduate pharmacists both traditional and modern, has EVER heard of a health problem associated with Star Anise (Illicum or Illicium verum Hook.) and we eat a lot of food seasoned with Star Anise in this country.

SO I think that British warning is a false alarm.

By Artist on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 02:02 am: Edit

It might be more recognizable as "Melissa"...(more commonly known as lemon balm).

By Luger on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 02:00 am: Edit

Well, from now on I'll have to put you in the same box as those people throwing some sticks of oak in the moonshine, and then calling it "Scotch Whisky".
They let you taste it, and if you then give a diplomatic review, they tell everyone "I fooled him, he could tell no difference between my Whisky and the real Johnnie Walker".

I have to leave for work now, have a nice day!!!

Luger

By Luger on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 01:51 am: Edit

"what is: i don't know the flower, but the seeds look like cardamom and juniper?.."

No and no. Besides, it's all the same but different versions!

By Artist on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 08:40 pm: Edit

The common name would be lemon (L. Frank) balm...

By Bob_Chong on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 07:24 pm: Edit

Artist:

It looks like catnip or something else from the mint family.

BC

By Artist on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 05:22 pm: Edit

Okay,

My serious contribution...What are they (flowers and leaves of the same plant)?

flowers leaves

artist.

By Petermarc on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 04:41 pm: Edit

i'll take 'street bum drinking hair tonic for $200'

what is: i don't know the flower, but the seeds look like cardamom and juniper?...

By Artemis on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 04:15 pm: Edit

One of them burns on the way in, and on the way out too if you eat too much of it.

The other, you can't stop eating.

By Luger on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 04:14 pm: Edit

"Every insider knows all these are also used in the best absinthes."

Well what is the name then? Anybody?
And what is the difference between the seeds?
Anybody?
This is important!!!!!

The details separates the streetbum drinking hair-tonic from the enthusiast that argues with his best friend whether "Chateau Fameuese" use European or Russian Oak in their barrels.

Have you done your homework?
Anybody?'Don? ( That seems to be awake all day and all night all year long! )

I´m going to sleep now, and it's going to be a damn good sleep, becaus I know that most of you are rotating in your beds while trying to figure this out!

Have a nice day!!!

Luger

By Luger on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 04:06 pm: Edit

"Every insider knows all these are also used in the best absinthes."

Almost, but what is the difference of the two kinds of seeds?

By Artemis on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 04:01 pm: Edit

Wildwood weed, pistachios, and peppercorns?

Every insider knows all these are also used in the best absinthes.

By Luger on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 03:54 pm: Edit

Ok, what is this then?
( If I get the picture to appear before your intoxicated eyes ? )

quiz.jpg

By Artemis on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 03:53 pm: Edit

Lizzie McGuire is her name!!!

Good luck trying to collect, though!

By Luger on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 03:42 pm: Edit

What do I win?

What is her name???

By Luger on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 03:42 pm: Edit

It is our dear little herb HYSSOP!
Hyssopus officinalis, used in the coloringstep of Hills,,,,maybe. :-)

Nice picture though.

By Artemis on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 03:33 pm: Edit

Tell it, Luger. By the way, I did get that package.

By Artist on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 03:29 pm: Edit

To de flower.
The rose.

By Luger on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 03:29 pm: Edit

Am I allowed to say what it is?

By Artist on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 03:28 pm: Edit

Damn it, damn it, damn it, didn't that work?

By Artist on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 03:27 pm: Edit

To de-flowerThe Rose

By Petermarc on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 03:17 pm: Edit

de-flowered?

By Artemis on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 03:12 pm: Edit

flower flower

By Artemis on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 03:09 pm: Edit

Pictures, maybe. No equis.

By Artist on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 02:15 pm: Edit

This means we are going to see some "xxx" movies...

By Tavarua on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 01:56 pm: Edit

Is this a math test?

By Artemis on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 01:55 pm: Edit

If you have to ask, you fail.

By Artemis on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 01:45 pm: Edit

xxx

Administrator's Control Panel -- Board Moderators Only
Administer Page |Delete Conversation |Close Conversation |Move Conversation