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The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. _ The Fee Verte Absinthe Buyers Guide _ Absinthe St. Antoine

Posted by: hartsmar Jul 11 2008, 10:23 AM

AVERAGE SCORE 76


The following reviews are for the first batch

Reviewed by mthuilli 5/29/2008

COLOR BEFORE WATER 7/10
Nice dark olive with an amber tint, but too deep.

LOUCHE ACTION 5/10
Louches correctly with slow iced water drip and specially with sugar. Quickly overwaters, needs great care. A very light (or almost none) louche without sugar and regular drip. So let's say it does louche decently if carefully prepared.

COLOR AFTER WATER 5/10
If correctly louched, retains its nice deep olive tint, but overall not very inviting because of its lack of opalescence.

AROMA 21/30
Alcohol is not overpowering, nice floral bouquet (thanks Veronica!), just lacks a little something on the balance and complexity side, like a rich wormwood or a savory anise aroma.

MOUTH-FEEL 4/10
Slightly biting but thin.

TASTE 8/20
That's where it hurts. Not really unpleasant but clearly shows some flaws. Over-distilled that conducts to a non-existent wormwood flavor and almost non-existent anise and fennel flavors. Over-colored that conducts to overpowering pontica/hyssop/veronica flavors. Result : totally unbalanced. I gave it a 8 specially for the veronica that leaves a nice finish.

OVERALL IMPRESSION 7/10
It's not a bad product per se, it's even really encouraging coming from that part of Europe (hence the 7 for the encouragements and the lovely bottle and label), and I'm sure Martin can easily improve it by lightening his distillation method and by having a less heavy hand on the coloration step.
This is the best Czech absinthe I've ever tasted (ok, easy one), and (I hope) soon to be a good absinthe as such.

mthuilli scores St Antoine 57 out of 100


Reviewed by absinthist 5/28/2008

COLOR BEFORE WATER 10/10
My sample is a nice almost feuille morte with a shade of greenish and little yellow. Looks natural and smells natural.

LOUCHE ACTION 4/10
Delicate, at 1:1-1:2, there are oils dancing only. Becomes translucent, rather not opaque. Be careful or you overwater it.

COLOR AFTER WATER 9/10
Becomes green, very nice to look at. Confirms the natural colouration.

AROMA 25/30
Veronica. Some pontica, and anise. Pleasant, not much of alcohol smell, inviting.

MOUTH-FEEL 4/10
Rounded, spicy, a bit unbalanced.

TASTE 18/20
Veronica in the front and veronica in the back, ladies and gentlemen, this is veronica bomb! Second comes pontica, so definitely colouration was strong and definite, then some little hyssop becomes snitty, and there is a nice floral wormwood aspect, whilst anethole buddies are in the back. Taste is complex, spicy, unusual but quite nice.

OVERALL IMPRESSION 7/10
A real Durchbruch in absinthes made in the Czech Republic. It will not appeal to everyone because of strong colouration and delicate louche action, but I am very satisfied with it and I must add I am making the 2nd glass of St. Antoine, just for pleasure. That absinthe requires some work: louche department needs fining, wormwood note should be more pronounced, and colouring herbs subdued, of course, but it is a nice, traditional if unusual product.

absinthist scores Absinthe St. Antoine 77 out of 100


Reviewed by spoon 6/3/2008

COLOR BEFORE WATER 7/10
Attractive dark olive/amber.

LOUCHE ACTION 3/10
I couldn’t get it to louche as well as mthuilli. I don’t use sugar, but I always use very cold water and lots of ice in the fountain, with a slow drip. The louche was very thin.

COLOR AFTER WATER 4/10
Not terribly attractive thinly translucent drab olive.

AROMA 18/30
Neat, I smell the nice aroma of the coloring herbs, with some nice floral character. I don’t smell the alcohol at all. After louche, it’s just a bit weaker.

MOUTH-FEEL 4/10
Thin and slightly biting, but the more I sip it the less I find it objectionable.

TASTE 9/20
Almost all I can taste are the coloring herbs. There’s only a weak presence of wormwood, anise, and fennel. It’s actually rather pleasant, but is clearly lacking the most important flavors that should be in absinthe. Before this, I wasn’t really sure what veronica tastes like, but now I’m pretty sure I recognize it. That aspect is quite nice.

OVERALL IMPRESSION 6/10
I wanted to like it more. The bottle and label are beautiful, far better than most. And of course it’s far above the normal Czech crapsinthe. It’s clearly made with quality ingredients, distilled without a trace of tails etc. but it’s just lacking in anise/wormwood/fennel presence. I hope Martin will try some of our suggestions (no triple distillation, gentler coloration). I think with some tweaking it could be much better. My overall score seems a bit harsh to me, but I can't really justify raising the scores for any of the categories. It's not undrinkable, it's just flawed.

spoon scores St Antoine 51 out of 100


Reviewed by Ricki 5th June 2008

COLOR BEFORE WATER 7/10
Very clear and nice looking amber/olive colour.

LOUCHE ACTION 3/10
I could barely get a louche out of Absinthe St Antoine and i was really trying hard to make it louche. Low points here.

COLOR AFTER WATER 4/10
Slightly cloudy and the colour is a bit lighter than before water. Nothing special.

AROMA 20/30
The aroma is very nice before adding water. Water just dilutes these aromas slightly but doesn't lose them.

MOUTH-FEEL 4/10
Mouth feel is thin but smooth with a slight bite afterwards.

TASTE 9/20
Slightly medicinal in taste. A bit weak though.

OVERALL IMPRESSION 6/10
The best Czech Absinthe out there but not good enough to compete with the French and Swiss variety just yet.

Ricki scores St Antoine 53 out of 100


The following reviews are for the second batch

Reviewed by absinthist 12/15/2008

COLOR BEFORE WATER 10/10
Green-yellowish, at least neither lightfast green nor undercoloured. My score is obvious.

LOUCHE ACTION 5/10
Translucent, needs very cold water. Better than previously but still it is not that mocca goodness.

COLOR AFTER WATER 8/10
Green with strong yellowish tinge.

AROMA 27/30
Pontica. Herbal but spicy, no trace of funk from alcohol. Clean base.

MOUTH-FEEL 6/10
Assertive and bold. More balanced. Herbal but not too heavy on the palate.

TASTE 19/20
Pontica, wormwood, angelica with anethole buddies gently swing in the background providing spiciness. Some bitterness lingers and transforms into mild sensation of herbacousness.

OVERALL IMPRESSION 8/10
#1 is light years from the #2 offering. More in the vein of traditional absinthe than previous one, needs some work in the louche department, but the rest is very, very promising and I bet Martin will be developing that extrait further and further.

absinthist scores Absinthe St. Antoine (2nd batch) 83 out of 100



The following reviews are for the third batch


Reviewed by absinthist 8/26/2009

COLOR BEFORE WATER 10/10
That is the colour less demanding people will like as it is vivid green and I will like it as well, as the colour is not too pale as in most of the cases, with few glorious exceptions. A strong and well-earned 10.

LOUCHE ACTION 9/10
Begins like in 2nd batch, so very nice long oil trails, but then gets greatly opaque and turbulent. I am glad Martin has listened to Bitter Bogz' advice and in that department it has paid greatly back.

COLOR AFTER WATER 10/10
Typical absinthe colour, yet not whitish but greenish, hence no flaws.

AROMA 28/30
Very good and clean anise, permanence of of veronica married with wormwood.

MOUTH-FEEL 7/10
Badiane spiciness coats the mouth that is hit by herbal sensation of meticulous quality, not exactly light one, but not too heavy, either.

TASTE 15/20
is complex and requires 1:4 to open fully. The veronica has its say and it is good to hear her trying to be louder than wormwood, pontica, delicate hyssop, very discreet melissa and gentle badiane touch.

OVERALL IMPRESSION 9/10
That particular batch is light years from 1st and 2nd, I woyuld describe that extrait as orchestral due to its complexity, immensly pronounced wormwood (not shy gigolo anymore) and well-placed anethole buddies. I am glad Martin has taken my advice to his heart and produced something that can really compete with some of the better brands out there. I would put it now in the league of Vieux Carre.

absinthist scores St. Antoine (3rd batch) 88 out of 100


Reviewed by Absinthia 09/22/2009

COLOR BEFORE WATER 9/10
Beautiful "peroquet" green, with a hint of yellow playing through it. A great improvement compared to the first batch which was too dark and murky.

LOUCHE ACTION 9/10
Ah, very beautiful! Hypnotizing oil swirls all the way, making the drink end up in a thick, milky, green-yellow tinted whole. Yet somehow the aroma doesn't spread across the room, like with some brands of absinthe.

COLOR AFTER WATER 9/10
A mighty thick, creamy, greenish glass of absinthe.

AROMA 22/30
Before louching: a very gentle, fragile balance of wormwood, anise, and coriander I believe. A very inviting aroma, with just a little hint of the alcohol strength it contains.
After louching: still gentle and delicate, like a shy, fragile woman. Pontica or wormwood is definitely there. The coriander-like aroma is now stronger, but there also is a hint of fennel now. Anise moved to the background. Something else is there which I cannot identify. Maybe tasting it will clear things up.

MOUTH-FEEL 7/10
The first sip tells me there's either been a very powerful sort of wormwood in the distillate, or a great deal of pontica in the coloring. It isn't bitter though, it teases you up to a certain point, and rather has a particular dryness with a clear absinthe taste.

TASTE 18/20
Now, contrary to many an absinthe, this 3rd batch St. Antoine has clear wormwood first, followed by a sweet aftertaste of anise, fennel, and something floral. At some point while emptying the glass I'd have said violets, because that's what it reminded me of. In the end there's that subtle dryness, leaving you wanting for another sip.

OVERALL IMPRESSION 8/10
Absinthe St. Antoine 3rd batch is great! It has a strong wormwood or pontica profile, yet at the same time there are other instruments that complete this impressive symphony and make it a beautiful experience. Each sip is a different sensation. Ask me what to change, and I would say "nothing". I only wonder how aging would affect this one.

Absinthia scores Absinthe St. Antoine (3rd batch) 82 out of 100


Reviewed by Green Baron 3/9/2010

COLOR BEFORE WATER 9/10
Clear, vivid and natural amber-olive-green. The sample I had was a bit young, which contributed to the brightness, but I’d bet this will settle into a nice amber or peridot.

LOUCHE ACTION 8/10
Great fog bank and bouncing tendrils, good pace.

COLOR AFTER WATER 8/10
Thickish but good and opaque; light olive.

AROMA 22/30
-Before water- Mild anethole along with sharp star anise, herbaceous and earthy.

-After water- Distinctly fragrant and dryly floral wormwood, citrus; anise and fennel are mild but subtly juicy in the back. Star anise is still one of the most prominent scents, and though I know not much of it was used, I feel it comes across as just a bit too cloying and distracting.

MOUTH-FEEL 7/10
Good body and smoothness, perhaps a bit too numbing, with a dry, slowly receding zang in the finish.

TASTE 17/20
Enjoyably mild spice, citrus and minty notes up front. The tasty A.a. from the aroma is very prominent and contributes the same dry floral character, along with strong but well balanced savory bitter. The anise and fennel provide a backbone roll, but are nice and full. It’s interesting, but I did not perceive the star anise in the actual flavor, only the aroma.

OVERALL IMPRESSION 8/10
I found this absinthe overall to be very enjoyable and would recommend it. The big wormwood character is similar to Pontarlier, but is different enough to distinguish itself and is obviously very high quality (if I’m not mistaken, it’s the same stuff used to make L’Italienne). Though I know that very little star anise was used, it still detracted from the aroma for me. However, it did not detract from the flavor, which I found to one of the better, more expressive wormwood forward profiles I’ve had in recently.

Since it was young at the time of tasting, I wonder if the cloying from the badiane aroma will dissipate with time and how long that might take. I recently had some PF Taragona 1950, and though the presence of star anise was about as obvious, it somehow wasn’t bothersome in the least.

PERSONAL NOTES
Batch 3; 3-4:1 ratios tasted; with and without sugar.

Green Baron scores St. Antoine (Batch 3) 79 out of 100


The following reviews are for the fourth batch


Reviewed by absinthist 1/19/2010

COLOR BEFORE WATER 9/10
excellent, could be that dark as with mead proto

LOUCHE ACTION 10/10
excellent, following the Art

COLOR AFTER WATER 10/10
jolie tinge of greenish chrome yellow subdued with creaminess

AROMA 28/30
The top notch quality anise you will find in a few products only (some CO, some HG), melissa, veronica and wormwood.

MOUTH-FEEL 9/10
The spiciness in its glory evokes the spirit of long forgotten nuanceful sensation, a bit heavy, nevertheless, spot on

TASTE 19/20
Saints are alike, so St. Hieronimus likes St. Antoine. It is just a little sweet, well-pronounced wormwoody and the hints of veronica poking at you. Really meticulous combo of the tastes

OVERALL IMPRESSION 8/10
a definite improvement if I treat sentimentally both #2 and #3

absinthist scores St. Antoine (4th batch) 93 out of 100


The following reviews are for the fifth batch

Reviewed by absinthist 4/15/2010

COLOR BEFORE WATER 9/10
Marvellous, jolie verte. Could be darker

LOUCHE ACTION 10/10
Tremendous and Pernod fils thick

COLOR AFTER WATER 10/10
more greenish than yellowish, creamy, opaque

AROMA 29/30
veronica and wormwood with the aura of top notch anise crispiness

MOUTH-FEEL 10/10
Herbaceous and gentle. Wafts like a breeze on a tongue, not that heavy as in #4

TASTE 19/20
Begins as if it was sweeter than #4, but more bitterness and herbaceousness come thru. Very balanced but not overbalanced.

OVERALL IMPRESSION 9/10
Since verte is so a propos, Martin should think about an equally excellent blanche

PERSONAL NOTES
This one was from Batch #5

absinthist scores St. Antoine #5 96 out of 100

Posted by: Spoon Jul 11 2008, 01:02 PM

I think you dropped this:

QUOTE
[ ]










Posted by: hartsmar Jul 12 2008, 08:20 AM

Thanks! I put it in its right place.

Posted by: absinthist Dec 15 2008, 08:43 PM

Absinthe St. Antoine #2

Reviewed by absinthist 12/15/2008

...review merged into main review post above...

absinthist scores Absinthe St. Antoine #2 83 out of 100

Posted by: OCvertDe Dec 15 2008, 11:41 PM

Wow… 83? That would be a mindblowing improvement from one batch to the next. I hope mine gets here soon!

Posted by: Jaded Prole Dec 16 2008, 12:44 AM

Remember, he like tansy.

Posted by: Nephrite Dec 16 2008, 06:17 AM

Tansy isn't bad if handled properly.

Posted by: sixela Dec 16 2008, 07:48 AM

In a bitter, yeah -- but in an absinthe?

Posted by: absinthist Dec 16 2008, 09:40 AM

QUOTE(Nephrite @ Dec 15 2008, 10:17 PM) *

Tansy isn't bad if handled properly.

Ha! Sixer, get yer ass over at Zenzero's place-he sure has some vdt'2009 PR left. Or not™.

Posted by: absinthist Dec 16 2008, 09:49 AM

QUOTE(Jaded Prole @ Dec 15 2008, 04:44 PM) *

Remember, he like tansy.

Remember OCvertDe, Prol doesn't like grammar harhar.gif

Posted by: absinthist Dec 16 2008, 01:28 PM

QUOTE(sixela @ Dec 15 2008, 11:48 PM) *

In a bitter, yeah -- but in an absinthe?

See? You are not present for a longer while and you stop http://www.feeverte.net/forum/index.php?s=&showtopic=4260&view=findpost&p=162299 or browsing http://www.feeverte.net/forum/index.php?s=&showtopic=4260&view=findpost&p=164062

Posted by: absinthist Aug 26 2009, 09:07 PM

...

88/100


Editor's note: Review merged into main review post above

Posted by: OCvertDe Aug 27 2009, 01:45 AM

He's up to batch 3 now? After my sample of the second iteration got lost in the mail, I figured I'd heard the last of it.

Posted by: Tibro Aug 27 2009, 07:35 AM

Certain curiosities of Boggy's rating still confound me.

QUOTE(absinthist @ Dec 15 2008, 10:43 PM) *

Absinthe St. Antoine #2
COLOR BEFORE WATER 10/10
Green-yellowish, at least neither lightfast green nor undercoloured. My score is obvious.

QUOTE(absinthist @ Aug 26 2009, 11:07 PM) *

Color before: 10/10

That is the colour less demanding people will like as it is vivid green and I will like it as well, as the colour is not too pale as in most of the cases, with few glorious exceptions. A strong and well-earned 10.

Although he seems to credit himself as more demanding than some, Boggy still allows that a wide range of colors are flawless for a verte. I'd be interested in a fuller exegesis of his ideas of proper color for a verte.


QUOTE(absinthist @ Dec 15 2008, 10:43 PM) *

Absinthe St. Antoine #2

TASTE 19/20
Pontica, wormwood, angelica with anethole buddies gently swing in the background providing spiciness. Some bitterness lingers and transforms into mild sensation of herbacousness.

QUOTE(absinthist @ Aug 26 2009, 11:07 PM) *


Taste: 15/20

is complex and requires 1:4 to open fully. The veronica has its say and it is good to hear her trying to be


And this certainly doesn't bode very well. He appreciates the third batch overall by a point more and yet rates the taste four points lower than the previous batch. A lot of people think taste is a damn important factor in the overall quality of a product. Can I surmise that taste is of lower importance for Boggy?

Then there are the clear allusions to the help he has given Martin in making improvements to this third batch. This is all well and good. I salute his efforts to help others with their projects, and I don't mean any slight to Martin by accepting help. The ones that turn down help are far more puzzling to me. But I do have to wonder at Boggy's objectivity when submitting this review. He clearly seems to relish his role and wants credit for giving that help, but is the relish slathered on just a bit for his own benefit in the score? Again, no slight to Martin's efforts, I'm looking forward to trying this one myself, but I have to question the rater's objectivity.

Posted by: martin.zufanek Aug 27 2009, 10:05 AM

Hello Tim,

I strongly believe that Boggy is objective and he simply enjoyed third batch.

Antoine the Third has still the same recipe, his advices was about colouring process and badiane, Antoine has now lighter shadows of green with touch of gold, second batch is more dead leaf style.

Posted by: Absomphe Aug 27 2009, 03:35 PM

QUOTE(absinthist @ Aug 26 2009, 02:07 PM) *

The veronica has its say and it is good to hear her trying to be louder than wormwood.


As long as it doesn't come close to succeeding.

Posted by: absinthist Aug 27 2009, 04:18 PM

QUOTE(Tibro @ Aug 26 2009, 11:35 PM) *

Although he seems to credit himself as more demanding than some, Boggy still allows that a wide range of colors are flawless for a verte. I'd be interested in a fuller exegesis of his ideas of proper color for a verte.

Although Martin has said everything, I will come back to that aspect. The full exegesis of proper colouration is to be found in Fritsch, in Brevans, in the writings of Bailly regarding Pernod fils as well as in the widely-available protocols regarding that very matter. There are 7 methods of colourations that are described thoroughly and to be found in books, recipes, eye witnesses' accounts etc; colouration has been developing thru all the ages and even after the invention of the colourators, there have been many other different methods applied, not only in the making of absinthe, but regarding other spirits as well. As of nowadays, I can cite Cheryl's, Stefano's colouration methods as inventive and looking for new results, still being rooted in the tradition.

As regards the taste. 2nd batch was tasting differently from the 3rd batch due to the massive changes in the protocol of the production. As I was saying, every review is here and now and we should not compare 2nd to 3rd as in fact they are different from each other. It is like giving Pontarlier recipe to 3 Artists, each of them will make his own and they will be different, albeit sharing some common characteristics.


QUOTE(Absomphe @ Aug 27 2009, 07:35 AM) *

QUOTE(absinthist @ Aug 26 2009, 02:07 PM) *

The veronica has its say and it is good to hear her trying to be louder than wormwood.


As long as it doesn't come close to succeeding.

It does not. It has been moved aback strongly when compared to 2nd and definitely to the 1st batch.

Posted by: Kirk Aug 27 2009, 09:25 PM

Absinthe should be green in my opinion, but the truth is, it doesn't matter beyond the fact that it may be indicative of certain techniques, still it does not matter at all, (i.m.o.) you don't color it to make it green, you color it to impart certain flavors.
I've been growing and processing veronica for years and I still don't know what it tastes like, some say it adds texture, I can't agree with that because I haven't seen it, some say it's good for color, maybe I can agree. Others say it has an effect on you. People I trust say it has a lot of chlorophyll, maybe so.
Why would anyone recommend using badiane though?

Posted by: Green Baron Aug 27 2009, 10:24 PM

Certainly not to obtain a thick louche if one does not have the protocol for distilling to get good louche action with just anise and fennel as the sole anethole sources.

Sorry Boggy, but I happen to be a badiane recipe doubter. I know it was used back in the day, but I still don't know if I'd trust a text for one of the premium marques that calls for it.

Personally, if not much is used and I can't detect it in flavor or body and it doesn't louche too quick, it's not a big deal IMO. But still, for a true purist superieure/suisse absinthe (and a display of distillation skill), I think it should not be used.

Posted by: Kirk Aug 27 2009, 10:33 PM

It's considered to be a way of cutting corners or making up for a problem with your protocols.
Badiane is stronger and much cheaper to use than green anise, more readily available and produces certain results. Badiane is profane to absinthe.

Posted by: Green Baron Aug 27 2009, 10:53 PM

Aside from the availability thing, I've heard that raw star anise is actually more expensive than green anise, but to get a good louche using the green requires more skill.

I've also heard that star anise was used historically in pre-ban absinthe, but not in the real good stuff.


Posted by: Kirk Aug 27 2009, 11:08 PM

I'm thinking it's cheaper to use because you use less of it and it's an almost fool proof louche.
My impression was that historically, when it was used, it was used for those reasons, and frowned upon for the harsh taste. Considered to be a way of cutting corners.

Posted by: Patlow Aug 28 2009, 12:16 AM

Which anise does V.C. use? I could look at the bottle, but it's all the way across the room.

Posted by: Absomphe Aug 28 2009, 01:13 AM

Both green and star.

Posted by: Green Baron Aug 28 2009, 02:16 AM

How bout purple and square?

Posted by: martin.zufanek Aug 28 2009, 07:06 AM

According to badiane, I have added just very little of it, it's grams only! And badiane is circa 3 times more expensive than green anise here in Czech republic.
As far as I know, badiane was used in Cusenier recipe and its widely used in todays absinthes.

Posted by: Green Baron Aug 28 2009, 07:43 AM

Well, regardless, the videos of batch 3 look really good to me Martin, especially the first one with good lighting and a moderate drip.

Posted by: absinthist Aug 28 2009, 07:55 AM

QUOTE(Kirk @ Aug 27 2009, 01:25 PM) *

you color it to impart certain flavors.

Exactly.


QUOTE(martin.zufanek @ Aug 27 2009, 11:06 PM) *

And badiane is circa 3 times more expensive than green anise here in Czech republic.

Same as in here, 30g of badiane of good quality costs as much as 80g of green anise of exceptional quality; low quality green anise is relatively cheap, cheaper than star anise but provides a wet taste and is barely used.

Posted by: Patlow Aug 28 2009, 02:14 PM

Thanks Abs…

Posted by: dakini_painter Aug 28 2009, 11:38 PM

I suspect the Swiss clandestine distillers began using badiane more than green anise after the ban as the constable might have raised his eyebrows when he discovered you with 600 kilos of green anise.

"Benoît, I know you are my friend, but surely you don't think I believe you are going to bake so many Chräbeli? After all, it's August and the wormwood is in full flower." evill.gif

Posted by: Bruno Rygseck Aug 29 2009, 08:08 PM

Nah, the http://www.swisster.ch/en/news/distiller-creates-brew-in-honor-of-barack-obama_176-1069205 would have been distilling absinthe himself, too…

But on the subject matter, Martin: the videos are great. I look forward to trying out St. Antoine myself.

Posted by: mthuilli Aug 30 2009, 08:02 PM

QUOTE(martin.zufanek @ Aug 28 2009, 08:06 AM) *

As far as I know, badiane was used in Cusenier recipe and its widely used in todays absinthes.

And there is nothing wrong with it Martin, badiane is an excellent addition, as long as it doesn't replace green anise. I love a little of badiane in my absinthe.

Posted by: EdouardPerneau Aug 31 2009, 01:36 AM

this is from 1817


IPB Image

those from late 1800's I can't remember exactly

IPB Image

IPB Image


so where I wanna go with this …badiane was a common ingredient … perhaps the anti-badiane league starts at the same time that the governement start to think to ban so the main idea was to get their products more healtier they could

Posted by: Conte d'Ugenta Sep 1 2009, 03:40 PM

I personally dislike star anise, and would probably like the Antoine a little better without it, BUT from an objective point of view the use of badiane in Antoine is flawless, it doesn't overpower the green anise and just complete it. The third batch really tastes like absinthe and really tastes good, great louche, mouthfeel, with a very herbal still fresh taste.
And the distillery location in Borsice, just a piece of heaven!

Posted by: OCvertDe Sep 1 2009, 08:46 PM

You guys are killin' me.

Posted by: Provenance Sep 1 2009, 08:55 PM

And yet you still post. Obviously they haven't been thorough enough in their work.

Posted by: OCvertDe Sep 3 2009, 12:06 PM

Hacks, the lot of them.

ON the other hand, I'm coming to believe it's more about the bleeding out than the killing, here at FV…

Posted by: dakini_painter Sep 3 2009, 12:41 PM

Blood is necessary for life, you know. evill.gif

Posted by: Absomphe Sep 3 2009, 03:19 PM

Indeed!


Paging Dr. O… evill.gif


Just kidding.

Really.

Posted by: Seth Sep 6 2009, 06:47 AM

Hey… Can you send a sample to Brazil?????

Posted by: Green Baron Sep 11 2009, 08:42 AM

QUOTE(EdouardPerneau @ Aug 30 2009, 06:36 PM) *

this is from 1817


IPB Image

those from late 1800's I can't remember exactly

IPB Image

IPB Image


so where I wanna go with this …badiane was a common ingredient … perhaps the anti-badiane league starts at the same time that the governement start to think to ban so the main idea was to get their products more healtier they could


Ed (and anyone else with a perspective), I'm curious- and I ask this question without sarcasm- what leads you to believe the references you quoted are more reliable/authoritative as to the use of badiane in Suisse/superieure than those that exclude it?

Of course I'm no great absinthe researcher, but neither Brevans, Duplais, or Bedel call for badiane for superieure, and only call for it in lesser grades such as the various ordinare and fine classes.

Age of the document alone doesn't seem to be the best indicator of accuracy- I'm sure you're aware of example of an http://www.louchedlounge.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=5521 that calls for cherry leaves and oil of anise (among other things), which we know is incorrect.

If there was an anti-badiane movement as you suggest (evidence that indicates this?) that motivated Bedel et. al. to exclude it from the superieures, why did they include it in the other distilled types?

Additionally, wouldn't recipes for specific marques be somewhat suspect depending on the source? Maybe this isn't the best analogy, but there's been reasonable guesses about the Coca Cola secret recipe, but are they 100% accurate? If cola was banned tomorrow, and many producers hoped to be back making their stuff at some point after the Great War ended (which everyone in 1914 thought would be over by Christmas), I feel like they wouldn't really feel compelled to say "game over" and spill their secrets.

Just stuff that got me thinkin'.

Posted by: EdouardPerneau Sep 11 2009, 08:17 PM



what leads you to believe the references you quoted are more reliable/authoritative as to the use of badiane in Suisse/superieure than those that exclude it?
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yes and no I only quote few there about 20 document that take the almost the same recipe and chande an ingredient or two , the ratio


I meaned that early recipe contains but was retired later because it was belived to be toxic and inferior… Since most here knows that 90% of the modern swiss bleue recipe (that have evoluated from the pre-ban recipe) contains some

Of course I'm no great absinthe researcher, but neither Brevans, Duplais, or Bedel call for badiane for superieure, and only call for it in lesser grades such as the various ordinare and fine classes.


Age of the document alone doesn't seem to be the best indicator of accuracy-
With those stuff I wanted to pin down the before 1820's of absinthe

I'm sure you're aware of example of an http://www.louchedlounge.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=5521 that calls for cherry leaves and oil of anise (among other things), which we know is incorrect.

I wasn't aware before but I can see something the recipe is in english and we had good example of translating recipe here that they change elecamphane to be black alder … perhaps an translation mistake

If there was an anti-badiane movement as you suggest (evidence that indicates this?
Absinthe Bourgeois Label that is stated Garantie sans badiane ) that motivated Bedel et. al. to exclude it from the superieures, why did they include it in the other distilled types?

I would say since bourgeois is an well known Pontarlier producer that might have and influence and since they were scientist perhaps because of the little methanol the distilled badiane produces


Additionally, wouldn't recipes for specific marques be somewhat suspect depending on the source?
Could be , as duvallon stated on his blog there is always something missing in old recipe …I also think that duplais ,brevans etc where made for those that were already distiller so they could pin down the wrong part but the unskilled distiller can't



Just stuff that got me thinkin' that is what I wanted to do w00t2.gif


Posted by: Absinthia Sep 22 2009, 06:27 PM

Absinthe St. Antoine 3rd batch

Reviewed by Absinthia 09/22/2009
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Absinthia scores Absinthe St. Antoine 3rd batch 82 out of 100



Editor's note: Review merged into main review post above

Posted by: mthuilli Sep 22 2009, 09:47 PM

I'm just tasting my first glass of batch #3 right now and I can say it's damn good! Great improvement from batch 1 & 2.

I'll write a more detailed review later but for now:
The veronica profile is still there (mainly in the aroma before water) but is now well balanced with green+star anise and a nice fenel in the background. But the main flavor is now a savory A.a., what a surpise! It makes me think of nicely-flavored-Blanchette.

This is really a great absinthe we have from the Czech Republic, Martin can now start to teach others in his country how a 'real' absinthe should taste. Congrats Martin, you have it!

Note: it is a little bit too tongue numbing Martin, I would slightly decrease the star anise quantity in benefit of the fenel. The rest is perfect, specially the A.a..

Posted by: Artemis Sep 22 2009, 11:16 PM

QUOTE
I'm sure you're aware of example of an http://www.louchedlounge.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=5521 that calls for cherry leaves and oil of anise (among other things), which we know is incorrect.

I wasn't aware before but I can see something the recipe is in english and we had good example of translating recipe here that they change elecamphane to be black alder … perhaps an translation mistake


There is an English translation of Duplais (actually published in English back in the day) that contains (as does the original French version) a recipe for absinthe of Nimes. Whoever translated it turned "racines d'aunée" into "black alder". No doubt that mistake was repeated through the years by people who read that work, or maybe others made the same mistake in translation. Aunée is not black alder; it is elecampane (Inula helenium). My translation of Duplais at Oxy's website has it correctly.


Posted by: Artemis Sep 22 2009, 11:20 PM

Racines is roots - black alder is a tree that is 60 feet tall at full maturity. Who's going to kill a 60-foot tree to make liquor? If you think absinthe is expensive NOW .............

Posted by: eric Sep 23 2009, 03:21 PM

It is interesting to note that the 1893 English translation of J. De Brevans has the same "Roots Black Alder" mistake on page 103 for the Absinthe of Nîmes recipe.
However, it correctly translates Elecampane as Anuée on page 57 in the Table of Principle Essences.




Posted by: Green Baron Oct 7 2009, 09:20 AM

Ok HERE'S what I was looking for. Oxy articulated what you were talking about Ed. Hmm, interesting. As a matter of personal taste, I still generally like my absinthe better without it though.

QUOTE(Oxygenee @ Sep 2 2008, 08:58 PM) *

Talking of star anise though, the more I study early recipes, the more I'm struck by how a-historical our modern condemnation of star anise is. Most eighteenth century absinthe "precursor" recipes have star anise (often instead of, not just as well as, green anise). So do most pre-Duplais absinthe recipes from the first half of the nineteenth century. In other words, it's a traditional and time honoured ingredient, and can be an entirely legitimate component of historically informed absinthe.

In the late 19th century, some manufacturers - Absinthe Bourgeois among them - actively denigrated star anise, but not on grounds of taste - rather because it was believed, on account of its woody character, to result in possible methanol contamination of the distillation, and so be undesirable on health grounds. There's no actual evidence that this is (or was) true, and it's just as likely to be simply a marketing gimmick that with time has become enshrined as fact.


Posted by: Kirk Oct 16 2009, 03:47 AM

Star anise is a rent seeking way of cheating by a
bunch of rent seeking assholes

Posted by: absinthist Jan 19 2010, 11:18 AM

St. Antoine #4

Reviewed by absinthist 1/19/2010
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absinthist scores St. Antoine #4 93 out of 100

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Editor's note: Review merged into main review post above

Posted by: OCvertDe Jan 20 2010, 12:33 PM

I'm really wishing my sample of batch 2 hadn't been lost in the mail now.

Posted by: Marc Jan 20 2010, 05:23 PM

Batch 1 & 2 had nothing to do with 3 and 4, so don't worry.

Posted by: Tibro Jan 20 2010, 06:09 PM

Well, kind of like getting the motors warmed up before making the jump to hyper-space. A quantum leap happened in the learning curve.

Posted by: absinthist Jan 20 2010, 07:43 PM

QUOTE(Marc @ Jan 20 2010, 09:23 AM) *

Batch 1 & 2 had nothing to do with 3 and 4, so don't worry.

Indeed!™ The waiting is worth the product or vice versa. Ergo…

Posted by: OCvertDe Jan 20 2010, 11:34 PM

QUOTE(Marc @ Jan 20 2010, 12:23 PM) *
Batch 1 & 2 had nothing to do with 3 and 4, so don't worry.


Well, apparently missing out on batch 2 got me stricken from the sample list, so…

Posted by: G&C Jan 21 2010, 02:49 AM

Want some cheese with that?

Posted by: OCvertDe Jan 21 2010, 12:10 PM

I likes me a nice block of cheese.

Posted by: Absomphe Jan 21 2010, 01:14 PM

News flash.

Posted by: OCvertDe Jan 21 2010, 08:06 PM

Not really, but ok.

Posted by: hartsmar Aug 16 2011, 08:22 PM

Updated... WOWSAH!

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