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> Cachaça made in USA like in Brazil, ---- cachaça you can make "caipirinha" ----
mgs
post Apr 5 2010, 10:04 PM
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There is a US made cachaça of very good quality, Leblon, the name of a famous beach in Rio de Janeiro…. Look at the link here Leblon - Cachaça



saúde !

- Marcelo groupwave reversed.gif
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Shabba53
post Apr 6 2010, 07:08 PM
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QUOTE(mgs @ Apr 5 2010, 06:04 PM) *

There is a US made cachaça

Nope. Made in Brazil.
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Shabba53
post Apr 22 2010, 02:36 PM
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Looks like we can park the cachaça discussion here, since there's already a thread for it.

So, Marcelo, what are your favorite brands?

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Artemis
post Apr 22 2010, 07:50 PM
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Sugar cane is good. Cane sugar is good. I had never heard of this stuff before Marcelo brought it up.

It seems like it might be a bottle of headache (congeners). Is it better or worse or the same as rum in that respect?


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Shabba53
post Apr 22 2010, 08:37 PM
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My experience is that it's been about the same, but it really depends on the quality as well.
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Jaded Prole
post Apr 22 2010, 11:12 PM
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I prefer dark rums.


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Artemis
post Apr 22 2010, 11:26 PM
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So did I, but there's something appealing about the cachaça. I used to never get a headache from absinthe.


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Shabba53
post Apr 23 2010, 01:06 AM
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QUOTE(Jaded Prole @ Apr 22 2010, 07:12 PM) *

I prefer dark rums.

As do I, but dark rum definitely doesn't work very well in a caiparinha.
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mgs
post Apr 23 2010, 01:53 AM
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Hello Friends :

you know why you prefer dark rums ? Because the cachaça that comes to US (and also in France) is :shit: (hope this works).

They are different…. I also like dark rums…. but they are different.

In Brazil most of the industrialized brands are really not amazing to be frank, and only those come to US or to Europe. So you can probably find brands like 51, Pirassununga, Ypioca, or maybe Velho Barreiro. All of those boozes in Brazil are CHEAP cachaça, and the only one from this list that I can still accept is the Ypioca - Import, which has layers of thin wood around the bottle…

In Brazil the good cachaça is actually purchased directly on distilleries or from bars (restaurants) that buy in bulk and sell for customers who are friends.

Most of the good cachaça is made only in the states of São Paulo and Minas Gerais. Although I am from São Paulo, I have to admit that the cachaça from Minas Gerais is WAY BETTER…. so if you go to Brazil, or if someone who you know is coming from Brazil as for a "cachaça mineira" (which means that is made in the state of Minas Gerais).

There are basically two types : the clear, and the dark. The clear is best for caipirinha, because it does not add any extra flavor, only the sugar cane. The dark one is supposed to be aged and matured in oak barrels, and it has a taste towards of a thin brandy. That is good to drink straight, no caipirinha with the dark cachaça.

When I was in College I used to travel to cities outside São Paulo with my big old car during the weekends to buy gallons and gallons of cachaça in distilleries, and I used to resell that to the local bars (pubs) close to my university….. It was a way for me to make some money as a student….. and it was fun, because I visited very small cities with wonderful distilleries.

So the reality is this : GOOD cachaça is made by small distributors in Brazil (and we have thousands)…. the industrialized cachaça is really not good quality, and I never found good cachaça anywhere that I lived in US or in France.

and the best cachaça that I drank EVER in my life is this one

Cachaça with quality of a whisky

unfortunately the link above is in Portuguese. But, this cachaça is made by the Agricultural School of the University of São Paulo in the city of Piracicaba. They have a small production, because they are a school, and not a business, but they got international prizes for this cachaça…. When I drink this one (I am fortunate to still have half a bottle in my house) it is better that a cognac for me…. I just drink straight, no ice…. it is so good that I will never make a caipirinha with this one….

even though people usually say that "cachaça is rum" … that is not true…. is like saying that cognac is armagnac….

Saúde !

- Marcelo

PS: and as you probably know, cars in Brazil are powered by Ethanol….. so our cars have a smell in the pipe tail : same as cachaça….. we even have some bumper stickers "Car and Driver Powered by Alcohol"




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Wild Bill Turkey
post Apr 23 2010, 03:51 AM
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QUOTE(mgs @ Apr 22 2010, 06:53 PM) *

even though people usually say that "cachaça is rum" … that is not true…. is like saying that cognac is armagnac….

I'd have to disagree and say that I think of cachaça as a regional style of rum, and as such the analogy is more like saying armagnac is a variety of cognac, which is also not quite correct, but isn't far off. The definitions I've read about why cachaça and rhum agricole aren't essentially the same never seemed very clear to me.

I work in a rum bar, and we serve the Ypioca, as well as Sagatiba, both the velha and the white pura. The white Sagatiba makes a very flavorful caipirinha, and the velha gets used in a wide variety of drinks which call for gold agricoles. I think the Sagatiba velha is delicious. I don't know where in Brazil it is distilled. Have you tried it?
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mgs
post Apr 23 2010, 05:20 AM
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Well….. of course I don't consider myself an expert in drinks and beverages, and maybe a cachaça can be considered as a regional rum as you say….. but it tastes completely different. This past Saturday I ordered a caipirinha in a jazz bar in Denver, it was made of rum, and I hated it….

I can drink a rum, as a rum… but when I drink cachaça straight, the end of the taste should remind me sugar cane…. anyway….. I also don't think that a 0.5% milk is milk, even though it is considered milk…. ;-)

I heard of Sagatiba, but never tried. I saw in the free shop when I left São Paulo last January…. but in the free shop a bottle of cachaça is 40 - 50 dollars, while in Brazil we can buy that for less than 10 dollars, so I usually do not buy cachaça in duty free shops.

I searched on the Internet about Sagatiba, there is a good website in English
sagatiba webpage

I looked for the address there and did not find… I searched on LinkedIN and they have a profile, and the address for the "headquarters" is Av. Brig. Faria Lima, 1485, torre norte, 10o andar. São Paulo, SP.

Sp, I suspect that if the business headquarters is in the city of São Paulo, the distillery must be somewhere in the state of São Paulo. São Paulo has sugar cane everywhere because of the alcohol production for cars, and usually the distilleries are in small cities in the interior of the state…

cheers,

- Marcelo
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Tibro
post Apr 23 2010, 05:46 AM
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QUOTE(Artemis @ Apr 22 2010, 09:50 PM) *

I had never heard of this stuff

Doing a quick search I came across a topic line that referred to it as well known among yuppies and lushes.

QUOTE(Wild Bill Turkey @ Apr 23 2010, 05:51 AM) *
The definitions I've read about why cachaça and rhum agricole aren't essentially the same never seemed very clear to me.

After a brief look I didn't come up with anything substantial but I'm inclined to believe that there are probably significant differences in how the mashes are handled for each of these. I'm guessing, but that would make the most sense to me. It may be just a dunderheaded way of looking at it though, I don't know.


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absinthist
post Apr 23 2010, 07:06 AM
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These are available in Poland, which ones are the most worth buying, Marcelo:

http://www.sklep-ballantines.pl/sklep/inde…e,id_gr,48.html

The names: 51, Optimum, Canario and Pitu. I have not had none of each, so please enlighten on the very subject.


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mgs
post Apr 23 2010, 07:06 AM
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now you made me curious…… I always considered that the taste of both cachaça vs. rum are different but never bothered why…. but since there are so many "Booze Ph.D.s" here I decided to look a little bit at least over the internet on Portuguese (Brazilian) sites….

so…. someone wrote in a brazilian discussion list that :

A cachaça é feita a partir do caldo da cana fermentado e destilado.
O rum é feito do melaço da cana: o caldo é fervido até engrossar e só então é fermentado e destilado.
Em síntese, um é feito de cana crua; o outro de cana cozida…


which means that the cachaça is made of the juice of sugar cane that was fermented and distilled (pretty much like alcohol for cars, since I have seen this process for cars).

then the person says that the rum is made of the "melaço" of sugar cane, the juice is brought to boiling point until it thickens and then it is fermented and distilled…

so the conclusion there is that the cachaça is made of raw sugar cane and the rum is made of cooked sugar cane…

now my own observation : when the cachaça is GOOD it smells like sugar cane plantation, and it also smells like cars in Brazil…. and has a similar smell of raw sugar when it cames out of the sugar plant…..

but, rum smells like rum…. (gosh this could be a thesis)

a bientôt….

- Marcelo

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mgs
post Apr 23 2010, 07:20 AM
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QUOTE(absinthist @ Apr 23 2010, 01:06 AM) *

These are available in Poland, which ones are the most worth buying, Marcelo:
http://www.sklep-ballantines.pl/sklep/inde…e,id_gr,48.html


51 is the most popular cachaça in Brazil, because it is the most cheap with still some quality, but I don't like it. There are many jokes about 51, about being bad, about being cheap, about being available for poor and rich…… I particularlly don't drink 51 straight… it can be used for caipirinhas in big parties when you don't want to expend money in better cachaça…

51 sponsors soccer games, and everyone sees "51" on TV screens in Brazil…. in addition they use beautiful women in their advertisements….

Pitu is better, for sure, not the best cachaça that you can find in Brazil, but I like it better than 51. If you find Pitu or Ypioca they are about the same quality.

Optimum and Canario I don't know… never heard of them… so I cannot make a judgement…

Because caipirinha is sweet, we can easily get drunk……. but a good cachaça is the one that does nbot give you headache with a reasonable drinking (of course if you get a whole bottle, and I already had a bottle in my life a few times, next day is an Advil day..).

I remember I used to go to the ocean with a boat to fish with my father, uncle and cousins… we stayed the whole night fishing and drinking cachaça….. telling bad jokes…….talking about soccer and women…. and sometimes catching a fish…..

- Marcelo



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