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> origins of the formula
Artemis
post Mar 29 2015, 06:15 PM
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Neither talent nor behavior

Below we reproduce verbatim large excerpts from these two documents, respecting the spelling and syntax of the author.

"You doubtlessly recall that one Pierre Ordinayre from Quingey, so-called Master of Surgery and Medicine, presented a request to the Council to obtain permission to exercise his profession in the Val de Travers, to be allocated a pension to get started and that he would be able to produce his certifications to the Commune of Couvet where he makes his residence, this request having been deliberated on the 11th of this month, the Council granted him permission to practice Medicine and Surgery in the Val de Travers, so long as he behaved himself and no drawback was found ...

I take the liberty of representing that the aforementioned Ordinaire has neither the talent nor the behavior required to merit the favor that they in truth conditionally granted, this man, knowing that the Commune of Couvet sought a person who knew Surgery and a bit of Medicine, came and presented himself, bragging about knowing the one and the other, asking simply for lodging or two Louis (currency) and promising to produce valid certifications to prove that he has completed his course of study and taken his exams at Besançon.

... whom they accepted in the capacity of surgeon but on the condition that he in due course produce the certifications that he offered to obtain and show, and finally, that he submit to an exam under the eyes of the King's Physician ...

... however he has satisfied neither the one nor the other of these considerations and two months have passed without Pierre Ordinaire taking even the smallest step toward these ends.

...well understand that not only has he not produced the certificates for which he was asked and claimed that he was not in a condition to undergo an exam, he presented on October 11th the request of which I have spoken above, which contains plenty of random facts

... the Commune notified the aforementioned Ordinarye, finally, telling him that if he would also take the examination he could stay in town, to which Ordinaire responded that he had already done so at Neufchatel and there was nothing else he could do; obviously, he did not do so, but it was Mr. Delechaux who went there ...

... on the other hand I understand that Pierre Ordinaire, who threw a party in the community and drank bottles of wine left and right, thinks he is anchored here, and imagines himself too important for me to find it inconvenient that he stays here ...

I have the honor of praying that the Council authorizes me to tell Pierre Ordinaire that he is forbidden to practice Medicine or Surgery in the jurisdiction of the Val de Travers, and that if he were to go away, it would be for the great good of these quarters

at the start of his residence in Couvet, not carrying any certification, but a declaration that his brother appeared before a notary in Pontarlier, to affirm that his brother (Pierre), who is from Couvet, took a course in anatomy at Besançon, under a Mr. Jussy, and worked under him allegedly for three years ...

declaration contrary to any truth, that they knew of him previously, because he served for eight years with the Regiment of Metz just before he came to Chaudefond in 1767 ...

that I received a letter from the Chief of Staff of the Regiment of Metz of the Royal artillery corps garrisoned at Auxonne, by which I am informed that Pierre Ordinaire deserted on June 20th, 1767, tarrying at Couvet, he asked me to take the uniform of the regiment which he had on his body and send it to him via the channel of Subdelegate Mr. Blondeau, and that is exactly what I did

it is because expelling Ordinayre, he would be greatly afraid of his (Ordinaire's) supporters who are 19/20ths of the Commune, among whom are a number of hotheads, and others whom he had in mind certain people thoughtlessly zealous about Delechaux, who would be driven to acts of violence and excess against the latter ...

the sort that they do not know, as it appears to me, nothing better to do to parry inconveniences and prevent disorders, than to allow to subsist the permissions that the Government granted to both Delechaux and Ordinayre to practice their occupations in the country"



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Il arrive souvent que les personnes couvertes d’esprit enflamme courent en appelant du secours.
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Artemis
post Mar 29 2015, 06:20 PM
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Doctor or Not? Deserter or Not?

Another document, an undated letter, signed by ten notables of the village, is addressed to the Council of State. The signatories explain the situation in the village, which cruelly lacks a doctor because of the departure of Mr. Deleschaux and, "in view of the fears of their spouses in losing the subject of an ability which is generally recognized", solicits the authority to give the approval to practice to Pierre Ordinaire.

This request was formulated during January 1769 or the beginning of February. We may deduce this from the decision of the Council of State of 15 February 1769, when it was announced that the request of the suppliants would be examined after the chatelaine of Val de Travers had made his inquiry to determine if it was true that Pierre Ordinaire was a deserter from France.

In the space of some eight months, from November 1768 to June 1769, the Council of State dealt with the case of Pierre Ordinaire in ten sessions, which gives us an idea of the importance accorded to the affair. The references which are made in the books of that authority however do not give us the certainty that we might expect and are even sometimes contradictory, in particular the question of the exam taken, or not, by Pierre Ordinaire as to his ability as a doctor before the royal physician at Neuchâtel.

March 20th, 1769, after having received the second report from the chatelaine about which we have spoken, the Council of State announced, "concerning opinions that the Government received that the named Pierre Ordinaire, so-called surgeon living in Couvet, is a deserter from the Regiment of Metz, Royal Artillery Corps of France, it ordered that Mr. Martinet, Council of State, Captain and Chatelaine of the Val de Travers, give him (Ordinaire) to understand that he must depart this State within fourteen days of the day he is notified, and if he fails to comply, he will be found and punished as fitting."


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Il arrive souvent que les personnes couvertes d’esprit enflamme courent en appelant du secours.
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Artemis
post Mar 29 2015, 06:25 PM
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Expulsion Delayed

The communities of Couvet, Môtiers, Boveresse, Fleurier and St-Sulpice asked the Council of State to postpone his decision to evict Pierre Ordinaire, in view of the trust he had acquired from these communities and the unselfish care that he lavished upon the sick. The Council of State did not appreciate this step at all, and let them know it. However, he suspended his order of expulsion until the end of April.

Finally, in June 1769, it was Captain Francois Petitpierre, proprietor of the Black Eagle Hotel, future father in law of Pierre Ordinaire, who intervened with the Council of State. He presented documents attesting that the King of France had granted his pardon to Pierre Ordinaire for deserting from his armies, that the sum of 400 French livres - the price of this royal pardon - had been paid by Francois Petitpierre. The order of expulsion was then retracted and Pierre Ordinaire was authorized to remain in the country as long as he behaved himself.

What to make of this new information? The reports of the chatelaine Martinet are, without doubt, the reflection of information such as he received. Difficult to imagine that he led the Council of State astray with false reports. The details relative to the enlistment of Pierre Ordinaire with the Regiment of Royal Artillery of Metz, stationed at Auxonne, communicated to him by the chief of that regiment, are that the gunner Ordinaire had served eight years before deserting. We can even wonder about this desertion.

Gunner or Surgeon?

In truth, the period of enlistment for this French military unit was eight years, and we can well imagine that Pierre Ordinaire did not have the urge to reenlist, leaving the army without notice or without respecting the rules, scramming "English style" in his uniform. This departure could well qualify as desertion in the eyes of the general staff.

Eight years in the army as a gunner, did it provide the possibility of following the training of a doctor and/or campaign surgeon? It's not impossible, but unlikely. Pierre Ordinaire would not have had to evoke the anatomy course under Dr. Jussy that he took during three years in Besançon and he would have had no fear of passing a competence exam in Neuchâtel.

Uncertainly abides, however, as to his titles and qualifications as doctor-surgeon.
On the one hand, he appears to have been appreciated for his competence by a part of the population; on the other, the Council of State, through the mention it makes of the case in its books, is not at all clear on the exam of Dr. Dublé, king's physician, and Dr. Perrelet on the true competency of Pierre Ordinaire. Uncertainty still reigns as to the examination itself. Of what did it really consist? In a simple presentation of his letters of training and practice, as indicated in the minutes of the community assembly of September 8th, 1768, or something else?


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Il arrive souvent que les personnes couvertes d’esprit enflamme courent en appelant du secours.
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Artemis
post Mar 29 2015, 06:27 PM
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Learning surgery at his house

We are completely justified in thinking that the examination consisted indeed only of the ability of the applicant to produce one or more documents attesting to his qualifications as doctor and surgeon, and that Pierre Ordinaire could present nothing more than an attestation of complaisance (medical certificate issued for non-genuine illness to oblige a patient) deposited by his brother with a notary in Pontarlier. From there the conflict with the Commune, the chatelaine of the Val de Travers and the Council of State.

Our thinking in this regard is reinforced by two attestations that Pierre Ordinaire made, on 30 December 1785 and 8 June 1786, before the notary Henriod at Couvet for the benefit of Francois and Jean Ordinaire.

These notary acts relate that Mr. Francois Ordinaire de Levier of Franche-Comté and district of Salins, made under him for two years a study of surgery at his home in Couvet, during which time he treated the sick and made with success a number of difficult cures, in a manner as to merit the approbation of Mr. Pierre Ordinaire, sworn surgeon, as well as that of the public.

Mr. Pierre Ordinaire, sworn surgeon of the town of Quingey in Franche-Comté, says and declares that Mr. Jean Ordinaire, surgeon of Refange, district of Salins in Franche-Comté, made under him for one year a study of botany as well as medicine and surgery, having during that time worked successfully, to the satisfaction of Pierre Ordinaire and other concerned persons, various difficult cures, such that, by his dedication, assiduity, and regularity of his morals, he merited all confidence and the best possible testimonial.


Faculty at Besançon never heard of him

In that way, Pierre Ordinaire managed to establish, with the help of parents, peers, or other acquaintances, an attestation from which he benefited through the intervention of his brother to practice in Couvet. Following the trail of research to Besançon did not allow the discovery of the slightest trace of apprenticeship or study with the faculty he would have followed. In any case, he did not follow the three-year long course of study of Bisontin professor Jacques Philippe Jussy.

Our conviction that Pierre Ordinaire did not receive academic training in medicine and surgery changes to certitude after having consulted the French military archives, preserved at Château de Vincennes, from which we got the following information:
Attached Image
The excerpt above is taken from the register of enlistment of soldiers composing the royal artillery corps garrisoned at Metz. It mentions Pierre Ordinaire, son of Nicolas and Suzanne born Fagnon, native of Quingey in Franche-Comté, who was born in 1742. According to his summary of particulars and date of assignment as gunner/bombardier 2nd class, February 19th, 1762, it was for six years. This last detail differs from the eight years mentioned by the chatelaine of Val de Travers in his report to the Council of State.

Born on September 11th, 1741, and not in 1742, Pierre Ordinaire was 20 years and five months old at the time of his enlistment in the army. The son of farmers or day laborers, we can hardly imagine that he had the opportunity to receive training in medicine and surgery before his entrance into the army. Having left the army, he went to live in Chaux-de Fonds, where his presence is already attested in November, 1767.

If he had received such training during his period of service to the King of France, he should certainly not have fallen back on the good will of his brother to obtain an attestation before a notary in Pontarlier to prove his qualifications, and the chief of the regiment at Metz would have mentioned, in his letter to the chatelaine of the Val de Travers, his status as a military doctor, not a gunner.


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Il arrive souvent que les personnes couvertes d’esprit enflamme courent en appelant du secours.
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Artemis
post Mar 29 2015, 06:36 PM
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Artemis talking:

That's all of it.
At the end of the piece are the words on a plaque that commemorated a 100-year celebration of Pernod, in 1905.
I'm pretty sure I've translated that before, or seen it in English. In any case, it's pretty much a short version of the standard legend, not worth repeating (again).

Following that is a comment by Duvallon to the effect that when Ordinaire first arrived in Couvet in 1768, advertisements for absinthe extract sold by apothecaries had already appeared, 12 years previously.


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Il arrive souvent que les personnes couvertes d’esprit enflamme courent en appelant du secours.
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L'Assommoir
post Mar 29 2015, 10:56 PM
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Nice Work as usual!
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Artemis
post Mar 30 2015, 10:06 PM
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Thanks.
Interesting that the French authors describe his desertion as exiting the army "English style". tongue.gif
In China, they refer to his type of doctor as a "mengu daifu" (Mongolian doctor).
People always fart in the general direction of their rivals.


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Il arrive souvent que les personnes couvertes d’esprit enflamme courent en appelant du secours.
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Jaded Prole
post Mar 30 2015, 11:27 PM
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QUOTE
the Commune of Couvet


I like the sound of that.


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A fine absinthe is the product of knowledge, craftsmanship, and talent. An exceptional absinthe is the product of those things plus obsession. Most absinthe is the product of marketing.
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Artemis
post Mar 30 2015, 11:33 PM
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Could be translated different ways, but I decided to take it literally, knowing little to nothing of the actual situation.


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L'Assommoir
post Mar 31 2015, 07:27 PM
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While the good Dr. might be called a quack, sometimes those herbalist got something right:

http://www.cnn.com/2015/03/31/health/anglo…mrsa/index.html
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Jaded Prole
post Apr 1 2015, 01:45 PM
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Very cool, thanks!


Interesting that in old Saxon, a healer was referred to as a "leech." The swamp bug probably got the name because like physicians, they drew blood. Today the honorific would more likely apply to financiers and bankers.


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Kirk
post Apr 2 2015, 03:49 AM
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The recipe has to go through years of testing before it can be approved by the fda, I wonder how many people are making it at home?


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delirium
post Apr 2 2015, 09:43 AM
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Wow. Thanks for the effort!


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Bruno Rygseck
post Apr 2 2015, 08:15 PM
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Thanks indeed. Where did Dr. O make his elixier -- did he have a portable still or was it distilled locally and where he got the ingredients -- that would be interesting to find out.



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Artemis
post Apr 3 2015, 03:00 PM
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Local ingredients. Edouard Perneau provided a link to a book published in 1790 that shows the formula was already well known.
http://www.museeabsinthe.com/forums/index....ost&p=74276
It wasn't necessarily distilled - that passage talks about infusion and the sun ...
But in any case, you don't need a big or sophisticated still to make absinthe - any pot still will do.
Ordinaire may have owned such, or had access to it in the village.


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