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> sharp by Gounod, wtf
delirium
post Jan 30 2013, 04:57 PM
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I'm trying to understand Raoul Ponchon's writing Five a'clock absinthe.

Where one finds the best absinthe
That of the sons of Pernod
Forget the rest! They’re like a sharp by Gounod:
mere illusion.


Anybody have any idea where this "sharp" refer to?

Musical term? ("Definition: To make a note higher in pitch, the symbol placed before a note to raise it one half step.")




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G&C
post Jan 30 2013, 05:26 PM
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I couldn't say, but I do like his "Funeral March of a Marionette".


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pierreverte
post Jan 30 2013, 09:15 PM
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Most likely referring to a musical cord and spelled incorrectly, should be:

un dièse: (Music) sharp; fa ~ G sharp

"Fi des autres" "Fi" is also a pun on Pernod 'Fils'
meaning ignore the other makers of absinthe…

Thus the phrase for the most part, is saying that other absinthes are an illusion/inferior to the 'real' absinthe, Pernod Fils, as a certain musical note in Gounod's music has a fleeting feeling of illusion…




Charles Gounod:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Gounod


How cool is that and good call G&C?!, Gounod wrote the Hitchcock TV theme tune:

"One of Gounod's short pieces for piano, "Funeral March of a Marionette", received a new and unexpected lease of life from 1955 when it was first used as the theme for the television series Alfred Hitchcock Presents. "


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Artemis
post Feb 1 2013, 02:25 AM
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It definitely means a sharp in musical terms (a note raised in pitch by half a step). Could be a chord as well, I guess.

De même un dièse est un leurre
Quand il est de Gounod

Literally it means "the same way a sharp is a decoy, when it comes from Gounod". Not sure why I translated it the way I did years ago, and no idea how a sharp is a decoy or an illusion when it comes to Gounod. It sounds like something Benoit Noel would write. Interesting and flagrant, but nigh impenetrable.


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delirium
post Feb 2 2013, 01:10 PM
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Well, maybe "a certain musical note in Gounod's music" does have a fleeting feeling of illusion… dunno :/ ..


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delirium
post Sep 28 2013, 09:25 AM
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There is also a reference to Bonivards, to which is commented:

"François de Bonivard was a 16th century Swiss patriot who was immortalized in a poem by Byron. The Prisoner of Chillon. Delacroix produced a painting of the same name. Almost certainly Ponchon is referring to the Swiss."

But there was no absinthe in 16th century? Absinthe at the home of Bonivards?


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Artemis
post Sep 28 2013, 04:17 PM
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He's just using home of the Bonivards as a reference to Switzerland, home of absinthe, probably for no other reason than it rhymes with boulevards.


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L'Assommoir
post Sep 28 2013, 07:13 PM
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Et n'allez pas comme un qui serait du Hanovre
Surtout me l'effraye

I think that may be a dig at the English royals, (House of Hanover) the reputations of George IV* and the young Prince Albert, Edward VII. … as crass uncouth playboys.

*(Georgy porgy… kissed the girls and made them cry)
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