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Artemis
post Aug 28 2014, 02:52 PM
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thegreenimp
post Aug 29 2014, 02:07 AM
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QUOTE(Artemis @ Aug 28 2014, 08:28 AM) *
Thanks for the reference. Sounds nasty. Maybe it was a way of making crapsinthe more drinkable. But that explanation introduces the question of how the extra anise was added when NOT from a separate anise liquor. Anise extract? I think most of us would agree that a well-made absinthe doesn't need extra anything but water, so obviously a lot of crapsinthe was being sold, and/or a lot of anise whores were running around Paris who didn't recognize good absinthe when it was in front of them.


From the 1944 Herbsaint Booklet:
Attached Image

My understanding was back in the day, Anisette was used to sweeten absinthe, instead of sugar. (It's also on the label of that surviving '34 Jung & Wulff Absinthe bottle

Also on the first Legendre Absinthe poster, the original Legendre Absinthe Frappé used Benedictine as a likely sweetening agent, before they printed the Anisette recipe. I don't really find the old Granny's Purse ever needed sweetening, but it must have had a following in old NOLA.

Legendre made this too:

Attached Image


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Artemis
post Aug 29 2014, 05:31 PM
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Okay, we already know that Herbsaint tasted better than most absinthe all by itself. It certainly was neither bitter nor had any flavor that needed covering up. But it still could be the case that there were products that needed such; maybe so much so that the practice grew from those and became general, habitual, even with better products. Maybe it was the same for sugar. And granite.


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Artemis
post Aug 29 2014, 05:35 PM
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QUOTE
'une bourgeoise' or 'une panachée' was an absinthe with extra anisette cordial

I always thought absinthe Bourgeois (the brand in the black cat posters) was either named for a family (it was my grandma's name), or it purported to be the absinthe of the common people. Now I wonder if it was extra anisey absinthe.


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L'Assommoir
post Aug 29 2014, 08:17 PM
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Allais is writing in 1885, and MCD and others have said that the slotted absinthe spoons did not come into popular use until the later 1880's.

So I imagine that dissolving a rock hard lump of sugar, cut from a loaf, on a regular spoon must have extra tedious.
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Artemis
post Aug 29 2014, 08:44 PM
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Excellent observation.


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thegreenimp
post Aug 30 2014, 12:20 AM
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I'd bet Absinthe and Anisette were more popular in old NOLA in a Frappé, since no photos have ever surfaced of sugar cubes and spoons being used in any bar photos back in the day. (The only old absinthe drinking image ever seen from old NOLA was that 1919 O. A. H. News Reel)

Plus Ojen was a popular Krewe drink for a longtime, probably why Marion Legendre made Anisette right after repeal.

'34 Jung & Wulff absinthe label: Attached Image


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Artemis
post Aug 30 2014, 01:12 AM
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It's more than likely to me that absinthe in New Orleans was so strictly a "French" thing (and not even a French descent thing, but a thing for people who had actually been in France between the time Allais wrote that text and WWI), and a short-lived thing, that it barely got any publicity in town (New Orleans was pretty well Americanized by then), much less outside of town, and that's why we can't find much of anything in writing about it, or photographs.
Degas lived in New Orleans for five months in 1872, but he never (as far as I know) painted any absinthe scenes there, and it's not because he didn't walk around looking at everything. He painted the cotton exchange.
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thegreenimp
post Aug 30 2014, 01:01 PM
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Marion Legendre mentions the Cotton Exchange in 1959:

Attached Image

Legendre may have kept the whole absinthe in NOLA thing alive by accident, when he decided to get into the booze business.
The other two New Orleans distillers that made absinthe long before Legendre got into the game, abandoned it by 1940-41.



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Artemis
post Aug 30 2014, 05:22 PM
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Early 19th century - that was before it became a thing even in France, with the spoons and fountains and trappings. Absynthe must have been more or less medicinal, at least in the same way as the original cocktails served in pharmacies were. The specific mention of the frappe (not the drip) goes toward confirming my suspicion the absinthe "scene" in New Orleans was something different than in France, except maybe for a brief time just before the ban.
And I have to question how much Legendre even knew about 1859 in 1959. There's a lot of urbanlegendary crap in New Orleans history as told by New Orleans residents, especially those with something to promote.


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thegreenimp
post Aug 30 2014, 07:57 PM
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J.M. Legendre had two stories, the pr one, and the real story. Both sort of overlapped in places, but an apt description from someone I know, who knew him, was "Raconteur".

Legendre probably found that old newspaper ad, (or William Wisdom did…) for the Absinthe Manufacturers Association, PR. Legendre, eventually took over as the frontman when Wulff, and Yochim, started fading out of the scene. (Ray and B.J. have a copy of that ad in their giant collection of absinthe stuff)

The Absinthe Frappé if legend is correct, originated in NOLA at that place with all the damn football helmets, probably because of the climate. It probably took off that way in NOLA simply because it was cold, and tasted good. Plus we tend to like iced drinks in this part of the world.


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Artemis
post Aug 30 2014, 09:41 PM
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Agreed.
It's too damned hot to wait for something.
It's the sort of place you want a drink COLD and NOW.


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