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The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > The Monkey Hole > Arts & Philosphical Sundries
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sepia5
I tried this (though out of place) within an existing thread on the general absinthe page, and got no responses, so i thought I'd pose the question here as well: for you literature buffs, what are you currently reading, and what recommendations can you make? I just finished The Stones of Summer, by Dow Mossman - a good coming of age novel that is unlike anything you've read before. I won't lie, you really have to wade through segments of the novel, but it's been quite some time since I've read something that has affected me so intensely. I'm now about half way through Go Tell It On The Mountain, by James Baldwin. I like Baldwin, and thus far this book is enjoyable, but I previously read Another Country, and, to this point, I'd recommend Another Country. Hope I get some good recommendations. Tonight I'm drunk on wonderfully crafted ales from Cleveland's Great Lakes Brewery, rather than the drink that made this site famous. Hope everyone is feeling as temporarily happy as I tonight!
I_B_Puffin
I'm usually reading non-fiction, my latest book is Brassey's Encylclopedia of Military History and Biography. As for fiction, my favorite fiction authors are Dostoevsky and Orwell.
LaMuseVerte
Fact of the Day: George Orwell's real name was Eric Blair.
Btw, love Dostoevsky too :)

Short list...

Horror:
H.P. Lovecraft short stories are excellent... many anthologies out there to choose from, some better than others: though all of his work is available online free.

Graphic Novels:
Sandman - Neil Gaiman (set of 10 trades)
Star Dust - Vess and Neil Gaiman
Ruse - 19th century-theme comic book series (contact for more info on obtaining them).

Fantasy:
Neverwhere - Neil Gaiman
American Gods - Neil Gaiman
Sovereign Stone: Well of Darkness - Tracy Hickman & Magaret Weis
Sovereign Stone: Erm... the second one - " " " " not as great as first
Sovereign Stone: Journey into the Void - " " " " not as great as first but better than second.
Dragonlance Legends (I'd start with Chronicles first though -
Legends is 3 book series, so is Chronicles).
The Gunslinger - Stephan King (I couldn't get into it as fast seeing as how I'm into more "high fantasy").
Dragonlance War of Souls - M. Weis, T. Hickman... 3 books (you might need Chronicles, Dragons of Summer Flame - which is 1 book, and Next Generation to understand it - which is 1 book as well).
Sword of Shanarra - I didn't love it, so I'm not even going to look for the authors name - some might though, so I'll list it.
Wheel of Time Book 1 - Robert Jordan, if you like the first book and the pace, you'll like the rest... I didn't like any of them, the pace was terrible... but I'm told this is a great series.

Fiction:
A Passage to India - E.M. Forster (descriptions of Chandrapore were beautiful, the use of symbolism was the best I've seen in a long time, and the story was realistic: very beautiful book and I recommend it).
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep - PKD, freakin' great. Mercerism all the way!!!
Madame Bovary - ermm.. Flaubert? Something about it turned me on. There were a lot of boring parts though. Listen.. don't read it... get the Chabrol video verson.
Justine - Lawrence Durrell, Alexandria Quartet
Bathazar - Lawrence Durrell, Alexandria Quartet
Clea - Lawrence Durrell, Alexandria Quartet
Mountolive - Lawrence Durrell, Alexandria Quartet | in my opinion only Justine and Bathazar were good... but depends on taste.
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller was great
A Clockwork Orange by Burgess if you can read the British slang... gets in the way of enjoying it at times, but easy to catch on.
Dune - Frank Herbert (none of the ones after it though)
Hudson book of fiction for some neat short stories
1984 - orwell (great)
Fahrenheit 451 - Bradbury (good story)
Faust (play) Goethe - seductive, devilish, and great.

Alex Quartet is filled with lovely poetic prose (highly detailed). The characters are unlikable to some... what matters most is the theme. Many people have mixed opinions on the set, but I think they are great! With the exception of Justine, I found the rest dragging somewhat... but the overall experience is beautiful.

Philosophy:
Aesthetics - Croce (non-english is better)
The Gay Science - Nie.
My personal favorite: Being and Nothingness - Sartre
walter kaufmann's work is the best: basic writings of existentialism, Existentialism from Dostoevsky to Sartre is fine for most popular writings in existentialism.

Psych:
Maps of the Mind - Charles Hampden-Turner
Abnormal Psych - Lauren B. Alloy 8th Ed (college book)
Abnorm psych and modern life by Coleman (college but better)

Metaphysics:
I will side with Israel Regardie and say 6th (I believe, it isn't in front of me) edition of The Golden Dawn.
I will say for new folks the.. erm... 13 steps or something to High Magick is an excellent read.
Greek Magical Papyri w/ demotic text - forget the author too, but this is a neat book if you are into it.
Practical Kabbalah (but not really for content - more for an intro... this book pissed me off, but people say it's nice, so I'll add it)
Meditation and Kabbalah by Aryeh Kaplan
Pomegranate by Regardie I believe was a must
Tree of Life by Regardie (I didn't like it one bit: better books out there so beware)

I had a great history book on origins of the quasi-mystical figure 'Hermes Trismegistus'... but can't remember the name. On the subject I have thousands of history books: I can't begin to name them all, but I have a digital copy of the Malleus Maleficarum if anyone is interested: nice translation.

Plenty of good Gnostic books out there *sighs* I don't know where to start to list them.

Not the type of books you read? LOL. I've got a ton over here... so if you need reviews or anything, tell me the name of a book and I'll tell you if I read it (love reading - which is why making a list is rather difficult to do).

Warning: Seduced by Moonlight is a horrible book with NO substance. If people were that shallow in horny... well just makes you want to bash your head against a brick wall. frusty.gif

Reading line up for me: Absinthe Sip of Seduction along with Dragons of a Fallen Sun (War of Souls book I), and then History in a Bottle by Conrad. After that? 'Prolly pick up one of Kallisti/Bookwhore's books on the 17-18th century erotica... those look interesting.
Maldoror
Just finishing Hemingway´s Sun Also Rises and a travel guide to Paris.

Earlier this month I read J.- K. Huysmans´ Parisian Sketches, B. Akunin´s The Winter Queen and
M. Ageyev´s Novel With Cocaine.

Recommendations?

A couple of books that I´ve read more than once; Charles Baudelaire: Paris Spleen, Umberto Eco: The Name of The Rose, J. - K. Huysmans: Against Nature,
Comte de Lautreamont: Maldoror, J. S. Le Fanu: In a Glass Darkly, H. P. Lovecraft: The Case of Charles Dexter Ward and Arthur Rimbaud: A Season in Hell.


sixela
The Crimson Petal and the White.

The Quincunx (and The Unburied).

Yes, I have a penchant for novels set in the Victorian age.

Isaac Asimov's "Nemesis", or better, "The Gods themselves" (saves you from getting dragged into the Robot or Foundation series wink.gif ).

"The Stone Bridal Bed" by Harry Mulisch (quite interesting even in English, though the Dutch version is miles ahead).


Alpha Soixante
QUOTE
Recommendations?


Since many of the books you've mentioned are Paris-related or French, I'd recommend:

Hemingway--A Moveable Feast
Henry Miller--Black Spring, Tropic of Cancer
Raymond Queneau--Zazie in the Metro
Louis Aragon--Paris Peasant
Philippe Soupault--Last Nights of Paris
Jacques Prevert--Paroles
anything by Apollinaire
George Orwell--Down and Out in Paris and London

Oh, and listen to some Serge Gainsbourg, while you're at it.
Gertz
Comte de Lautréamont: The Songs of Maldoror.

A really crazy book.
sepia5
QUOTE (Alpha Soixante @ Apr 22 2004, 05:10 AM)
QUOTE
Recommendations?


Since many of the books you've mentioned are Paris-related or French, I'd recommend:

Hemingway--A Moveable Feast

I'll second that first recommendation. Definitely read A Moveable Feast if you enjoyed the Sun Also Rises. I think I'm going to hit up a Farewell to Arms next.
Absomphe
Rereading some favorite authors of late:

Umberto Eco

Mark Helprin

Caleb Carr

Eric Maria Remarque

Elizabeth Hand

Shirley Jackson
Abnorman
QUOTE (LaMuseVerte @ Apr 22 2004, 12:34 AM)
A Clockwork Orange by Burgess if you can read the British slang... gets in the way of enjoying it at times, but easy to catch on.
A Clockwork Orange also used a lot of bastardized Russian: "horrorshow" for "khorosho" is just one example.

I've been reading Charles Bukowski's Run With The Hunted lately. It's an autobiographical anthology.

I love Thomas Pynchon, even though reading him can be rather daunting.

William Burroughs can be simultaneously funny and frightening.

William Lindsay Gresham's Nightmare Alley is the hardest-boiled noir you'll ever read. It was recently made into a graphic novel illustrated by Spain Rodriguez. And the film adaptation of it (made in 1947 with Tyrone Power) is worth seeing, IF you can find it.

I also enjoyed reading Turn Off Your Mind by Gary Lachman (who used to be in Blondie) which is about the 60s and the New Age and the influences both had on the other.

I need some CoffeeCup2.gif
turangalila
Alright, here’s a short list of things I enjoyed reading recently.

Apuleius' "The Golden Ass", if you can do classical Roman stuff, is immensely funny and wonderful.

Milton and Dante are both worth reading. I think that the Inferno is easier to get into than Paradise Lost.

Pascal's Pensées is lovely. Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion is also lovely.

Italo Calvino's "If on a winter's night a traveler" I could recommend wholeheartedly. This is one of the best novels I’ve read, ever.

Also, Conan Doyle's "Hound of the Baskervilles": although I wish I'd read some other Holmes first to know the characters, after going through them all, this is clearly the best of them. It's got a nice crumbling Victorian feeling, the same sort one gets from Poe's "Fall of the House of Usher".

What else. Um, David Carrasco's "City of Sacrifice", on Aztec religion, is absolutely outstanding and could probably be very enjoyable.

My girlfriend recommends Anna Karenina. I might recommend Rabelais' Gargantua and Pantagruel, or Richard Brautigan’s Trout Fishing in America.
Maldoror
QUOTE (Gertz @ Apr 22 2004, 05:43 AM)
Comte de Lautréamont: The Songs of Maldoror.

A really crazy book.

Yeah, I haven´t been the same since 1st reading about
10 years ago...


Billynorm: Have you read Lachman´s latest "The Dedalus
Book of the Occult"? I´ve been thinking of ordering it soon. Turn Off your Mind was interesting and well researched.

Have to read some more Hemingway in near future. I´ve only read "Whom the Bell Tolls" besides "Sun Also Rises".

deam
I'm reading "Hideous Absinthe: A History of the Devil in a Bottle" right now. It's quite an interesting read so far. The stories we all know and love are more detailed in this book than in most other absinthe books I've read. In fact, there are even stories in this book about people I'd never heard of that have something to do with absinthe history. Eg. Edvard Munch and August Strindberg. It seems to be a pretty complete history so far. Definitely worth picking up even though the book costs $40.
LaMuseVerte
Anyone read English Assasin, Confessor and the newer book by the same author? I was wondering if I should pick up the new book - I liked English Assasin (Daniel Silva was the name?), and Confessor was decent enough.

Perhaps I'm too much of a historian (which I didn't realize until I saw the myriad of fictional-takes on the actual events, societies and members found within the book), but the Divinci Code really bothered me. (Some folks I've met accepted the information they read in the Dvinci Code is true or "near true"; it became like a cult book, which pisses me off since it was entirely fiction). Again, as far as fiction books are concerned it's decent: but I hear half the fun of the book is "learning" about all these esoteric things mentioned: if you are looking to "learn", don't pick up the book. (As in that regard, reading the book was a waste of time and I found his looking-up.gif poop.gif descriptions putting me to sleep at certain parts during the novel).
Absomphe
" In fact, there are even stories in this book about people I'd never heard of that have something to do with absinthe history. Eg. Edvard Munch and August Strindberg."


Heeeeeliiiiuuummmmmmmm!!!!!!!!!!!!! abs-cheers.gif
Artemis
QUOTE
what are you currently reading,


A road map.

QUOTE
and what recommendations can you make?


Love in the Time of Cholera

just finished it.

I CAN'T recommend The Hill of Dreams (Machen). I've waited years to read that, finally found it, and am disappointed - still struggling just to finish it. It's like slogging through a briar patch.
Maldoror
I really loved Machen´s White People and Great God Pan. Haven´t read The Hill of Dreams. His books are really hard to find...
Artemis
Great God Pan is what captivated me about Machen. Since Hill of Dreams is said to be his masterwork, my expectations were high. I suspect it's autobiographical, the struggles of a young writer disgusted with the publishing business in England at the time. It's certainly not in the same vein as Pan. I found Dreams on the Internet in full - search and you'll find it. It's full of typos, though ........
Abnorman
QUOTE (Maldoror @ Apr 22 2004, 03:01 PM)
Billynorm: Have you read Lachman´s latest "The Dedalus Book of the Occult"? I´ve been thinking of ordering it soon. Turn Off your Mind was interesting and well researched.

I knew nothing of its existence. Who published it? Is it another Disinformation book?
Maldoror
QUOTE (Artemis @ Apr 22 2004, 03:15 PM)
Great God Pan is what captivated me about Machen. Since Hill of Dreams is said to be his masterwork, my expectations were high. I suspect it's autobiographical, the struggles of a young writer disgusted with the publishing business in England at the time. It's certainly not in the same vein as Pan. I found Dreams on the Internet in full - search and you'll find it. It's full of typos, though ........

Yeah, found it too! Thanks! abs-cheers.gif
Maldoror
QUOTE (Billynorm @ Apr 22 2004, 10:43 PM)
QUOTE (Maldoror @ Apr 22 2004, 03:01 PM)
Billynorm:  Have you read Lachman´s latest "The Dedalus Book of the Occult"?  I´ve been thinking of ordering it soon.  Turn Off your Mind was interesting and well researched.

I knew nothing of its existence. Who published it? Is it another Disinformation book?

It´s an english publisher Dedalus (www.dedalusbooks.com). You can get the book
from amazon.co.uk.
Gertz
QUOTE (turangalila @ Apr 22 2004, 07:46 PM)
Milton and Dante are both worth reading. I think that the Inferno is easier to get into than Paradise Lost.


I have read the Divine Comedy with some friends for a couple of years now. We've read it loud for each other. When we finished, we started all over again - this time outdoors, in a nearby park, acting it.

During the winter, however, we've mostly stayed indoors, recording it instead as a sort of radio drama.

The Green Hour
LMV:

I just read the Alexandria Quartet a couple of Months ago. To me, it's an Amazing series of Books.

Though all the Books pretty much cover the same period of time: There is a Plot twist in each Book, that completly changes ones perspective of the Story, and how one views each Character. Not an easy trick to pull off! I thought those Plot twists, and the "Poetic Prose" were fuckin' Brilliant.

The only book that dragged for me, was Mountolive. Btw, the right order for reading them is:

Justine
Balthazar
Mountolive
Clea

Currently, I'm reading another series of intertwined books, by a writer of the same Era as Durrell: Anais Nin.

"Cities of the Interior" is similar to the Quartet. She was a master of Poetic Prose also.. I'm just about done with "Ladders to Fire." But, still need to read "Children of the Albatross," "The Four Chambered Heart," and "A Spy in the House of Love."

It's kind o' cool, there was an Absinthe referance in Ladders to Fire:
" With this he drank fully from his Pernod, drank indeed as if the stream of absinthe, of ideas, feelings, talk, should pass and change every day guided only by his thirst."

I'm also reading a couple of non-fiction books:

"The SeShual Life of Catherine M." written by a French Art Critic. Her Story makes "Fear of Flying" sound like a Childrens book..

and I'm also reading: "Absinthe, a Myth Always Green" LARS!.gif


I just got my Copy in the Mail and I'm really enjoying it. Thank you Pierreverte and Artemis!

absintheglass-glow2.gif
deam
Absinthe: A Myth Always Green is a great read; I couldn't put it down. It would be cool if books could fist-fight: Absinthe: A Myth Always Green v. Absinthe: Sip of Seduction. I understand that, if you've read the 2, there's no contest; it'd just be fun to see.
LaMuseVerte
I would positively agree with the order - again, with the dragging I can understand, especually with Mountolive. I liked Justine tons, and I'd recommend it to anyone - even those who don't have an interest in reading all 4 books.

I'll check out Anais Nin, thanks. Finding such good books are difficult - at least with the style we both like (which we agree upon it seems). Again though, on a more basic level (so to speak) and yet still full of beautiful images I'd suggest A Passage to India by E.M. Forster.

QUOTE
I have read the Divine Comedy with some friends for a couple of years now. We've read it loud for each other. When we finished, we started all over again - this time outdoors, in a nearby park, acting it.


Wish I was hanging out with you guys.
Abnorman
QUOTE (deam @ Apr 24 2004, 01:37 AM)
Absinthe: A Myth Always Green is a great read; I couldn't put it down. It would be cool if books could fist-fight: Absinthe: A Myth Always Green v. Absinthe: Sip of Seduction. I understand that, if you've read the 2, there's no contest; it'd just be fun to see.

If it was a battle royale among the authors, editors, translators & contributors, I'm afraid Sip Of Seduction would win. It has a four to three advantage, and if you've ever seen photos of Ted Breaux & Artemis, you'd know who'd win that match up. And there's no love lost between Marie-Claude Delahaye (who's not an absintheuse) & Benoît Noël, from what I've been led to understand...
dangerousangels
In no particular order.
Francesca Lia Block: Ecstasia, Primavera, Dangerous Angels
William S. Burroughs: Anything.
Neil Gaiman: Anything (though American Gods can drag) I must say Neverwhere is incredible, and my favorite of his, stardust runs a close second.
Eduardo Galeano: Upside Down(listed as fiction, you can decide that for yourself though)
Manly P. Hall: Secret Teachings of All Ages(KICK ASS BOOK)
Anais Nin: Collages, Cities of the Interior, House of Incest
JG Ballard: ANYTHING. Just anything. Crystal World, Crash, Running Wild, the Atrocity Exhibition, Empire of the Sun.
D.H. Lawrence: The Man Who Died
Darcey Steinke: Suicide Blonde
Albert Hofmann: Plants of the Gods
William Gibson: anything, Burning Chrome is one of his best.
Nizami: Layla and Majnun(where Eric Clapton REALLY got the inspiration for the song)
Frank Miller: 300
Stanislav Grof: LSD Psychotherapy
Terence McKenna: Food of the Gods
Nick Cave: And the Ass Saw the Angel, King Ink 1 and 2
Steven Jesse Bernstein: I am Secretly an Important Man, More Noise Please. His other books are out of print but very worthy to find.
Hemingway: The Old Man and the Sea(I LOVE THAT BOOK)
Octave Mirbeau: The Torture Garden
Mediaeval Baebes: Songs of the Flesh
Arthur Kroker: Spasm
Isabel Allende: this woman is a goddess, everthing she writes is awesome.
And I just finished Dogeaters by Jessica Hagedorn
Absinthe Sip of Seduction is my favorite of the absinthe books.
deam
QUOTE (Billynorm @ Apr 24 2004, 01:22 AM)
If it was a battle royale among the authors, editors, translators & contributors...

What I meant by the fist-fight thing was more content-of-one-book vs. content-of-the-other. When I read Sip of Seduction I found the content lacking; it seemed almost as though the book I was reading was an abridged version of what the book should have been. A Myth Always Green, on the other hand, was almost exactly what I was expecting, content wise.
Abnorman
QUOTE (deam @ Apr 24 2004, 02:01 PM)
What I meant by the fist-fight thing was more content-of-one-book vs. content-of-the-other. When I read Sip of Seduction I found the content lacking; it seemed almost as though the book I was reading was an abridged version of what the book should have been. A Myth Always Green, on the other hand, was almost exactly what I was expecting, content wise.

I knew exactly what you meant, I was just riffing. Look here.
Raschied Britannica
High Comic art - definitely Neil Gaiman's Sandman novels. Also see anything from Alan Moore, like Watchmen, The Killing Joke, and Swamp Thing 27-33.

Novels I've read lately -

Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card. I've reread this series many times now. It gets a bit too heavy on the metaphysics after the first book, but I still enjoy it. Can't wait to see who they cast in the movie.

Carter Beats the Devil - by Glenn David Gould. An interesting read, set mostly in early-20th century San Francisco. Carter was a real magician, but this is all fiction. If you travel, you probably saw it in every airport in the country last year. worth picking up.

Inferno - Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle - Dante's Hell from the viewpoint of a sci-fi writer.

Angels and Demons - Dan Brown - I liked this one better than the DaVinci Code.

Gunslinger series - Stephen King - Now that the Bastard has finished the series, I can finally recommend it. The Dark Tower is the glue that holds all of King's universe together. Eagerly awaiting publication of books 6 & 7.

Any of the Cyberpunk series by William Gibson. Burning Chrome, Neuromancer, and Mona Lisa Overdrive still have a shiny chrome spot in my heart.

Job: a Comedy of Justice by Heinlein. Multiple Universes, and the Church of the Everlasting Orgasm. Classic.

The Tripods Trilogy by John Christopher. I recently bought these for my 12-year old son, since they were a favorite of my pre-teen childhood. Christopher added a 4th book, a prequel, since the last time I read it. Still great stuff.

No list would be complete without my personal "guilty pleasure" - the original 5 Amber books by Roger Zelazny. Start with "9 Princes in Amber" and stop with "The Courts of Chaos." I'd love to see SciFi make a miniseries out of these.
Kirk
QUOTE (Billynorm @ Apr 24 2004, 02:07 PM)
When I read Sip of Seduction I found the content lacking; it seemed almost as though the book I was reading was an abridged version of what the book should have been. A Myth Always Green, on the other hand, was almost exactly what I was expecting, content wise

That's because Betty is an abridged version of what a person ought to be.
Abnorman
QUOTE (Billynorm @ Apr 24 2004, 02:07 PM)
When I read Sip of Seduction I found the content lacking; it seemed almost as though the book I was reading was an abridged version of what the book should have been. A Myth Always Green, on the other hand, was almost exactly what I was expecting, content wise
Actually, deam said that.
QUOTE (Kirk @ Apr 25 2004, 10:02 AM)
That's because Betty is an abridged version of what a person ought to be.
spam_laser.gif
LaMuseVerte
Anyone by chance know how The Princess of Ireland (Doublin Saga) by Edward Rutherfurd is?
Absomphe
I picked up a copy, but haven't read it yet. It's Rutherfurd, though...how bad can it be?
dangerousangels
I just purchased Ghost of Chance by William S. Burroughs.
Very-nice micro-book.(58pgs)

For those with kids:
~Neil Gaiman: Coraline, The Wolves in the Walls
These are two of my daughters favorite books.
~Art Speigelman: Lil' Lit
There are three volumes. All of them ROCK. The first one has a game called Fairy Tale Road Rage. AWESOME as it teaches sentence/story construction.
~Francesca Lia Block: Rose and The Beast.
~Isabelle Allende: City of Beasts
Artemis
QUOTE
and if you've ever seen photos of Ted Breaux & Artemis, you'd know who'd win that match up.


1. Ted worked on "A Myth" - he read the whole text before publication and made suggestions, many of which were used.

2. In that picture, I'm wearing a jacket. Why do you think that is? It wasn't cold. My reach is longer than my arms.

3. If by some chance somebody did happen to whip my ass, he'd then have to whip my wife, and I'm not sure Ted is up to it.

4. I do go to Nebraska on occasion. You can test your theory in person, if you so desire. It won't tell you anything about Ted, but I can promise you a lasting impression of me, better than a photograph.
Artemis
I was just riffing, too.

I haven't seen the "Sip". I'm not interested.
AndrewT
I recently finished rereading Gulliver's Travels. It's been quite a few years, and the political satire was much more obvious this time through. I also ordered Why I'm not a Christian by Bertrand Russel, which is sure to be interesting. I'm also working on translating Takeuchi Yoshikazu's book Perfect Blue (which was made into a really fucked up anime- one of the few movies that's more confusing the second time you watch it).

And in the less general category, I serendipitously found an atlas of the 19th century world for $15 at B&N, which made me happy. I also finished Vox Latina, a fascinating book that reviews all extant documents referring to Latin pronunciation before 300 AD to recreate "authentic" Roman Empire-era Latin pronunciation. On a related note, I've been looking through Catullus' opera to find a suitable poem to set to music.
Gertz
QUOTE (AndrewT @ Apr 28 2004, 04:58 AM)
I also finished Vox Latina, a fascinating book that reviews all extant documents referring to Latin pronunciation before 300 AD to recreate "authentic" Roman Empire-era Latin pronunciation. On a related note, I've been looking through Catullus' opera to find a suitable poem to set to music.

Now that sounds like the kind of geeky book that I would love to read. I'm pretty sure Mel Gibson didn't read it.

As for Catullus - do you know Carl Orff's "Catulli Carmina"? The second part of the "Trionfi" (of which the far better known "Carmina Burana" is the first) ... the third part, "Trionfo di Afrodite" is also partly based on Catullus (the wedding poems).
anticlimacus
Hermann Hesse's Glass Bead Game and Narcissus
and Goldmund.

Thomas Mann's Doktor Faustus.

Dostoyevsky's Brothers Karamazov. (No finer
work.)

Kafka's The Trial. (Not the greatest novel per se,
but the finest writing.)

GK Chesterton's Man Who Was Thursday.

Dante's Purgatorio.

For great ghost stories, do some leg work and
find stuff by the Rev. Henry S. Whitehead and
Robert Aikman. Lovecraft's cool, too.
thegreenimp
From Autogiro to Gyroplane
The amazing survival of an aviation technology

by Bruce Charnov

Fun read if you like things with rotors.
AndrewT
QUOTE (Gertz @ Apr 28 2004, 02:51 AM)
Now that sounds like the kind of geeky book that I would love to read. I'm pretty sure Mel Gibson didn't read it.

As for Catullus - do you know Carl Orff's "Catulli Carmina"? The second part of the "Trionfi" (of which the far better known "Carmina Burana" is the first) ... the third part, "Trionfo di Afrodite" is also partly based on Catullus (the wedding poems).

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detai...=books&n=507846

I've yet to see Mel's little field day, but I hear he uses Italian pronunciation with it and completely forgets about Greek (Khristos is not some made up word).

I'm familiar with Orff's settings, but I'm sure I could do a much better job. And I'd pick better poems to set too. Catullus wrote more than sappy love poetry.

http://www.negenborn.net/catullus/text2/e69.htm

I'll save my rants about Orff's music for another time though biggrin.gif
Gertz
QUOTE (AndrewT @ Apr 28 2004, 03:11 PM)
I've yet to see Mel's little field day, but I hear he uses Italian pronunciation with it and completely forgets about Greek (Khristos is not some made up word).


The pronunciation is indeed very italian, with the c's pronounced like the "cz" in "czech".

And no greek. Not even written on the cross.
Abnorman
QUOTE (LaMuseVerte @ Apr 22 2004, 12:34 AM)
A Clockwork Orange by Burgess if you can read the British slang... gets in the way of enjoying it at times, but easy to catch on.

A Clockwork Orange glossary.
Absomphe
QUOTE (Billynorm @ Apr 29 2004, 11:35 AM)
QUOTE (LaMuseVerte @ Apr 22 2004, 12:34 AM)
A Clockwork Orange by Burgess if you can read the British slang... gets in the way of enjoying it at times, but easy to catch on.

A Clockwork Orange glossary.

If that annoyed you, you best not tackle "Gangs of New York" , the book, or you'll be driving youself nuts, referring to the extensive glossary.
Conju
I'm a fantasy novel person and only have a few reccomendations

The Myst books (all 3 of them)

The entire dark tower series by stephen king.
dangerousangels
QUOTE (conju @ Apr 29 2004, 12:50 PM)
I'm a fantasy novel person and only have a few reccomendations

The Myst books (all 3 of them)

The entire dark tower series by stephen king.

Dont forget Cycle of the Werewolf by Mr. King then.
Thats a great little book!
D. Gray
The books I am reading at the moment in no particular order:

Oscar Wilde - The Picture of Dorian Gray and other works (for the 4th time harhar.gif )
Samuel T. Coleridge - Complete works (especially "The Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner", not too original I know...)
Edgar Allan Poe - Complete works (I always like a dose of Poe)
Aleister Crowley - Moonchild (I'm not too sure what to think of it yet)
Margaret Weis et al - Dragonlance Chronicles (for the 17563rd time)
Mads Christensen - Blærerøvens Guide til Manden (An indispensible guide to showing off, Gertz probably knows that one viking_emoticon.gif )
Alfred, Lord Tennyson - Complete Works (I'm not really into Tennyson, but I read enough to find my sig wacko.gif )
Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy (I'm halfway through hell at the moment, looking forward to the rest)
Charles Baudelaire - Les Fleurs du Mal (Danish translation, my french is almost non-existent, something I am looking forward to remedy)
Paris i Firserne ("Paris in the 80's" Wonderful book my mother found me, explaining the highlife in Paris in the 1880's. Numerous references to absinthe and opium)

As you can see I have a hard time sticking to one book at a time, I usually find a book that suits my mood.
Grim
The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Volume I - Feynamn, Leighton and Sands

Radiation Detection and Measurement - Knoll

House of Leaves - Mark Z. Danielewski

All but the last are impossible for me to read after one glass.
anticlimacus
How are you liking House of Leaves? A friend
recommended it to me a while back but I've not
yet read it.
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