Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: Figure this out ifn you can.
The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > The Monkey Hole > Arts & Philosphical Sundries
Pages: 1, 2
mr-rabid
http://personal.baker.edu/web2/cdavis09/roses.html

I feel smart. I got it in three tries.

le Gimp
Two rolls.

I actually had the right answer the first time, but planar technology thwarted me.
verbal_kraze
QUOTE
It had taken Dr. Duke well over a year himself, and he would always explain that the smarter you were, the longer it took to figure it out.


Well I still can't figure the thing out, or what the hell they mean by "petals around the rose". I guess, according to Dr Duke, I must be a friggin genius and you guys are mildly retarted, 2-3 tries, HA! harhar.gif
le Gimp
It is a geek enginer test thingie.
JAMBO!!!
Seen this before.

Took me 4 the first time.

I won't spoil it for anyone, but PETALS around the rose.

Around.
Barsnake
I was the slowest to figure it out among my workgroup...searched online - found that everybody is protecting this well - so i was determined to figure it out...the clue petals around the rose did not help me...
I did find a discussion group where a guy said he learned it as polar bears around an icehole...
this was more visual...also found a site that used only 4 dice...and one that said the answer was always even - I finally got it...
musicgeek
QUOTE (JAMBO!!! @ Jun 23 2004, 10:34 AM)
I won't spoil it for anyone, but PETALS around the rose.

Sure...just give it all away. harhar.gif
traineraz
Where's the hard part to that? First try. Did two more rolls to be sure.

Got any challenging puzzles?
hartsmar
Yeah, way to easy...

mr-rabid
I think it's only hard if you are used to solving math puzzles.

You will engage the wrong part of your brain by habit... the real puzzle is in defining the problem, not solving it.
verbal_kraze
Well, I had some absinthe last night, came back, and now I figured the thing out on the first try. I guess yesterday I was smart, and now the absinthe has made me as dumb as the rest of you. harhar.gif abs-cheers.gif
grey boy
First try right, plus many trys left after that.
D. Gray
3rd try.
Absomphe
Senor estupido? harhar.gif
Grim
3,742
Grim
3,743...call me Mr. Dirac.
Absomphe
If you insist...
MarKoPoLo
I got it right the first time, but now I cant seem to get it right since...Beginner's luck?
MarKoPoLo
Ah hell! I get it now! Damnit I can be stupid...


Don't even say it...
Absomphe


KILLJOY!!!
harhar.gif
Balzdeep
I AM A MORON! Can someone with a "Dr" before their name explain the sumbitch to me?
rjordan
Yea, me too. I still don't get it. And I don't care to either. So there. Nanner, nanner, nanner. harhar.gif

gun thug.gif
MarKoPoLo
QUOTE (Absomphe @ Jul 3 2004, 08:27 PM)


KILLJOY!!!
harhar.gif

ENJOY harhar.gif
Grim
The Mystical Ball (No it's not porn.)
mr-rabid
Am I not getting it, or is the Mystic Ball supposed to be wrong every time?
Alpha Soixante
Don't admit that! It means you're doing the math wrong every time.
le Gimp
That is just Too Much!

I need another beer.
MarKoPoLo
It worked the first time then it was just wrong afterwards. Every single time afterwards but hey, whose counting?
verbal_kraze
Obviously not you harhar.gif
Absomphe
His math just HAS to be better than his English.

Doesn't it?user posted image
le Gimp
I still havn't figured out how it CAN work. I got the first one wrong, then six in a row correct. Given the number of options, that has to be some large statistical probablility against that happening by chance.
verbal_kraze
I figured it out a while ago. Each time you refresh the page, or click for the answer the little icons change. There are only a few possible answers, and all of those #'s have the same little icon next to them.
le Gimp
Just did the math starting at 99 working down. It forms a series which is easy to manipulate as you indicated.

Interesting. It looks amazing if one has several drinks and does ot think about it.
verbal_kraze
Yeah I was amazed by it for quite a while, but just kept doing it until I found the pattern. It's still a pretty good trick.
MarKoPoLo
QUOTE (Absomphe @ Jul 6 2004, 10:07 AM)
His math just HAS to be better than his English.

Doesn't it?user posted image

Nah, it doesnt have to. Besides I make up for these shortcomings with my rugged good looks and charming smile. wink.gif
Artemis
What rose?

tabreaux
I got it on the first try. It seemed ridiculously obvious. According to the short commentary however, perhaps I should be concerned... wacko.gif
Absomphe
No, just accept your remarkable genius,and get on with your avocation of providing your fellow absintheurs, and absintheuses with their daily liquid bliss, please!

Even after thirty years of gourmet beer tasting (a few of those as a paid taster), I have never had the privelege of enjoying such exquisitely crafted nectars, as the two Jades you have released, so far.

I can't wait for the reprises!!!!! LARS!.gif
sixela
QUOTE (tabreaux @ Aug 6 2004, 06:20 AM)
I got it on the first try. It seemed ridiculously obvious.

It was to anyone who's read Charles Paliser's "The Quincunx", of course.
tabreaux
QUOTE (sixela @ Aug 6 2004, 04:28 AM)
QUOTE (tabreaux @ Aug 6 2004, 06:20 AM)
I got it on the first try.  It seemed ridiculously obvious.

It was to anyone who's read Charles Paliser's "The Quincunx", of course.


I understand it is the quintessential example of an epic novel.

How clever you are, Mr. Sixela.
Artemis
Presented with the question, "how many petals on the rose?" and seeing not a rose, but a row of dice, my emotional response was disgust.

So I randomly chose an answer, three times in a row. One was right, two were wrong.

Analyzing the "correct" answer vs. the "wrong" answers, apparently the intent is that the center dot, when there is one, is the "rose" and the dots surrounding it are the "petals", if memory serves me correctly.

What do I win?

What did I miss?

What is reality, Poppa?
Pataphysician
QUOTE
Presented with the question, "how many petals on the rose?" and seeing not a rose, but a row of dice, my emotional response was disgust.

So I randomly chose an answer, three times in a row. One was right, two were wrong.


Exactly the same with me, except that I got it right the 3 out of 3 times. I thought it was rigged to always win, so I tried a fourth time and lost.
Oxygenee
Please, that was far too easy.
Let's up the ante a little:

The Monkey's Mother
——————
A rope hangs over a pulley. On one end is a weight. Balanced on the other end is a monkey of equal weight. The rope weighs 4oz. per foot. The age of the monkey and the age of its mother together equal 4 years. The weight of the monkey is as many pounds as its mother is years old. The mother is twice as old as the monkey was when the mother was half as old as the monkey will be when the monkey is three times as old as the mother was when the mother was three times as old as the monkey. The weight of the weight plus the weight of the rope is half as much again as the difference between twice the weight of the weight and the weight of the monkey. How long is the rope?
musicgeek
My guess is 4 feet.
Grim
Let's see...

"t" being the difference in years between mother and son monkey...

t sub mother minus t sub son equals t sub mother minus son which equals t. t sub mother is thrice t sub son, making 3 times t sub mother minus t sub son equal to 2 times t sub son. Normalizes to t; (3/2) t minus (1/2) t equals t. 3 times (3/2)t equals (9/2)t. Half that equals (9/4)t. For the son then, (9/4) t minus t would equal...(9/4) - (4/4) or (5/4). Twice that is (10/4)t [making the son (3/2)t]. (10/4) + (6/4) is already equal to 4, so t = 1, and (10/4) is equivalent to the mum's age, which just so happens to equal the weight of the monkey, which is in turn equal to the weight of the weight.

The weight of the weight plus (1/4) times the length of the rope is equal to (1/2) times the whole quantity, twice the weight of the weight plus the weight of the monkey. Substitute weight of the weight for the weight of the monkey, and solve for length of the rope. Length of the rope, L, is equal to twice the weight of the weight, W.

2(2.5) = L

And there you have it; the rope is five feet long.

Too early for this shit Oxy!
Grim
Did I win a free set of antique cuillères?!? Or a sample of P.F.?...

<cricket chirps>

Damn. Didn't think so. frusty.gif
Oxygenee
QUOTE (monsieurgrim @ Aug 8 2004, 06:06 PM)
Let's see...

"t" being the difference in years between mother and son monkey...

t sub mother minus t sub son equals t sub mother minus son which equals t.  t sub mother is thrice t sub son, making 3 times t sub mother minus t sub son equal to 2 times t sub son.  Normalizes to t; (3/2) t minus (1/2) t  equals t.  3 times (3/2)t equals (9/2)t.  Half that equals (9/4)t.  For the son then, (9/4) t minus t would equal...(9/4) - (4/4) or (5/4).  Twice that is (10/4)t [making the son (3/2)t].  (10/4) + (6/4) is already equal to 4, so t = 1, and (10/4) is equivalent to the mum's age, which just so happens to equal the weight of the monkey, which is in turn equal to the weight of the weight.

The weight of the weight plus (1/4) times the length of the rope is equal to (1/2) times the whole quantity, twice the weight of the weight plus the weight of the monkey.  Substitute weight of the weight for the weight of the monkey, and solve for length of the rope.  Length of the rope, L, is equal to twice the weight of the weight, W.

2(2.5) = L

And there you have it; the rope is five feet long.

Too early for this shit Oxy!

If you didn't Google it, that's pretty damn good.

Here, for what it's worth, is my layman's solution:

Let c = the difference in their ages. The monkey cannot catch up with his mother, so this is a constant – it can’t change (in other words you can ignore it until you’ve arrived at their current ages).

Then working from the back of the sentence:

…when the mother was three times as old as the monkey.
means that the mother is 1.5c and the monkey is 0.5c

….when the monkey is three times as old as the mother was...
means that the monkey is 4.5c

….when the mother was half as old as the monkey will be…
the mother is 2.25c
therefore, the monkey must be 1.25c

….The mother is twice as old as the monkey was…
the mother is 2.5c
therefore the monkey is currently 1.5c

Since their ages add up to 4, c must = 1: ie the mother is 2.5 years, and the monkey is 1.5 years.

Since the monkey’s weight is the same as the mother’s age, the monkey weighs 2,5lbs.

Now let x = the length of the rope.

Since there are 16oz to the lb, and the rope weighs 4oz/foot, the weight of the rope in pounds is 0.25x .

Now we’ve been told that the monkey weighs the same as the weight. Lets call this amount w (we of course have already calculated that w is 2.5lbs)
Therefore:
The weight of the weight plus the weight of the rope is half as much again as the difference between twice the weight of the weight and the weight of the monkey.
means: w + 0.25x = 1.5 (2w – w)
simplifying: w + 0.25x = 1.5w
simplifying: 0.25x = 0.5w
ie: x = 2w

Since w = 2.5lbs, x = 5 feet!
Oxygenee
QUOTE (monsieurgrim @ Aug 8 2004, 06:09 PM)
Did I win a free set of antique cuillères?!? Or a sample of P.F.?...


Unfortunately no. But you DO get a.......

<golf clap>
Grim
QUOTE
1.5c and the monkey is 0.5c


"(3/2) t minus (1/2) t equals t"

QUOTE
the monkey is 4.5c


"equals (9/2)t"

QUOTE
the mother is 2.25c


"Twice that is (10/4)"

QUOTE
monkey must be 1.25c


"(3/2)t"

QUOTE
x = 2w


"2(2.5) = L"

We're practically speaking out of either side of the same mouth, I would say. Ain't math perty.

What I still can't understand is why this would have been impossible for me to do after one morning absinthe! I really think there is a flagrant link between the action of absinthe on the brain and its inhibition of mathematical reasoning. Conceptual models (to a limited degree), creative thinking - more unrestrained logic - are taken beyond their normal fruition...but I have difficulties with even algebra after drinking a few glasses. I've always wondered if this affects others in a like manner...but the only historical references suggesting the effect of absinthe on the brain, I have ever encountered, are from the coign of vantage of a poet. Surely, there must be some mention by the likes of someone who bridged the gap between physicist and gentlemen author (the likes of Poincaré! would be fantastic)? Do you know of any, Oxy?
Hiram
QUOTE (Oxygenee @ Aug 8 2004, 05:57 AM)
... How long is the rope?

Shorter than the problem. I should'na looked at this before coffee.
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2018 Invision Power Services, Inc.