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The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > Absinthe & Absinthiana > Absinthe in the News & in the Media
Molly
I can't believe I'm the first to post this. Great honest article, gotta love the last line.

"...offering as much money as you can and maybe still not finding what you're looking for. Next year you'll find absinthe in all the supermarkets. We're going to have the absinthe of the bazaar."


Rebirth of the Potion That Made Val-de-Travers Famous
Absomphe
I grew up in NYC, reading the Times.

Now, I'm just a hayseed, from East Bumfuck, Egypt, who gets the East Bumfuck Herald delivered every morning.

I'm happier now though.

P.S.

I would have enjoyed reading the article, but it's coming up "unavailable".

Damned New York Times.



Kirk
Water from the toilet
From the horses mouth ,
he (Kubler ) got that almost right:



He now plans to make a new, more powerful absinthe that he says will have "a more elegant, refined taste than the one I'm making now."

"It's like the difference between toilet water and a fine perfume," he said.

hartsmar
QUOTE
Armed with plastic containers of dried herbs, tubs of pharmaceutical ethanol, a homemade still and a secret recipe from a friend's grandmother,


Yup, caramba! Top notch...

sleepy.gif
Kirk

Many a good absinthe has been made with that stuff ,
almost all of it
almost.
Molly


The New York Times

COUVET, Switzerland, Nov. 1 - For three years Claude-Alain Bugnon has competed with his wife for space in the unfinished concrete basement of their home here, she to do laundry, he to make absinthe.

Armed with plastic containers of dried herbs, tubs of pharmaceutical ethanol, a homemade still and a secret recipe from a friend's grandmother, Mr. Bugnon has used his skills as an oil refinery technician to produce the powerful herbal elixir long blamed for driving people mad.

In January a new law takes effect in Switzerland aimed at rehabilitating the reputation of absinthe, whose distillation, distribution and sale were banned after an absinthe-besotted factory worker killed his wife and children nearly a century ago.

The new law will allow Mr. Bugnon and dozens of other underground absinthe makers to "come out," as one Swiss newspaper put it, seek amnesty and produce absinthe legally.

"Absinthe is good for your health and I drink it almost every day," said Mr. Bugnon, filling glasses with his still illegal beverage. "My kids are growing up with its smell. Of course, I still have to be a bit careful. Until the end of the year I could be denounced by an enemy and turned in."

For Swiss distillers like Mr. Bugnon, the goal is to produce top quality, high-octane, government-approved absinthe produced from Artemisia absinthium, or wormwood, a plant native to the Val-de-Travers, the region in western Switzerland where the drink was invented.

If all goes well the distillers hope to obtain an official governmental "appellation" declaring that the region produces the only real absinthe in the world. Legalization will help the Swiss cash in on the rising global market for absinthe, which can be bought easily, and often illegally, over the Internet. There are Internet sites offering absinthe recipes and sources for wormwood seed.

In addition to prodigious amounts of alcohol, absinthe contains chop.gif, a toxic chemical found in wormwood that was used to treat stomach ailments as far back as ancient times but can cause tremors, hallucinations, paralysis and brain damage in large enough doses.

Absinthe with a low level of chop.gif is already sold legally in countries including Canada, Germany, New Zealand, Austria, Japan, Sweden, Italy and Britain, but not the United States. The Netherlands lifted its ban last July.

Nicknamed "the Green Fairy," "the green curse of France" and "the milk of the Jura," absinthe was associated with the writers, painters, prostitutes and anarchists of the belle epoque. Oscar Wilde claimed to have seen tulips growing from the tile floor of a bar where he had been drinking absinthe. Toulouse-Lautrec mixed it with cognac instead of water and called it the "Earthquake."

Its seductive powers have been featured in a flurry of films in recent years, from "Moulin Rouge," in which a song is dedicated to the drink, to "From Hell," in which Johnny Depp plays a troubled, absinthe drinking police inspector.

Mr. Bugnon is still tinkering with the right mix of herbs (among them fennel, coriander, mint and anise) for a substance that will have 53 percent alcohol content and turn creamy and slightly bluish when diluted with water. It will contain 30 to 35 milligrams per liter of chop.gif, less than the concoctions of a century ago.

Mr. Bugnon has received a small metal license plate from the Swiss government that has been soldered to his still. An Italian illustrator has designed an elegant green label. A German importer wants to take his product abroad.

Even though Mr. Bugnon has proven is that it does not take much to make a great absinthe, he faces formidable competition.

Two miles away in the village of Môtiers is the headquarters of the Blackmint Distillery, owned by Yves Kübler, a former electrical technician whose great-grandfather was a regional absinthe producer.

Four years ago the absinthe ban was eased to allow Mr. Kübler to legally distill and sell, locally and abroad, an "extract of absinthe," a 90-proof liqueur with 10 milligrams of chop.gif per liter. With the local agriculture department, he helped persuade farmers to cultivate wormwood again so he could produce an authentic regional absinthe.

He has already begun to package $35 boxed Christmas gift packages with half-liter bottles of absinthe, two monogrammed glasses and a perforated spoon in the shape of an wormwood leaf for those who like to filter their drink through a sugar cube.

He now plans to make a new, more powerful absinthe that he says will have "a more elegant, refined taste than the one I'm making now."

"It's like the difference between toilet water and a fine perfume," he said.

There is even stiffer competition a few miles away in the French village of Pontarlier, where production began after France relaxed its ban in 1988, allowing producers to make a drink with less than 10 milligrams of chop.gif per liter.

Absinthe, after all, was first produced commercially in 1797 by Henri-Louis Pernod, a Frenchman whose father-in-law bought the recipe from its inventor, Pierre Ordinaire, a French doctor living in Couvet.

Complicating the market outlook, Spain, Portugal and the Czech Republic have never banned absinthe production, although their absinthes are much rougher than Swiss and French brands.

Not everyone in the Val-de-Travers is sanguine about legalization in Switzerland. For Pierre André Delachaux, a high school teacher and author of several books on absinthe, the move will destroy the mystique that came with the ban.

"I want to preserve the myth that comes with keeping absinthe forbidden and clandestine," said Mr. Delachaux, who is also the curator of a small museum in Môtiers with a special absinthe section.

"The myth is the thrill of breaking the law and not getting caught," he said. "The myth is offering as much money as you can and maybe still not finding what you're looking for. Next year you'll find absinthe in all the supermarkets. We're going to have the absinthe of the bazaar."
Kirk
Yeah ,
I saw that.
Wormwoody
Let's play "Spot the Pork Chop."

Someone sent me that yesterday and I was going to post it this morning, but you beat me to it.

So they eased up the laws for Yves, but if Claude-Alain gets caught, he's hosed? That's not fair.
pierreverte
>... "The myth is offering as much money as you can and maybe still not finding what you're looking for..."


uh, i do this all the time...the product is legal...its called 'wine.'
Perruche_verte
He is a great man, I'm sure, but he can keep the myth and let us have the absinthe.

After all, there is always going to be someone making a better absinthe, whether in fact or in rumor. The best absinthe is the one you can't have.
Rabelais
The Coffret de Noel at the Blackmint website looks interesting. Anyone tried to order one yet ?

The retailers listed at the site I've never heard of before. Spirits corner did not have it listed as a special. Guesses other than a drive to Couvet ?
abs-cheers.gif
Donnie Darko
Who needs it to be illegal to perpetuate the myth? Just let the Times say chop.gif over and over and the job is done, regardless of Absinthe's legal standing anywhere.
Absomphe
I agree with Donnie.

If the New York Times can't get it right, what publication will?

The myth will survive, despite legalization, relatively unscathed. I mean , after all, it's not like there will ever be thujonefest, like there was during the...



FIN de SIECLE!!!
, right?
Molly
Ahhhh, but this the Times.

QUOTE
absinthe contains chop.gif, a toxic chemical found in wormwood that was used to treat stomach ailments as far back as ancient times but can cause tremors, hallucinations, paralysis and brain damage in large enough doses.


Nothin but unassailable nuance. Just enough facts that your mind fills in the rest of the picture.

"well if I feed a lab rat 3 kilos of chopgifs a day and he......, then that must mean......"
Ari
QUOTE (hartsmar @ Nov 4 2004, 08:52 AM)
QUOTE
Armed with plastic containers of dried herbs, tubs of pharmaceutical ethanol, a homemade still and a secret recipe from a friend's grandmother,


Yup, caramba! Top notch...

sleepy.gif

Have we found the brother of the Reverend? wacko.gif

So much for supposably respectable news papers producing truthful articles.
Symbiote
I printed the story and gave it to a lady here at work for her to read. Her response, "I don't want that shit in my country!". So there you have it. She didn't PTFA.
Hiram
QUOTE (Ari @ Nov 4 2004, 12:40 PM)
supposably

No such word: supposedly.
traineraz
Djarum, you work with Djipshits.

It would probably have also been better to give her a GOOD article.
Ari
Bah. Stupid word. Well my spelling ability is still better than the Times research ability and that aint not half good.
Symbiote
QUOTE (traineraz @ Nov 4 2004, 01:42 PM)
Djarum, you work with Djipshits.

It would probably have also been better to give her a GOOD article.

Yes I do.

I don't think she could comprehend a "GOOD" article.
traineraz
However, a GOOD article wouldn't put BAD ideas into her head.
Absomphe
QUOTE (Hiram @ Nov 4 2004, 02:35 PM)
QUOTE (Ari @ Nov 4 2004, 12:40 PM)
supposably

No such word: supposedly.

A pet peeve of Tish's and mine, along with "irregardless" and a few other non-words that are slowly attempting to further pollute the English language by attempting to "legitimize" themselves.

Thank you for being the one to layeth the smacketh down, in this case! wub.gif
Absomphe
QUOTE (Molly @ Nov 4 2004, 01:36 PM)
Ahhhh, but this the Times.

Nothin but unassailable nuance. Just enough facts that your mind fills in the rest of the picture.


Yes, isn't it a shame that having a reputation as the most erudite newspaper, is tantamount to having the most expertise at covering your ass.

I repeat...

Damned New York Times.
Artemis
QUOTE
If the New York Times can't get it right, what publication will?


You can't be serious.
Absomphe
I'm sorry, Artemis, did I say the New York Times?

I must've meant the National Review. wacko.gif
Brett
I was going to quote a public enemy song, but I realize now they were refering to the NY Post.
I_B_Puffin
QUOTE (Ari @ Nov 4 2004, 12:40 PM)
QUOTE (hartsmar @ Nov 4 2004, 08:52 AM)
QUOTE
Armed with plastic containers of dried herbs, tubs of pharmaceutical ethanol, a homemade still and a secret recipe from a friend's grandmother,


Yup, caramba! Top notch...

sleepy.gif

Have we found the brother of the Reverend? wacko.gif

So much for supposably respectable news papers producing truthful articles.

I haven't taken the NY Times seriously in a long time.
I_B_Puffin
QUOTE (Absomphe @ Nov 4 2004, 02:52 PM)
QUOTE (Hiram @ Nov 4 2004, 02:35 PM)
QUOTE (Ari @ Nov 4 2004, 12:40 PM)
supposably

No such word: supposedly.

A pet peeve of Tish's and mine, along with "irregardless" and a few other non-words that are slowly attempting to further pollute the English language by attempting to "legitimize" themselves.

Thank you for being the one to layeth the smacketh down, in this case! wub.gif

It's already legitimate. At least if you go by Webster's.
Absomphe
poop.gif
morgueann
heart.gif pirate2.gif

It's been awhile since I've done a comic, so...
hartsmar
QUOTE (Artemis @ Nov 4 2004, 03:24 PM)
QUOTE
If the New York Times can't get it right, what publication will?


You can't be serious.

I was waiting for that one... abs-cheers.gif
WhyteKnight
If the truth sold newspapers...
hartsmar
Then truth would have to get up real early in the morning...
MrGreenGenes
The myth will exist - at least in the US - as long as it cannot be bought in US liquior stores.

During the 1970s people actually smuggled cases of Coors beer to the east coast where it was not available in stores. New Yorkers enjoying Coors knowing they're doing something slightly prohibited. They even made a movie - Smokey and the Bandit - about that.

Conju
QUOTE (WhyteKnight @ Nov 4 2004, 11:35 PM)
If the truth sold newspapers...

Where the fuck have you been.
Absomphe
I'll take a wild guess and say Wyoming.
MarKoPoLo
QUOTE (Ari @ Nov 4 2004, 02:23 PM)
Bah. Stupid word. Well my spelling ability is still better than the Times research ability and that aint not half good.

double plus ungood?
MarKoPoLo
QUOTE (MrGreenGenes @ Nov 5 2004, 09:25 AM)
The myth will exist - at least in the US - as long as it cannot be bought in US liquior stores.

During the 1970s people actually smuggled cases of Coors beer to the east coast where it was not available in stores. New Yorkers enjoying Coors knowing they're doing something slightly prohibited. They even made a movie - Smokey and the Bandit - about that.

You know, i never really got the point of that damn movie. And why the fuck didnt the cops pull the semi's over, or atleast shoot out some tires...?
Conju
QUOTE (Absomphe @ Nov 5 2004, 02:41 PM)
I'll take a wild guess and say Wyoming.

Oh yeah, I forgot.


I keep forgetting to write down every post I see.
Absomphe
Or you could have checked his profile, genius.
Triq
QUOTE(MarKoPoLo @ Nov 6 2004, 03:29 PM) *

QUOTE(MrGreenGenes @ Nov 5 2004, 09:25 AM)
The myth will exist - at least in the US - as long as it cannot be bought in US liquior stores.

During the 1970s people actually smuggled cases of Coors beer to the east coast where it was not available in stores. New Yorkers enjoying Coors knowing they're doing something slightly prohibited. They even made a movie - Smokey and the Bandit - about that.

You know, i never really got the point of that damn movie. And why the fuck didnt the cops pull the semi's over, or atleast shoot out some tires…?


Isn't that a little mutually exclusive????

"enjoying"…and … "coors" in the same sentence?
Tibro
Nah. The cans are unsurpassed for target practice.
Absomphe
Busch cans are better, especially if the 'c' is scratched off first.
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