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The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > Absinthe & Absinthiana > Vintage Absinthe
Barski
Just a few questions for those of you familiair with / in possesion of vintage bottles. I'm trying to find out some details about them and sofar I haven't gotten all the answers. Anyway here's what I'd like to find out:

- Which bottles were most often used; 1L or something closer to 0,75L?
- What color glass was normally used for the fabrication of the bottles and is there a reason for that specific color to be used?
- How much would an empty bottle weigh?

Thanx,

Barski
pierreverte
- Which bottles were most often used; 1L or something closer to 0,75L?

1 liter / 0.50 liter are the most common

- What color glass was normally used for the fabrication of the bottles and is there a reason for that specific color to be used?

dark olive green:
color originaly came from coal and made a more sturdy glass for shipping, dark color protects contents from light and after a while it became traditional, however, my berger bottle (circa 1910) is light aqua

- How much would an empty bottle weigh?

1 liter = 650 grams
hartsmar
...and just for the record I have a ca 1900-1910 bottle which is brown.

and I recall somewhere in the back of my head that some flasks from Pernod Tarragona from around 1940-50 was cobalt blue.

Artemis
QUOTE
I'm trying to find out some details


Why? Are you buying bottles or building bottles?
Oxygenee
Verreries Goudon:
Oxygenee
Verreries Richarme:

thegreenimp
While not as old as Belle Epoch bottles, I've seen variations in color with vintage Herbsaint bottles, running from dark green to somewhat lighter green, as the years went by.

I'm sure materails changed depending on supply and availability, and what the maker had for lunch that day.



Barski
Well Artemis, let's just say that we're not quite sitting still here in the Netherlands wink.gif I can't say anything more at this time, sorry. Anyway, thanks guys, I appreciate the input. Some thoughts on why green was used most often?
Greenmeanie
Green, and other dark colors, keeps sunlight from degrading the product.
Barski
That's what I thought. The color of the glass that was used porbably didn't matter just as long as it was keeping the light out. Perhaps the thickness of the glass was also important but then again 700grams is pretty average for a wine bottle. Only Champagne bottles are heavier and thicker to withstand the pressure.
Artemis
QUOTE
Well Artemis, let's just say that we're not quite sitting still here in the Netherlands


That's what I suspected. Good luck.
Artemis
Here is the gospel of bottles according to Cusenier:

Elles offrent cinq formes différentes, affectées a des liqueurs spéciales.
La forme A appelée Boule est en verre blanc, corps sphérique, col allonge. Elle est exclusivement réservée au Peppermint.
La forme B est en verre vert clair; elle est appelée litre a cachet; le corps est cylindrique, forme élevée. Elle renferme spécialement la liqueur Cusenier, l'absinthe, le bitter, le cognac et autres spiritueux.
La forme C corps cylindrique, col court, verre blanc, dite pomponnelle, est destinée spécialement a l'anisette, mais elle renferme toutes les liqueurs non dénommées ci devant et ci apres.
La forme D, en verre vert clair, corps sphérique, col court, forme basse, est spéciale au curaçao sec et triple sec, on l'appelle marteau.
La forme E, en verre vert clair, appelée Martinique : elle est destinée a loger les liqueurs appelées crèmes.
Le curaçao doux est loge en cruchons, forme haute.
sixela
QUOTE (Barski @ Apr 2 2005, 08:13 PM)
Well Artemis, let's just say that we're not quite sitting still here in the Netherlands wink.gif

Quickly! We need a word filter to transmogrify that word "still"!
celticgent
Well Artemis, let's just say that we're not quite sitting

user posted image


here in the Netherlands
Absomphe
QUOTE (sixela @ Apr 5 2005, 08:53 AM)

Quickly! We need a word filter to transmogrify that word "still"!

Perhaps you'd substitute "stilted"? harhar.gif
morgueann
QUOTE (thegreenimp @ Apr 2 2005, 04:22 PM)
While not as old as Belle Epoch bottles, I've seen variations in color with vintage Herbsaint bottles, running from dark green to somewhat lighter green, as the years went by.

I'm sure materails changed depending on supply and availability, and what the maker had for lunch that day.

Call me a glassware idiot, but just exposure to sunlight in some cases maybe?
Barski
You know, I like the Tarragona bottles, they look big and classy. Any idea what their empty weight would be? I'd like to see those bottles on the shelves again. Another question: how much would a bottle of Pernod have costed in todays money, say US$'s ?




By the way, "Sitting still" was my translation of "stil zitten", hmm, guess what Dutch doesn't always translate very well to English, is me that what! biggrin.gif

Unfortunaltly peanutbutter (helaas pindakaas)
Donnie Darko
I think "still" translated the way people were hoping it would, as in "alambic".
Artemis
QUOTE
By the way, "Sitting still" was my translation of "stil zitten", hmm, guess what Dutch doesn't always translate very well to English


It translated perfectly well - they knew what you meant. But I assumed people who wear wooden shoes also read French. If not:

They offer five different shapes, used specially for certain liquors.
Form A, called boule, is of clear glass, with a spherical body, and a long neck. It is exclusively reserved for Peppermint.
Form B is of clear green glass; it is called liter a cachet; the body is cylindrical and tall. It is used especially for Cusenier liqueur, absinthe, bitters, cognac and other spirits.
Form C has a cylindrical body and a short neck, of clear glass known as the pomponnelle. It is intended especially for anisette, but it contains all liquors not otherwise specified above or below.
Form D, of clear green glass, with spherical body, short collar, and squat, is specially used for dry curaçao and triple sec, it is called the marteau.
Form E, of clear green glass, is called martinique: it is used for liquors called cremes.
Sweet curaçao is placed into tall jugs.
brucer
I think green is the "cheapest" colour for glass. That is, cullet, or glass shards, of blue, brown, yellow, red, etc., can be used to make green glass while the reverse is not true. Blue glass is more expensive, I believe. Glass manufacture traditionally involved a lot of "internal recycling", ie off-cuts were melted down again.

Of course, I am talking about 19th and early 20th century techniques.

Bruce
Kirk
Today it is cheaper to toss glass than to try and recycle it .
Helfrich
QUOTE (Barski @ Apr 2 2005, 10:07 PM)
The color of the glass that was used porbably didn't matter just as long as it was keeping the light out.

Chlorophyll absorbs light in the blue and red spectrum. If you want to use tinted glass to preserve the colour you should choose green or brown, not blue or red.
Absomphe
A dark , rich cobalt blue isn't bad either.
Brett
As far as beers go, dark brown bottles are best for preservation, storage and cellaring.
Absomphe
...unless the beer is Canadian, in which case, who cares?*


*

Unibroue products excepted, of course.
Jack Batemaster
half of them are crap too
Absomphe
More than half, actually, but the good ones are worth the hunt.
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