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Full Version: Vintage Edouard Pernod: ca. 1900-1915
The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > Absinthe & Absinthiana > Vintage Absinthe
Deluge
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Deluge
Edouard Pernod and Jade Edouard Absinthe

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user posted image Cheers!
Deluge
COLOR BEFORE WATER 10/10
Feuille Morte … This absinthe is nearly 100 years old. It has aged well over time and has faded, as it should, like an autumn leaf.

LOUCHE ACTION 10/10
The louche began much more slowly in the Edouard than in the Pernod Fils. As more ice water was added by fountain it became very thick with a nice translucent band at the top. At 4:1 this drink was as opaque as milk!

COLOR AFTER WATER 10/10
Now even though this sample was dark brown the finished louche was to my surprise a rather opalescent green. (My camera does not do it justice) I recall Mr. Hartsmar’s similar surprise when sampling vintage Berger absinthe.

AROMA 28/30
The nose of this sample neat is unlike any commercial or clandestine absinthe available. The aroma is remarkably similar to Pernod Fils yet I found this sample to be a bit more floral in its character with a bit less heat. There was also the same dusky scent that I noted in the samples of Pernod Fils. This aroma has been described as a baby powder scent and I feel that it is attributed to its age. I have also been told however that the aroma may come from the variety of hyssop which was used in its production. The aroma after the louche is quite mellow and very pleasant.

MOUTHFEEL 10/10
The full bodied and rounded mouthfeel of the Edouard was reminiscent of vintage Pernod Fils… Thick yet very well refined. I cannot think of any brand on the market like it.

TASTE 19/20
The flavor of this sample has been well preserved. Overall the flavors of the herbs have become much more unified and the alcohol base seems to have mellowed considerably. The anise and fennel seem to predominate and they taste dusky and dry. The wormwood is there and does come out in the slightly bitter finish. There are other subtle herbal notes that I cannot quite pin down. I am not sure if some of these flavors are attributed to the age of this absinthe or ingredients that I do not recognize. There were flavors almost like cinnamon, ginger or cardamom. Compared to Vintage Pernod Fils the Edouard seems to be a bit lighter in its flavor and a bit sweeter.

OVERALL IMPRESSION 10/10
Although this absinthe is not the finest absinthe I have ever had it was unique and it was a treat to sample. Given the rarity of this drink I give it a ten. Having had the opportunity to sample this along with vintage Pernod Fils I will say the Jades are on definitely the right track.


Total: 97/100
Deluge
While I am at it...

Vintage Pernod Fils: ca 1900-1910

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Deluge
COLOR BEFORE WATER 10/10
At nearly 100 years old this absinthe, like the Edouard, was what has been described as being the color “Feuille Morte”. It has aged well over time and has faded, as it should, like an autumn leaf.

LOUCHE ACTION 10/10
Bringing the glass under the fountain the louche began almost immediately and was a lot stronger than I had expected. There were beautiful gradient lines in the glass that swirled around until the final stage at which the contents became very opaque.

COLOR AFTER WATER 10/10
The final stage of the louche was very thick and became quite a nice shade of white. Considering how brown the sample was before water I was amazed at the final shade of the louche.

AROMA 30/30
The nose was much more intense than I had imagined. There was a considerable amount of heat! I had assumed that a bottle over 90 years old would have mellowed out much more. The scent was very fragrant and full of spice! It was very well balanced and was unlike anything I had smelled before. The aroma of the bouquet was brilliant and it certainly filled the room! I could really smell the heavy fragrance in the air. There was a rich musky/spicy character that I have not witnessed in any other commercial or clandestine absinthe! The aroma of Pernod Fils was very unique indeed.

MOUTH-FEEL 10/10
The mouth feel was another big surprise; it had a consistency similar to that of skim milk! It was very heavy and rich in the mouth. Unlike anything available

TASTE 18/20
Tasting the Pernod neat was very, very good! Although the alcohol was sharp to the nose it was subdued on the tongue by the rush of alpine flavors. The taste was balanced and herbal. After water had been added there were absolutely no overpowering flavors. The unification of flavors made it difficult to pick out what may have been any ingredients outside the generic Pontarlier recipe. The lingering quality on the palate lasted forever! Much longer than any commercial or clandestine out there. If there were a commercial absinthe available that tasted like Pernod Fils I would drink it exclusively! Yum!

OVERALL IMPRESSION 10/10
I am glad that I had the chance to sample vintage Pernod Fils. It was much different than I had imagined and I will say that there is nothing out there like it.

Total 98/100
Deluge
I wish I could find my Tarragona pics! frusty.gif
Jaded Prole
Thanks for the great discriptive reviews. I doubt that I will ever have the opportunity to sample preban Pernod fils so at least I can do so vicariously
through the experience of lucky bastids, I mean, more fortunate folks.

One can only hope that someone can recreate Pernod fils in the future.
Lord Stanley
QUOTE (Deluge @ May 13 2005, 04:00 PM)
I wish I could find my Tarragona pics! frusty.gif

I'll take a few photos the next time I delve into my dwindling Tarragona. I didn't think about doing an official review but it's not a bad idea after seeing the ones that you did. Nice work, Deluge.
jmfranc
QUOTE (Lord Stanley @ May 13 2005, 07:19 PM)
QUOTE (Deluge @ May 13 2005, 04:00 PM)
I wish I could find my Tarragona pics! frusty.gif

I'll take a few photos the next time I delve into my dwindling Tarragona. I didn't think about doing an official review but it's not a bad idea after seeing the ones that you did. Nice work, Deluge.

Pictures look great. Wanted to do something similar.
Azimuth
Just got my sample of the Edouard and was going to do the same..bravo...nicely done... abs-cheers.gif
Hiram
I found a substantial taste and aroma of coriander in the Edouard, and those who tasted it with me pretty much agreed. There were some very unusual tastes and aromas in it that forced me to think outside the box in terms of what we know goes into absinthe: maple and marjoram in the fragrance and celery in the finish.
Artemis
I've been told by someone who should know that there is an ingredient in that old stuff, in fact, common to surviving examples of DIFFERENT brands of old stuff, not mentioned in any of the texts we treasure.
Azimuth
Maple...definitely..I haven't tasted it yet (waiting for my bottle of Jade Eddie to come in for comparison,) but maple is one of the overwhelming scents that comes out as soon as the bottle is opened. My wife says it smells like sweet Nyquil and looks like a particularly nasty urine sample...sigh... wacko.gif

Curious...did you try any w/out sugar?
Hiram
Nope, it was sugared. I had a tiny taste neat, but it was pretty much useless.
QUOTE
I've been told  ... there is an ingredient in that old stuff, in fact, common to surviving examples of DIFFERENT brands of old stuff, not mentioned in any of the texts we treasure.
After tasting the Edouard, I wouldn't find that surprising. It was quite educational.
Deluge
For good measure...

Pernod Tarragona: ca. 1950

COLOR BEFORE WATER 7/10
The pale yellowish green color of the Tarragona seemed to be natural enough, but all in all I found it to be nothing spectacular.

LOUCHE ACTION 7/10
I felt that the Tarragona’s louche lacked the finesse noted in either the vintage Edouard or Pernod; the rapid louche seemed to have more in common with modern absinthes and pastis that use an excessive amount of badiane in their composition. The final stage of the louche was very opaque yet it was certainly not as thick as either the Edouard or the Pernod.

COLOR AFTER WATER 7/10
The color was nice enough, a rather pale opalescent green…

AROMA 23/30
The aroma neat was a bit harsh, straightforward and still packed a lot of heat. The nose vaguely reminded me of the LeMercier products; a lot of anise, some notes of fennel and hyssop, the wormwood was also noticeable but it seemed rather subdued. The aroma did not contain the complexity, mellowness, or dusky nature that either pre-ban had in abundance. After adding water the aroma improved. The harsh qualities that I previously mentioned subsided to reveal a pleasant enough bouquet that was well balanced and fresh.

MOUTH-FEEL 6/10
The mouth feel had the all too familiar pointed presence of badiane. This mouth numbing presence was noticeable at the first sip and never subsided.

TASTE 15/20
Tasting the Tarragona neat was again nothing extraordinary. The balance of herbs was well done and other than the presence of badiane I found nothing to be obtrusive or out of place. The flavor of the Tarragona was nothing at all like pre-ban Pernod Fils or Edouard Pernod. I found the flavor of the Taragonna to be somewhat similar to the LeMercier products, modern Pernod 68 and to a lesser degree modern Oxygenee.


OVERALL IMPRESSION 7/10
I found the Tarragona to be pleasant but a bit of a let down compared to the Pernod Fils and Edouard Pernod. It is no wonder Hemmingway mentioned that there was indeed a difference between the two. I’ve heard that the older bottles of Tarragona were much more similar to vintage Pernod, sadly the Tarragona of the 1950’s is not. If I were to see a bottle surface online at $250-500 I might be somewhat interested for historical purposes, anything above that I would easily pass by.

Total 72/100
thegreenimp
QUOTE (Hiram @ May 15 2005, 04:14 PM)
Nope, it was sugared. I had a tiny taste neat, but it was pretty much useless.
QUOTE
I've been told  ... there is an ingredient in that old stuff, in fact, common to surviving examples of DIFFERENT brands of old stuff, not mentioned in any of the texts we treasure.
After tasting the Edouard, I wouldn't find that surprising. It was quite educational.

There is a similiar rumor about a vintage domestic product.
Artemis
Hell, that's only viagra.
dr_ordinaire
QUOTE (Deluge @ May 16 2005, 01:01 PM)

OVERALL IMPRESSION 7/10
I found the Tarragona to be pleasant but a bit of a let down compared to the Pernod Fils and Edouard Pernod. It is no wonder Hemmingway mentioned that there was indeed a difference between the two. I’ve heard that the older bottles of Tarragona were much more similar to vintage Pernod, sadly the Tarragona of the 1950’s is not.

There may be an explanation for the difference between the Tarragona in 1918 and the Tarragona of 1960.

42 years. The Tarragona of 1918 tastes like vintage Pernod because the Tarragona WAS Pernod. It was made at a factory established by Pernod, with the Pernod recipes and Pernod know-how.

This factory was mainly for export to people used to the French Pernod. Just moving it to Spain was a strike against Pernod (Spain being a boring country, at the time. As far as arts, just literature...and not many people spoke Spanish.)

A change of taste would have been suicidal. You can bet that Pernod busted their collective tushy making the Tarragona an EXACT copy.

And it's hardly likely that they would change things with the years. Manufacturers are very careful about consistency. Changes lose old customers without necessarily enticing new ones.

We all know that absinthe improves with a little aging, imagine what 100 years will do. It may turn into the Olympic elyxir of the Gods described here.

It may also be very different from fresh-out-of-the-oven Pernod in 1910.

It may be that the Tarragona scores less points because it is actually closer to the original taste of Pernod.

If original Pernod had been something that exquisite, somebody must have mentioned it. Especially Pernod.


Somewhat related: I found a website that offers (or did as of Sept. 04) samples of Tarragona 1950 ($ 145.00/50 mL) and Un Emile 1950. ($ 160.00/50 mL) They say this is the only bottle in existence, an affirmation that I believe is about to be shot down...

www.finestandrarest.com



Lord Stanley
Deja vu. That website looks familiar.
Gertz
QUOTE (dr_ordinaire @ Aug 7 2005, 10:12 PM)
Somewhat related: I found a website that offers (or did as of Sept. 04) samples of Tarragona 1950 ($ 145.00/50 mL) and Un Emile 1950. ($ 160.00/50 mL) They say this is the only bottle in existence, an affirmation that I believe is about  to be shot down...

www.finestandrarest.com

"They" call it a possibly unique bottle.

Didn't you, by the way, notice who "they" are? If the layout of the site didn't strike you immediately as familiar, there is a copyright note at the very bottom.

Edit: LS beat me to it ...
Head_prosthesis
YOU'RE THE DUKE!
PAHPAHPAHP!!!
DUKE A' NEW YORK!!!
PAHPAHPAHPAHPAHPAHP!!!!
You're A-number one!
zachM
Sister site usually gives it away. wacko.gif
Absomphe
Snake...Snake...Snake....... LARS!.gif
Oxygenee
QUOTE (dr_ordinaire @ Aug 8 2005, 12:12 AM)
Somewhat related: I found a website that offers (or did as of Sept. 04) samples of Tarragona 1950 ($ 145.00/50 mL) and Un Emile 1950. ($ 160.00/50 mL) They say this is the only bottle in existence, an affirmation that I believe is about  to be shot down...

www.finestandrarest.com

Both these sample bottles have long since been sold - this was a mirror listing from my Virtual Absinthe Museum site, and I'd completely forgotten to update the page.

At the time of the original listing the 1950 Emile was the only one of its kind I could trace, but I've subsequently seen at least one other bottle.
Oxygenee
QUOTE (dr_ordinaire @ Aug 8 2005, 12:12 AM)
There may be an explanation for the difference between the Tarragona in 1918 and the Tarragona of 1960.

42 years.  The Tarragona of 1918 tastes like vintage Pernod because the Tarragona WAS Pernod.  It was made at a factory established by Pernod, with the Pernod recipes and Pernod know-how.

From: Error Checking Department (Dedicated Dr Ordinaire Division)

Hemingway (and others) were already pointing out the superiority of pre-ban Pernod to the Tarragona product in the late 1920's and early 1930's, so the decline in quality happened very soon.

QUOTE
This factory was mainly for export to people used to the French Pernod. 

The factory produced mainly for local consumption in Spain, and for export to the UK, neither of which had been particularly big markets for pre-ban Pernod.

QUOTE
And it's hardly likely that they would change things with the years.   Manufacturers are very careful about consistency.  Changes lose old customers without necessarily enticing new ones.


By the 1950's, Pernod Tarragona was categorically NOT made exactly according to the pre-ban recipe and protocols. The obvious taste of star anise is just one of the noticable changes.

QUOTE
We all know that absinthe improves with a little aging, imagine what 100 years will do.  It may turn into the Olympic elyxir of the Gods described here.


Absinthe does mellow with age, but it doesn't fundamentally change character or herbal composition. An inferior absinthe with a century of ageing will taste like an old inferior absinthe.
le Gimp
And a quality absinthe will taste like a quality aged absinthe?
Oxygenee
If it's been properly stored, yes.
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