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Provenance
Mr. Breaux hits the silver screen in the 12 minute movie "am+brotos." Shown at Cannes last year.

QUOTE
Layne's film features scenes with T.A. Breaux, a microbiologist who became interested in the role of absinthe in history. Breaux bought the stills of a 19th-century distillery and is now distilling absinthe in France.

Breaux was living in New Orleans when Layne interviewed him and his home in the city was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina.

Layne now says “am+brotos” - named for the phonetic spelling of ambrosia, a mythical immortality nectar of the Greek gods - “serves as a sentimental artifact” of pre-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans, in addition to being a study of absinthe.

Layne first became interested in absinthe, which is banned for sale in the United States but can be imported here, years ago after exposure to it in literature and art. He later was fascinated with the Old Absinthe House bar, which has stood on Bourbon Street in New Orleans - once the absinthe capitol of North America - since 1810.

“Everyone from Walt Whitman to Mark Twain - everyone that's anyone - has visited the Old Absinthe House sometime during their life,” he said.

Layne, a wine consultant who buys fine wines for Chuck's Wine and Spirits and is wine director at The Cellar on College Street, wanted to explore the history of absinthe because it's played such a big role in the history of art.

Van Gogh, Degas and Toulouse-Lautrec were just a few of the artists who used it as a muse.

Now, Layne hopes those who see his work will see a “sublimity to the film that you really don't see in art anymore.”

“Aesthetic commitment is really rare in the modern cinema,” he said, and his film is “nostalgic.”

“am+brotos” was filmed completely during New Orleans' “green hour,” or L' Heure Verte, when French workers traditionally headed to bars and cafes after work.

“I know most artists have heard of absinthe and are intrigued by it, and I think the rest are ... people who have different ideas of it, that it's something bad. But it's not at all.”

According to Lynn Robertson, gallery director at the Capitol, when absinthe was so popular in 19th-century art, it was considered to be “very highly addictive and caused people to go mad.”

Now, she thinks the offbeat subject matter will fit well in the Capitol's desire to show a variety of artwork.

Absomphe
Imagine that!

And Ted's normally so introverted, and reclusive.

shock.gif




Steve
Interesting. By the way, it's always nice if you reference your quote, or make it clickable.
Provenance
With apologies. From the January 4th, Bowling Green Daily News.
speedle
Hmmm...the link to nowhere.

Additionally, what year are we saying was "last year"? Logically of course, you mean 2006. Yet my search of web pages related to the 2006 Cannes Festival reveals zip so far about this film, and thus, I am frustrated. frusty.gif

Always wanted to use that little bugger somewhere.
Provenance
The problem with links to news articles is that they often expire. Perhaps this one will continue to work for a while. In case not, the following is the complete story -- including the journalist's email address if you wish to contact her.
QUOTE
Cannes film to play Friday

By ALICIA CARMICHAEL, The Daily News, acarmichael@bgdailynews.com
Thursday, January 4, 2007 10:50 AM CST

In May, Blake Layne of Bowling Green showed his 12-minute film “am+brotos” at the Cannes Film Festival.

“It was the thrill of a lifetime,” he said of the showing of the piece he created with Brandt Wicke of Los Angeles at the world-renowned French event.

Now Bowling Green can see it too: A reception will kick off an exhibit of the film from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Capitol Arts Center. The film discusses the green liquor absinthe, while art inspired by the film, by Bowling Green's C. David Jones, will be on display.

“The more he told me about it and I saw it, I wanted people here to see it as well,” Jones said. “So I applied for a new works show down at the Capitol.”

The exhibit will run through Jan. 22.

Layne's film features scenes with T.A. Breaux, a microbiologist who became interested in the role of absinthe in history. Breaux bought the stills of a 19th-century distillery and is now distilling absinthe in France.

Breaux was living in New Orleans when Layne interviewed him and his home in the city was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina.

Layne now says “am+brotos” - named for the phonetic spelling of ambrosia, a mythical immortality nectar of the Greek gods - “serves as a sentimental artifact” of pre-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans, in addition to being a study of absinthe.

Layne first became interested in absinthe, which is banned for sale in the United States but can be imported here, years ago after exposure to it in literature and art. He later was fascinated with the Old Absinthe House bar, which has stood on Bourbon Street in New Orleans - once the absinthe capitol of North America - since 1810.

“Everyone from Walt Whitman to Mark Twain - everyone that's anyone - has visited the Old Absinthe House sometime during their life,” he said.

Layne, a wine consultant who buys fine wines for Chuck's Wine and Spirits and is wine director at The Cellar on College Street, wanted to explore the history of absinthe because it's played such a big role in the history of art.

Van Gogh, Degas and Toulouse-Lautrec were just a few of the artists who used it as a muse.

Now, Layne hopes those who see his work will see a “sublimity to the film that you really don't see in art anymore.”

“Aesthetic commitment is really rare in the modern cinema,” he said, and his film is “nostalgic.”

“am+brotos” was filmed completely during New Orleans' “green hour,” or L' Heure Verte, when French workers traditionally headed to bars and cafes after work.

“I know most artists have heard of absinthe and are intrigued by it, and I think the rest are ... people who have different ideas of it, that it's something bad. But it's not at all.”

According to Lynn Robertson, gallery director at the Capitol, when absinthe was so popular in 19th-century art, it was considered to be “very highly addictive and caused people to go mad.”

Now, she thinks the offbeat subject matter will fit well in the Capitol's desire to show a variety of artwork.

“It's just slightly different, and we like to do something (like that) once in a while,” she said. “A couple years ago we had Kristina Arnold's installation in here, with the things hanging and bubble wrap on the floor, and people were intrigued by it. People would see it from the window and come in and look at it. ... It's not where you'd like to live, but you'd like to visit once in a while. ... That's how I feel about the absinthe film and the drawings and paintings. ... Video is the future, and we need to be able to do some of it.”

Refreshments will be served and “am+brotos” will be playing throughout the exhibit's opening in the Capitol's Houchens Gallery.

At the same time, art from the Country Peddler's “Design An Ad” competition for local junior high and high school students will be shown upstairs in the Capitol's Mezzanine Gallery.

Other exhibits at the Capitol this year include:

Jan. 26 through Feb. 18 - Scholastic Arts competition, featuring art created by southcentral Kentucky junior high and high school students

Feb. 23 through March 19 - Bowling Green-Warren County Youth art exhibit of works by kindergartners through sixth-graders

March 22 through April 13 - Exhibit of photographic collages by Nashville artist Kensuke Nakamura and paintings by Bowling Green artist Andee Rudloff

April 15 through May 1 - The Medical Center's Women in the Arts Exhibit

May 4 through May 29 - State Street Artists' exhibit to include art by those who live on the street - including Jones and Fleur Whitaker - or in the surrounding neighborhood

June 1 through June 25 - Exhibit of paintings by Mike Nichols of Bowling Green and sculpture by Jason Lascu of Nashville

June 29 through July 23 - Exhibit of paintings by Rachel Clark and sculpture by Charles Hurst, both of Bowling Green

July 27 through Aug. 20 - Showing of paintings by Mitchell Chamberlain of Nashville and Gerald Rose of Bowling Green

Aug. 2 through Sept. 10 - Exhibit of works by Kittner Group, Paducah artists

- For more information about art at the Capitol, call 782-2787
Stroller
QUOTE(Absomphe @ Jan 4 2007, 05:23 PM) *

Imagine that!

And Ted's normally so introverted, and reclusive.

shock.gif



HA!

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