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The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > Absinthe & Absinthiana > Absinthe Brands Discussion
Marc
From Alandia
"Neuzeller Absinthes are distilled in the Neuzeller Klosterbrauerei which reachs back to a tradtion of more than 400 years. It was founded in 1589 and since then in pure handwork fine liquors are produced. A new addition to their selection are the naturally colored Absinthes. Besides the normal herbs, such as wormwood and anise, every Absinthe is colored with a special flower or herb to give him his unique taste and appearance. Artificial colorings are not the way a traditional distillery would go, so these Absinthes are unique in taste and appearance."

Colored with rose, malvales or calendula

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Nice decanters but I'm really wondering about the taste blink.gif
My curiosity could push me to try them all though.
Any guinea pig still alive here ?
hartsmar
I considered it.

But one thing in particular (among many) put me off...
Why do they insist on leaving stuff behind in the bottle?! Who needs rose petals in the bottle?! WHY?

Here, if you buy an entire keg we'll throw in a large rose bush for you. Hell, buy a large enough barrel and we include the garden! soil and all. FUCK!
Provenance
QUOTE(mthuilli @ Mar 2 2007, 11:45 AM) *

I'm really wondering about the taste

I'm not.
hartsmar
Looking at their site it says nothing at all about making anything except beers.
http://www.klosterbrauerei.com/page.php
Provenance
And not very good beers at that. From BeerAdvocate.com on Klosterbrauerei Kirsch:
QUOTE
Taste is very sweet cherries and vlierbessen dominate and next to that some malts but again not of freshest. Strange and unbalanced mouthfeel and drinkable for some maybe but certainly not me.

QUOTE
There's a very sweet cherry taste, not tart or sour, just fanta-like sweet. I detect very few beer characteristics, although the aftertaste coaxes out a hint of bready maltiness. Cherry overwhelms everything though, and it's watery cherry.



Wild Bill Turkey
Clicking on that "New at Alandia" link also brought me to the "Good Mother", a new absinthe from France?
Anyone know about this? It looks like the same bottle and color as Verte de Fougerolles...

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Bruno Rygseck
Great, the flag of Finland on the label! Must buy.

True, the bottle looks exactly like a VdF/BdF bottle... interesting. I did not know about this, thanks for the info.

Alyssa Dyane
I would be interested to tried the flowered-up stuff, but mostly because I am a sucker for rose-flavoured things. Weird, I know.
Steve
I also love rose flavor, but calendula? shock.gif het.gif
Heure Verte
QUOTE(Bruno Rygseck @ Mar 2 2007, 01:53 PM) *

Great, the flag of Finland on the label! Must buy.


Hu, no ! This blue cross is the coat of arms of the city of Marseille, France. That's because it's an absinthe produced by Paul Devoille for a cavist from Marseille, selling pastis and absinthes. He wanted to create a drink between pastis and absinthe : it tastes a lot star anise.

I guess Un Emile Rouge gave the idea to Alandia to create red absinthes, colored with flowers ? Didn't taste it but some belgians on the french forum had this absinthes at Floris bar. Seems ok to them.
Esseintes
Tasted it last month. The formulaes are not bad, but the herbs don't seem to be that spectacular. My overall impression is rather thin. Using flowers in Absinthe always bares the danger of a soapy taste - in my oppinion they got a pretty good balance.
Wild Bill Turkey
You have a great Balance. When you going to sell it in litre bottles?
Jaded Prole
The Balance is very good.
Steyr850
Tis true.
Provenance
I may be the only one quite unimpressed with the Balance.
Jaded Prole
I think it's one of the best commercials but it's no L'Artisinale.
Steyr850
'Zactly.

Not to diminish its quality, which I think is good, butt one must also consider its value.

I'm interested in your take Provenance.
Provenance
I don't care to be disrespectful to what is obviously a serious attempt at a quality budget absinthe. Such efforts are deserving of respect and Markus has marketed and priced the Balance as a moderately-priced alternative to the Duplais verte; a completely honorable approach to the product. The Balance is not bad, just mediocre. It lacks complexity and depth and is not close to being at the quality level of Pernod Fils Moderne.
Steyr850
I hope you didn't feel as though I was goading you. I was honestly interested in your opinion.
Provenance
Goaded? I thought you simply asking for my views on a popular absinthe. I'm honored that you would be interested.
Esseintes
We were already discussing this (1.0l bottles), so maybe in a few weeks...
Communikaze
I have quite a lot of classic absinthes, and I would like to have something out of the ordinary for myself and for my guests. I have tried to introduce others to drinking absinthe. personally i won´t rate thes absinthes according to how close they are to top-absinthes when it comes to authenticity and classic traits. I take the overall experience - do I like it or not? Would I drink it again? Would I serve it to anyone else?

I have a bottle of Neuzeller Calendula and I must say that I don´t regret that I bought it. Most likely I will buy the one with red Roses for the girls and I am interested in their Verte as well. Yes, It IS a perfumed experience, where the calendula-flowers are quite dominant, some might say the impression "soapy". However the louche and mouthfeel is quite allright and the taste is somewhat complex. I prefer to spice this one with sugar to get the candylike taste and I really enjoy it. On a regular basis i prefer classic stuff, but I´m glad that I have this addition to my collection and to the guests that stops by even the slightest taste of liqurice or anis. The only major flaw is that is it a bit expensive (35 EUR / 0.5 litres). I have also tried out the Neuzeller "Neue Liebe" (with roses) when I was in Hamburg. At the time I was a newbie and to be honest a bit drunk. How ever I recall that it was a pleasant experience.

I believe the Neuzeller ranges should be reviewed along with other absinthes such as L´italliene (´which i prefer with sugar). L´italliene reminds me of a candytaste from what we call "Althea-bonbons" here in Denmark - a mix between oranges and bergamot oil (as in Earl grey tea). I can sense the good craftmanship and classic herbal trinity beneath the althea-taste but this absinthe is clearly away from the classic absinth palette. Still, it is refreshing and very interesting indeed and quite popular according to the posts within this forum.

As mentioned in my introductory post, I held a local tasting event with Gertz and one of my less fanatic friends. We tried PF 1914, L'Artisinale, Jade Edouard, Jade Nouvelle Orleans, Clandestine Recette Marianne, Clandestine Charlotte (wine base), Twin Tec bikers medicine, Combier Blanchette, L´italliene, Neuzeller Calendula, Maitresse Rouge among others. I recall that Gertz tried out the Neuzeller Calendula and found it interesting. He did survive eventhough we had a "King of Spirits experience" with "Erste Absinth Depot Berlin Hausmarkt" (it had a citrus note and was incredibly bitter, shortly after I poured it out over a bush beneath the balcony - it must be gone by now). Our powers of judgement might have been a bit blurry at the time, and the lineup was quite impressive… still, I recall that Gertz found the Neuzeller Calendula interesting and not horrible at all… perhaps he will add a comment…

Bottom line: For the collectors the would like to introduce their guests to a wider experience or add a little extra to the party I would recommend a flower absinthe or two. They are great fun. I believe that the flower absinthes makes out a funny and refreshing experience as long as they are well made, for some they might even be a introduction to the classic absinthes.

In case any of you have tried out any absinthe oddities with an overall good taste experience I would like to hear recommendations. Perhaps I should dare to write my first review on the Neuzeller Calendula….
Communikaze
QUOTE(Thomas Boston @ Sep 23 2008, 12:14 AM) *

I have quite a lot of classic absinthes, and I would like to have something out of the ordinary for myself and for my guests. I have tried to introduce others to drinking absinthe.


Sorry for the ½ sentence, let me add this:

…and appearantly not all share the taste for this lovely drink even though it is of high quality. In example i have seen people sipping to a perfectly made glas of e.g. Duplais Balance, Clandestine, Twin Tec, Mansinthe just to leave the glass for the rest of the evening saying that it just tastes like Pernod. I respect that, If you don´t like it don´t drink it. But sometimes I must restrain myself from seeing such people as uninformed peasants, while I - the green Count is the only person with the slightest sense for the finer things in life.
I recall that I went to this party with som Clandestine and a girl said that it tasted like "pastiche" and then she made a "drink" of red soda and cheap gin, my, my… Take that, Bugnon wink.gif.

My point was: a pink, yellow or orange glas of Neuzeller flower absinth might do the trick and make people curious for the good ol´ classic stuff enjoyed by the rest of us.

In november I will attend to a theater event in Copenhagen where I will have to make a small absinth bar for the evening. I will definately recoommend the place to posess a couple of "oddities". Again, any recommendations?
OCvertDe
Start with making it an absinthe bar.
Montmartre and Eichelberger 68 are both quite tasty yet unique, a few ticks away from the "classic" flavors usually associated with traditional absinthe. Both relatively inexpensive too, compared to say, selections from Emile Pernot or T. A. Breaux.
Communikaze
QUOTE(OCvertDe @ Sep 23 2008, 01:12 PM) *

Start with making it an absinthe bar.
Montmartre and Eichelberger 68 are both quite tasty yet unique, a few ticks away from the "classic" flavors usually associated with traditional absinthe. Both relatively inexpensive too, compared to say, selections from Emile Pernot or T. A. Breaux.


Sorry for the missing "e". In Denmark it is never pronounced with the e. As a matter of fact it is also spelled as "Absint". I regularly forget the e. Yes, Eichelberger (Limitee) and Montmartre are also quite different from the norm. I have the first edition of Montmartre and it has a very distinct cinnamon/coriander flavor - it may be a challenge to newcomers. I salute the project and look forward to taste the later variations.

I must say that I have only tried the Eichelberger Limitee Verte, it has a promising clean fresh taste - I will definately try out the others.

Serpis 65 is worthwile trying for anis/liquorice lovers and the taste will most likely not convince the "Absinthe is Pastis" segment. Mansinthe and La Coquette also has an edge, but the again, I belive you have to appreciate absinth in general to enjoy these.

When it comes to classics I belive the Marteau is a good introduction to verte. Very mild and fullbodied. I have also suceeded with the Valot Bovet where I add sugar and dilute a bit more. Yes, I know… La bleues should be enjoyed without, but I think this one lacks something and gets a fuller, rounded, smooth expression - especially girls tend to like this one =).

But "how to seduce a beginner guide", thats another thread (sorry for going off the track).

Neuzeller and Pernot´s Maitresse Rouge are the only high quality flowercoloured stuff that I know. Maitresse is a very good absinthe according to my taste but it is nowhere near the perfumed expression in the two Neuzeller I have tried.
Donnie Darko
Why the bold letters on the product name?
Communikaze
QUOTE(Donnie Darko @ Sep 23 2008, 03:13 PM) *

Why the bold letters on the product name?


Because I thought i would be easier to look out information on the original brand disussed in this thread.

The subject was flower absinthes and the thread initially started with a discussion of the Neuzeller range, seems like i turned out as discussion of traditional absinthes. In case somebody was browsing the correspondance i think it would be helpful to quickly locate the original subject. Hopefully I have not broken some sort of forum etiquette?
Donnie Darko
No, not at all. I have sensitive spammer radar, it's usually a technique spammers use but you're buddies with Gertz so you're cool with me. Didn't mean to seem like I was criticizing. Plus Denmark is on the top of my list of countries to visit. My co-worker is from there and everybody tells me I would love Copenhagen.

As for how to seduce a beginner, in my experience they seem to like blanches better than vertes. Based on how bottles I've brought to parties have emptied, I've found that Clandestine and Kubler empty really fast, and the Lucid emptied faster than the Doubs Mystique, which is fine by me since I'd rather have some Mystique left to take home as it is by far the best absinthe of those 4. But I think "simple" is what people who are new go for most, although ones with peculiar flavor profiles seem to be a favorite, in particular the Eichelberger Verte. I know 3 different people who aren't really a fan of anise who love the Eichelberger.

I suppose it's the same with most booze. For a Whisky example, I know girls who really like Balvenie or Macallan, but if I give them Lagavulin or Laphroaig they generally say "what the hell is this crap?", even though those are consistently scored higher than the Balvenie in reviews.
Communikaze
Glad to hear that. Seems like we have to open a dedicated Absinthe bar here in Copenhagen before you get there and before someone without the proper knowledge/passion does. The most exclusive brand in Dk bars available is Pernod 68. A visit is highly recommended in the summertime since we are in excess of beautiful women. I already imagine the opening night and the combination of green bodypaint, yellow contact lenses, fairy wings and a couple of local beauties….and…

Oh, sorry… I was dreaming…. I will probably order another Neuzeller flower absinthe for the fun of it and write a decent review. Perhaps Gertz will join. First thing I´ll do after Pontarlier.
OCvertDe
QUOTE(Donnie Darko @ Sep 23 2008, 12:34 PM) *

As for how to seduce a beginner, in my experience they seem to like blanches better than vertes.

Agreed. While most of my friends who've wanted to try absinthe were disappointed when I didn't pour them something green, I've never had a Verte received as well as a Blanche by a first timer.
Communikaze
That was my theory too, but to my surprise I had the opposite experience on several occasions. They like Verte better than La Bleue which - according to them - is "just like ouzo". Taste is individual I guess… Well, actually I plan to buy a small bottle of ouzo just for comparison.

Like iwth pastis… there is a huge difference between Pernod, Richard and Henri Bardouin. So when they say "it taste like pastis" - what do they mean? They mostly react on the anise and dont distinquish between star anise, green anise and plain liqeurice. Seems like most Danes I met prefere absinthe instead of pastis… But what is pastis then? Henri Bardouin is highly appreciated, but here I actually prefer Richard. Henri Bardouins aroma is way to close to a danish liquer called "Gammel Dansk" ("Old danish) which should be avoided by any means. Still the taste of HB is really good, it is the aroma I don´t like. BTW. Anyone tasted the Berger Pastis?

Back to subject: Still a sugared flower absinth might be the drink that kills the initial scepticism. Besides of the fun it is a good alternative to introduce newcomers to…
absinthist
Pernod is anis, Ricard is pastis de Marseille, HB is pastis al'ancienne. I have had Gammel Dansk but it was too sweet, whereas HB has a more of an earthy, rooty note and thus is better but I see no similarities between the two.
Communikaze
Well, there you go… Thank you for clarifying this, I really don´t know that much of these liqeurs, and should probably stick to absinthe. I must say that as a liquerice fan I enjoy them anyway, even though I don´t find the complexity I find in absinthe. Gammel Dansk. Well, you are the proof that it is actually possible to survive drinking it wink.gif
absinthist
As a chaser for Hungarian szlivapalinka several years ago it was quite good. I hear there are at least two more versions of the brand, one is kinda fruitied with rowan berries or do all contain that ingredient? Could you tell us more about? Also, I remember reading here its label is prohibited in Sweden as well.
Gertz
My memories of that flowered Neuzeller thing are a bit blurred, but at least it passed the "drink it or sink it"-test. I remember it as a nice enough drink. Nothing nasty or offensive, nothing really interesting either. I don't think I would buy a bottle, and I can't imagine a situation where there wasn't something else I'd rather drink.
Marc
I have the calendula one, I would classify it in the "sink it" category.
Absomphe
It looks a little like the flowery L'Italienne, but obviously the resemblance must end there.
Provenance
"German absinthe" is one of those phrases…sort of like "English cooking."
Absomphe
I loves me dem oxynoroms™
Communikaze
I´ll probably buy the rose absinthe for the goofyness of it. My girlfriend liked the Calendula its a 3/6 for me - nothing that will be emptied fast but drinkable and a funny addition to my collection. Neuzeller also makes a verte (Viridis Auxilliarum). According to Markus its OK, but nothing fantastic compared to the price (not the best herbs). I would like top taste it anyway and think it deserves a chance. Anybody tried it? Please let us know…
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