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The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > Absinthe & Absinthiana > Absinthe History
Grim
Hey guys and gals.

This came in not too long ago…
Grim
A closer look at the cover…
Click to view attachment
Grim
And a great example of a very clean and simple, old-school Egrot absinthe system (on the right)…
Click to view attachment
thegreenimp
Looks like they got that catalog in New Orleans too.
Click to view attachment
Grim
Dude… did you already give me that in hi-res? If not… please send it my way! That fat-ass chapiteau style, like the old eight at Combier, is something I really like.

For those who are less familiar (or not at all) with this subject… you can find info at Oxygénée's Vintage Absinthe Museum Books section I & IV.

Books I.

And… Books IV.
Marc
Nice find Grimmy, you Egrot lover!
If you need translations of some specific parts, you know where to find me wink.gif
Grim
Thanks!

None of the French is all that bad in this one (it's repeated numerous times, with slight modification in later catalogues), but with Artemis taking a very necessary pause from the game, I'll definitely be needing some assistance…

Speaking of which, Oxy, did you ever find a use for that translation I did from the Egrot & Grangé's invoice for Vichet? I sure hope not. It was craptacular.
Le Gimp
SWEET!
dakini_painter
Very nice!

Curious, did Egrot patent their designs? If so, have you spent many long nights at the French Patent Office searching for the old original drawings?
Rimbaud
Nice find, Grim!
Rimbaud
A nice scan of that page would make a rad wallpaper.
dakini_painter
If he scanned every single page, he could have Oxy post it in the books section.

Probably end up with free help on translation.
eric
Ha!
Absomphe
Yeah, I hear Oxy just loves pouring over that pre-ban froggy minutiae!
Grim
QUOTE(dakini_painter @ Jul 30 2008, 03:34 AM) *

Very nice!

Curious, did Egrot patent their designs? If so, have you spent many long nights at the French Patent Office searching for the old original drawings?

Actually, if you look to the left of the first image you'll see blueprints!

I can draw on a lot of notes I've taken in the past; measurements and diagrams of my own that I've taken from surviving systems.

It's really rare to find folks that can replicate stuff like this though. For example, take old-school brazing. It really stands out. It's usually zigzagged and very regular, nearly imperceptible on curved surfaces except by the difference in color. Good luck finding someone that can still handle a handlamp and old soldering iron. These days, the effort required to build something like these old systems is really hard to justify.

As for modern systems, Bugnon's got a really interesting set-up. That rocker system (referred to as a basculement) that allows the vessel to be levered and drained, that's really a very old feature. So's the style of brass joint or raccord on either end of the swan neck. The iron furnace that incorporates a modern gas burner is sweet as well. Surely, if I ever find who the fabricator is, I'd have MANY projects for him/her.
Balzdeep
A significant amount of heat resisitant rubber that provides a good seal with no flavor issue is awesome! I have no idea where that is, but it must be required for the rocker set-up.

However the pics are grate!
Kirk
I don't think you'll find rubber seals, metal to metal is standard, I could be wrong.
Grim
100% pure caoutchouc… natural rubber.

You'll find these types of seals in not only the chapiteau to cucurbite, the chapiteau to col-de-cygne, col-de-cygne to serpentin, but also the tampon de vidange that some of these stills were made with.

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Kirk
Interesting, thanks.
Those seals look black, natural rubber is yellow, is that a replacement?
I'm curious because I use natural rubber in my vulcaniser.
Le Gimp
Can't you take natural rubber, sulphur, and carbon black and vulcanize the mixture into something like that?
Wilson
I could be mistaken again, but that looks like a neoprene seal. The only thing I see missing is the spring.
Wilson
Speaking of which, what is wrong with a neoprene seal. It is stable in ethanol.
Grim
QUOTE(Kirk @ Aug 23 2008, 03:35 PM) *

Interesting, thanks.
Those seals look black, natural rubber is yellow, is that a replacement?
I'm curious because I use natural rubber in my vulcaniser.

Then, I should drop the "natural" part. Thanks for pointing that out.

Nope, that's the real deal. I've found gaskets in place on equipment that are so old there's barely a recognizable ring of dry debris to witness it ever existed. But always the same black rubber.
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QUOTE
Can't you take natural rubber, sulphur, and carbon black and vulcanize the mixture into something like that?

Can you? I need several gaskets made, myself. In addition to some engineering problems you'd probably be "the man" at.

QUOTE
I could be mistaken again, but that looks like a neoprene seal. The only thing I see missing is the spring…
Speaking of which, what is wrong with a neoprene seal. It is stable in ethanol.

Probably nothing. Sounds like a great idea, since it's some good inert stuff.

In addition, I know they used rubber because they state as much in the manufacturer's catalogues of the day…
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dakini_painter
How does the rubber used there compare with BUNA-N, a common gasket material make of nitrile rubber? It also has excellent resistance to alcohols. (Though I personally think EPDM is better.)
Grim
Gal, I have no earthly idea… blink.gif

but I might know who to ask.
dakini_painter
Kewl! You da man! heart.gif
Jaded Prole
That he is.
EdouardPerneau
I know back in the old days they where used to use old leather gasket I don't know if they where used in this case
Le Gimp
Ya know I think that it is interesting that we think that that organic chemistry is a modern phenomenon. However, it along with refrigeration, Anesthesia, pasteurization, and many "modern" techniques are really mid 1800s.
dr_ordinaire
QUOTE(Wilson @ Aug 23 2008, 07:24 PM) *

Speaking of which, what is wrong with a neoprene seal. It is stable in ethanol.


I would imagine silicone rubber (the stuff with which they now make oven molds and pot-holders) would be ideal, being chemically inert and very high-temp resistant.
Green Baron
I’m not knowledgeable about distilling except for what glean in absinthe forums, but I’m curious.

Was there a time frame that materials like rye paste were being phased out in favor of materials like processed rubber? Is this what Le Gimp is referring to as the result of organic chemistry in the mid 1800’s (one might be able say that our current methods of organic chemistry, refrigeration, ect. are “modern” in the sense that they are products of the Industrial Revolution)?

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