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The Fιe Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > Absinthe & Absinthiana > Absinthe Brands Discussion
Tirador
The results are out for this year's International Wine and Spirits Competition (IWSC) in London.

Gold and Best in Class - Absinthe Brevans AO (they took a Bronze at the IWSC last year)

Silver and Best in Class - Studer Absinth (they took a Silver last year as well)

Silver - Olivia Absinthe Superieure

Bronze - View Carre Absinthe Superiore (they took a Gold this year in San Francisco)

Bronze - Doubs Gold Absinthe (Oxy took Gold and best in class at the IWSC last year)

Bronze - REDUX Absinthe (our third Bronze medal this year …)

CONGRATS everyone! This is a really tough competition and from what I understand there were a substantial number of entries.
Patlow
Congrats, Rob!
Donnie Darko
What's Studer absinth?
Absomphe
I'm guessing a few of the best weren't entered.
Provenance
QUOTE(Donnie Darko @ Jul 22 2009, 09:56 AM) *

What's Studer absinth?

Proof that absinthe competitions are inane.
Patlow
They can't be as bad as advertising awards which are LITERALLY paid for. But they do often seem goofy.
absinthist
Congrats, Stephen!

QUOTE
Olivia Absinthe Superieure


Oliva the one everyone has heard of, no one tried (or maybe one person here)?

Kirk
. . .
Tirador
[quote name='absinthist' date='Jul 22 2009, 01:29 PM' post='173612']
Congrats, Stephen!

THANKS!
Esseintes
QUOTE(Tirador @ Jul 22 2009, 09:01 AM) *

The results are out for this year's International Wine and Spirits Competition (IWSC) in London.


Bronze last year was Absinthe Brevans H.R. Giger

Gold Best in class this year is Absinthe Brevans A.O. Spare

These are completely different products.
Absinthe Ben
As someone who adored Doubs Mystique, I am looking for more light to be shed on this Doubs Gold mystery. Anyone have insight on this?

QUOTE(absinthist @ Jul 22 2009, 09:29 PM) *

Congrats, Stephen!

QUOTE
Olivia Absinthe Superieure


Oliva the one everyone has heard of, no one tried (or maybe one person here)?


Likewise, a job well done on another medal Stephen. abs-cheers.gif

I tried Oliva in 2007, no idea if it has changed since then or not, though. It honestly wasn't too bad, and I would drink it again.
Shabba53
QUOTE(Absinthe Ben @ Jul 28 2009, 03:22 AM) *

As someone who adored Doubs Mystique, I am looking for more light to be shed on this Doubs Gold mystery. Anyone have insight on this?

I swear there was a topic about this somewhere. Was the Gold version the 'Southern Hemisphere' offering? Or am I thinking of something completely different?
Absomphe
Possibly.

The only 'Southern Hemisphere' offering I'm aware of is an ale brewed by Sierra Nevada.
Tibro
I think he means bottled for the Australian market, primarily. I recall seeing a thread on this at some point as well. It was either a market specific bottling or a con job, but I think it was confirmed as the former.
Wild Bill Turkey
Doubs Mystery Thread
Provenance
QUOTE(Tirador @ Jul 22 2009, 09:01 AM) *
Bronze - REDUX Absinthe (our third Bronze medal this year …)


I'm not quite sure I understand just what won the bronze (and other awards) as REDUX Absinthe isn't yet for sale. Was the product entered from the "distiller's proof" you previously mentioned that will still undergo a bit more tweaking? Part of a commercial batch that's aging? Where was it made? Not an unreasonable question for a commercial product entered in various competitions.

What equipment was used in producing the REDUX? Also a reasonable question since you are interested in and sell antique alembics. Is there a COLA?

I've been really pleased with the development of American-made absinthes and would like to know more.
Tirador
QUOTE(Provenance @ Jul 28 2009, 12:38 PM) *

QUOTE(Tirador @ Jul 22 2009, 09:01 AM) *
Bronze - REDUX Absinthe (our third Bronze medal this year …)


I'm not quite sure I understand just what won the bronze (and other awards) as REDUX Absinthe isn't yet for sale. Was the product entered from the "distiller's proof" you previously mentioned that will still undergo a bit more tweaking? Part of a commercial batch that's aging? Where was it made? Not an unreasonable question for a commercial product entered in various competitions.



This is the same "distillers proof" that was submitted for San Fran and the ISC previously. We took bronze medals at all three competitions.

This is also the same batch that the sample I sent you came from …

Entering distiller's proofs of new products into trade competitions is a common industry practice, and while I may be a tiny artisan operation (dedicated to producing Absinthe using traditional hand-crafted artisanal methods, as opposed to the mass-production methods used by the big guys), I still need to handle the business side of things in a manner that is consistant with what others in the Trade are doing, which is why entering these types of competitions has value.

I do not intend to do any more work on this formula and process until we're working on the large stills we'll be producing on, hopefully later this year. At that point REDUX Absinthe will change a bit, but only for the better. I have a feeling based upon my work to-date that, in my case, simply moving to a larger still will make REDUX Absinthe, with its current formula and processing methods, better … but I won't know for sure until we run two or three back-to-back batches on the large stills …

Oh, and just to clarify, REDUX Absinthe is an Absinthe Verte. It will likely be sold in the U.S. under the name "REDUX Absinthe Verte" as just REDUX Absinthe may not make it through TTB approval (the word Absinthe alone bothers them …). This product will be followed by other styles of Absinthe under the REDUX brand name, along with a similarly produced product containing an entirly different family of herbs and spices, that is NOT an Absinthe, and potentially a couple of Eaux De Vie just because I like making and drinking them too …
Kirk
Congratulations on the medal. I haven't been paying enough attention to what's going on.
Provenance
QUOTE(Tirador @ Aug 3 2009, 05:45 AM) *
This is also the same batch that the sample I sent you came from …

???

I think you may be confusing me with someone else.
Tibro
You sure you haven't confused yourself with someone else?
Provenance
Again?
Donnie Darko
QUOTE(Tirador @ Aug 3 2009, 09:45 AM) *

(dedicated to producing Absinthe using traditional hand-crafted artisanal methods, as opposed to the mass-production methods used by the big guys),


What exactly does you mean when you say "hand-crafted artisanal methods" and "mass-production methods"?

Are you speaking of 10L alambic instead of a 1000L alambic? Are you speaking of dumping a sack of pre-prepared herbs into a still vs. hand stripping each individual plant?

I'm just curious because from what I understand, the only way to make good or traditional absinthe is pretty much the same whether one is talking about a large scale or a small scale (allowing for minor tweaks to compensate for nuances that come with large volumes, of course). If you're differentiating yourself from Big Guys like Pernod who just throw essences into ethanol and then artificially color, then I understand you fully. But from what I know, the overwhelming majority of brands everyone in here likes are all made using "hand-crafted artisanal methods". Pernod Fils was a massive factory with tremendous output, and plenty of their process was assisted by machinery (i.e. heating, cooling, coloring, diverting distillate to aging containers), and their absinthe was delicious.

I guess if one is to promote their absinthe, they need to make it sound special and distinct somehow, so I guess what can one say aside from "it's hand crafted in an artisanal manner"?
dakini_painter
QUOTE
I guess if one is to promote their absinthe, they need to make it sound special and distinct somehow, so I guess what can one say aside from "it's hand crafted in an artisanal manner"?


I'm stumped.

Part of the problem are TTB advertising rules restricting producers and distributors from making "comparative claims". So words such as "hand-crafted" or "artisanal" or "small batch" get used to distinguish oneself from other producers. In the whiskey world "batch distilled" and "pot still" get used to distinguish themselves from large Tennessee whiskey producers without mentioning the latter by name.

The real challenge will come when you actually begin selling the product. That terminology may help get you in the door to talk to someone, but the product has to speak well of itself and you have to be able to do a lot more to sell the product. Especially when most people have no clue how to properly serve it; one the rocks with a splash of water is not one of them. blink.gif
Donnie Darko
Yeah, you had mentioned before that most bartenders can't figure out how to dilute it, and you're right that it's a big problem almost everywhere. I like the service at L'Absinthe best here. They just hand you a fountain, but if you ask them to show you how to do it they're very conscientious about not over-diluting it, usually pour it between 3 and 4:1 and then let you add more if you want. Everywhere else I've ordered an absinthe at in the city though, they fucked it up, usually by under-watering (which at least you can fix if you ask for a glass of iced water on the side). I imagine PDT, Pegu club and Little Branch do it right, but I've never ordered a plain absinthe from them. Since they're all so good at cocktails I thought it would be a waste of money to buy a $15 glass of absinthe that's just absinthe and water when you can get them to make an awesome cocktail for less than that.
dakini_painter
I can't figure out the pricing for an absinthe and water yet as you say when there's other cocktails that are cheaper and really quite good. Is that part of absinthes' bad-booze image?

Hideout has a fountain, and also knows how to prepare absinthe even with just adding water. They often still underwater it a little, but 3:1 isn't a bad ratio.

Sorry, looks like I derailed the 2009 IWSC thread. evill.gif
Donnie Darko
I think the pricing is the product of absinthe costing >$60 a bottle. Most cocktail elements don't cost that much. Good gin, vodka, bourbon and rum, which are the most common cocktail bases, are all mostly much less expensive.
Wild Bill Turkey
Yeah, but to make a cocktail, you have to combine several components.

Figuring a 750ml bottle to render 25 1oz (3cl) doses, the pour cost per 1oz dose/serving of absinthe is $2.40 to pay for a $60 bottle. Or $3.20 if you prefer a 4cl serving.

Your Pegu Club cocktail:
2ozs good gin, $28-$29 per 750ml bottle: 2ozs @ $1.15/oz= $2.30
1oz Cointreau, $40 per 750ml bottle: 1oz @ $1.60/oz= $1.60
Even if I throw in the lime juice and bitters for free the cocktail still has a higher pour cost at $3.90.
Shabba53
edit: WBT beat me to it.

Also keep in mind that most absinthe cocktails only use a minute amount. You could probably get 100 Sazeracs out of one bottle of absinthe.
Patlow
Talk about shitty absinthe service…

At a place in Philadelphia, Zinc Bar (what I thought was a reputable little French bistro), they have replaced the Lucid absinthe with Kubler absinthe (These are the only "two" options they have.).

I mean like they filled the Lucid bottle with Kubler, so when you ask for a Lucid you get a Kubler.

I guess they don't think people know that Lucid is a verte, or GREEN. I can't imagine why they would ever do this, but they did it!

I had dinner reservations there until this happened at the bar beforehand. I walked out. There was no use trying to explain the problem to the girl tending bar.
Provenance
QUOTE(Patlow @ Aug 5 2009, 06:21 AM) *
I mean like they filled the Lucid bottle with Kubler, so when you ask for a Lucid you get a Kubler.

Too cool! Anyone who orders either gets what they deserve. 'course they could get their license pulled for that.

You gotta wonder what other substitutions they made that may not be as visually obvious.
Donnie Darko
Yeah, like subbing 12 year old Oak Macallan into an 18 year Macallan bottle. Cha-ching!
Patlow
It must happen so much.
Provenance
QUOTE(Donnie Darko @ Aug 5 2009, 08:01 AM) *
Yeah, like subbing Mr. Boston Canadian into an 18 year Macallan bottle. Cha-ching!
G&C
After all, who would notice?
Provenance
Not anyone who considers Lucid to be drinkable.
Funky D
Once you get to the 5th or 6th glass, anything is drinkable…
G&C
Um, no.
Tirador
I agree with you … most of the Absinthes this crowd likes would be hand-crafted using traditional methods … and as you say Pernod Fils back in the day was a massive factory … but they used what compated to modern mass-distillation practices were "artisan" production techniques. Practices that were far more hands-on and labor intensive then what most major liquor producers do today. They also produced in much smaller batches …

There are a number of large producers today, and Pernod is just one of them, that are either producing or will soon be, mass-produced Absinthe using a variety processes that most in this forum would not approve of …

As for how I discribe my product, remember that I am discribing it for the general consumer who knows very little about Absinthe, not a bunch of folks like us …

Having said that, I've spent years studying how small-batch absinthe was made 100-150 years ago, and yes I am working very hard to replicate artisan production methods from the late 1800s, as are various other members of this and other similar forums. Sorry if that bothers you …

S.

QUOTE(Donnie Darko @ Aug 3 2009, 12:43 PM) *

QUOTE(Tirador @ Aug 3 2009, 09:45 AM) *

(dedicated to producing Absinthe using traditional hand-crafted artisanal methods, as opposed to the mass-production methods used by the big guys),


What exactly does you mean when you say "hand-crafted artisanal methods" and "mass-production methods"?

Are you speaking of 10L alambic instead of a 1000L alambic? Are you speaking of dumping a sack of pre-prepared herbs into a still vs. hand stripping each individual plant?

I'm just curious because from what I understand, the only way to make good or traditional absinthe is pretty much the same whether one is talking about a large scale or a small scale (allowing for minor tweaks to compensate for nuances that come with large volumes, of course). If you're differentiating yourself from Big Guys like Pernod who just throw essences into ethanol and then artificially color, then I understand you fully. But from what I know, the overwhelming majority of brands everyone in here likes are all made using "hand-crafted artisanal methods". Pernod Fils was a massive factory with tremendous output, and plenty of their process was assisted by machinery (i.e. heating, cooling, coloring, diverting distillate to aging containers), and their absinthe was delicious.

I guess if one is to promote their absinthe, they need to make it sound special and distinct somehow, so I guess what can one say aside from "it's hand crafted in an artisanal manner"?

Tirador
QUOTE(Provenance @ Aug 3 2009, 06:36 AM) *

QUOTE(Tirador @ Aug 3 2009, 05:45 AM) *
This is also the same batch that the sample I sent you came from …

???

I think you may be confusing me with someone else.


You're right … I was …

Sounds like I owe you a small taste.

S.
speedle
QUOTE(Provenance @ Aug 5 2009, 03:13 PM) *

Not anyone who considers Lucid to be drinkable.


I would, and I do. Just not very often. Anymore, that is.
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