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Full Version: BA2, Enjoleuse or Desiree ?
The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > Absinthe & Absinthiana > Absinthe Brands Discussion
Wolfgang
After retasting what`s left of my bottle of Belle Amie second edition, even given my limited budget, I`m thinking about buying another bottle when it`s still possible to do so.

The question is should I but another BA2 or try the Enjoleuse or the Desiree ?

I can only buy one bottle.

I've seen the reviews (in french) at heureverte.com but all looks excellent.

I couldn't find reviews for Enjoleuse or Desiree around here. Anybody tasted the whole collection of "Les Parisiennes" ?

For reference about my tastes, my ultimate absinthe was a vintage sample of Berger. I also like Jade Verte suisse and Edouard very much. I'm also impressed at how much the Belle Amie improved with extra aging. I do not like thin absinthes (like the BA1). I like it creamy, clean, floral and tasty.

Thanks for your help.
absinthist
None of these. Get some really good absinthe for a change.

QUOTE
I've seen the reviews (in french) at heureverte.com but all looks excellent.

since the owner is the maker, what do you expect the reviews to be alike?
Absomphe
What Pot/Kettle said.
Patlow
I like Boggy, but man did he walk into that one…
Wolfgang
Now I remember why I don`t visit this forum as often as before.
Dpanice
QUOTE(Wolfgang @ Feb 2 2010, 01:03 PM) *

I like it creamy, clean, floral and tasty.

IPB Image

Ah, memories. abs-cheers.gif
Aggelos
QUOTE(Wolfgang @ Feb 2 2010, 08:03 PM) *

I couldn't find reviews for Enjoleuse or Desiree around here. Anybody tasted the whole collection of "Les Parisiennes" ?

For reference about my tastes, my ultimate absinthe was a vintage sample of Berger. I also like Jade Verte suisse and Edouard very much. I'm also impressed at how much the Belle Amie improved with extra aging. I do not like thin absinthes (like the BA1). I like it creamy, clean, floral and tasty.

I buy any Parisienne when it is available, since I love the work of Vert d'Absinthe.

While I reckon the maker lacks objectivity on his creations, which is only natural I guess, I think there is nothing he should be shy about. Even of french boards not affiliated with Vert d'Absinthe (thinking about museeabsinthe.com , the old oxygenee board administrated by Marc ) I've seen some pretty good reviews of la Desiree at least.

My advice would be to stay away from l'Enjoleuse, even if it's my go to absinthe currently, since you already have to be a Parisiennes lover to be curious enough to appreciate it.

Now, La Désirée, la Coquette and l'Enjoleuse (and in a lesser part soixante cinq) share similarities, mainly that is the very strong wine alcohol base and that very thick floral taste.
Many find the Devoille wine alcohol too strong for their taste, and indeed I'd advise knowing it with another Devoille absinthe (VdF, Libertine, Soixante Cinq) before buying a Devoille Parisienne.

That being said, La Désirée is, in my humble opinion, a true masterpiece. Strong and subtle, well balanced, floral, thick, it's a carpet of anise, a roof of absinthe, and a dance of fruity and herbal flavors in the middle. If the wine alcohol was a slight bit toned down, it would be the definitive killer, with absolutely no compare, methinks.
Besides, unlike another one I prefer over La Désirée (yup, it exists), you can't get wrong when preparing it : any amount of water or sugar will work and provide you with a different experience.

On a final note, I keep my advice : don't buy La Désirée or l'Enjoleuse if you don't know you like the Devoille wine alcohol. More-so because Belle Amie II will soon be extinct.

Or you could wait a few months…
absinthist
Should one insist on exploring Devoille, the fairest choice as of now is La Coquette-much different from BA, yet not that stenchy and off-putting like L'E or 65.

IMO, however, the finest thing to date Devoille shall be praised for was VdF unfiltered.

Moreover, reading the reviews of La D and having tasted L'E and 65, it looks like one takes L'E dilutes it to 65 and gets 65, accelarates its aging and gets La D. The similarities in one and each are too striking.
Wolfgang
Thank you guys.

That was the kind of comments I was looking for.

One of the reason for my hesitation I didn`t wrote about is the very unpleasant memory I have from one of the first batch of Verte de Fougerolle. I still have some of that bottle (most of it have been given to friends who where just curious to taste it and never asked for a second glass). It`s almost undrinkable.

I think someone already told me they improved the base alcool since then but based on your comment, I guess it is still a problem.

For my limited budget, I guess I better go for a sure value with a bottle of Jade VS and maybe stretch it to another bottle of BA2.

Too bad Vert d'Absinthe`s reserve is almost depleted, I`ll have to get a young VS and try to age it myself (an almost impossible task). At least the BA2 already have a decent aging under its cork.
Aggelos
QUOTE(absinthist @ Feb 3 2010, 01:09 PM) *

Moreover, reading the reviews of La D and having tasted L'E and 65, it looks like one takes L'E dilutes it to 65 and gets 65, accelarates its aging and gets La D. The similarities in one and each are too striking.


Not quite… While there is a striking ressemblance between Soixante Cinq, Coquette, Enjoleuse and Desiree, recipes do differ, I think.

For example, at room temperature Soixante Cinq makes me think of bakery while Enjoleuse keeps its fruity and floral aspect.

Desiree, Coquette and Enjoleuse absolutely don't behave the same, but not distillating myself, I can't guess why : Coquette is frank and explosive, Enjoleuse is the opposite, completely elusive, and Desirée is well… Somekind of an elder sister, a controlled strength

But I may be wrong and it may be, like you say, a matter of dilutions and aging…
Aggelos
QUOTE(Wolfgang @ Feb 3 2010, 03:02 PM) *

For my limited budget, I guess I better go for a sure value with a bottle of Jade VS and maybe stretch it to another bottle of BA2.


Hum… While I dearly love the VS, I'd do the opposite :) VS is not what it used to be, even if it's still in the top.

My opinion entirely though
Wolfgang
QUOTE(Aggelos @ Feb 3 2010, 09:08 AM) *


Hum… While I dearly love the VS, I'd do the opposite :) VS is not what it used to be, even if it's still in the top.

My opinion entirely though


What do you mean about the VS ?

My last bottle was from 2007. Did he change de recipe ? I tought it was only a change of label and name.
Aggelos
Well, 2007 is "post-2006", so you shouldn't see much difference. On the Jade 2009 series, still, the debate is quite raging, and not that much in favor of the latest…

But having compared 2006 and post 2006, VS is definitely not what it used to be.
Wolfgang
That's very unfortunate.

Not sure anymore of the dating of my last bottle, I managed to find the empty bottle I kept (far away in a box I had to dig up from a hard to reach location)… It was from June 2006.

I got it a while ago but it was already extra aged by Vert d'Absinthe in Paris…

Ok, we`re now out of topic…I`ll try to dig up the related threads as I`m sure there must be some around here.

Thanks again.
Absomphe
I found the VS to have the most distracting and pronounced funk of all the Jades, post or pre-2006.
Wolfgang
Ho well, I just did a little side by side tasting of Jade Edouard (sept 2007) and BA2.

I`m not so sure anymore if I`ll order another bottle of BA2 ;-).

The BA2 would be a collector`s item, mainly interesting for its rarity, even if quite tasty in its own peculiar way. Something I can`t afford right now…

I did my best to dig out informations about the newest Jade release compared to 2006 bottlings but I could not find any useful information. People mainly wrote about shipping and US availlability but I couldn`t find much info about comparative tasting of the Jade range of absinthes.

I`ll have to rely on faith in the producer`s talent.


+ I still have to taste the PF 1901.
Patlow
offtopic2.gif


I was watching a show on Scotch on TV last weekend, and they were talking about how once a bottle of Scotch is bottled it is done aging. The only aging that occurs that affects taste is done IN the barrel.

The point being: if you have a Scotch aged 12 years in a barrel, and then bottled, and you keep it in a cabinet for 13 years, you do not have a 25 year old bottle of Scotch, but still only a 12 year old bottle, "aging-wise." Is this accurate?

There is lots of talk about aging absinthe here in the bottle (and not just opened and letting breathe, but actually cellaring). Does Scotch age differently? And aside from the Chlorophyll breaking down, scientifically how else does absinthe age in a bottle (that affects taste)?
Wolfgang
All alcools keeps aging in the bottle, some much more slowly than others.

It is true that a 12 years old Bowmore aged 18 years in a bottle will never taste as magnificiant as a 30 years old Bowmore (truely a divine experience by the way). Still, it will certainly mellow out a bit.

I have found that absinthe ages a lot at the beginning and less and less as it goes. The first year is critical and very easy to notice. After that it gets harder and harder to notice.

Of course in my Bowmore exemple, even the "young" 12 years old already have all these years of aging under its cork so it is no surprise we won't find much difference by aging it more in the bottle.

I've recently tasted a Remy Martin VSOP cognac that's been aged an extra 20 years or so by someone who received the bottle and couldn't care less about it. Compared to recent botteling of the same brand, it did get better and mellower and gained some of the aged cognac characteristics but it will never beat a properly barrel aged one.

Now could you immagine an absinthe maker aging his products for 12 years before selling any of it ? From a business point of view, this is just incredible.
Shabba53
QUOTE(Patlow @ Feb 3 2010, 01:12 PM) *
Is this accurate?
And aside from the Chlorophyll breaking down, scientifically how else does absinthe age in a bottle (that affects taste)?

It's pretty accurate, yes. While it's true that it will age somewhat, the flavors aren't affected in the same way they are in absinthe, nor will colors change. Regarding Bowmore, their site discusses aging.

Scotch doesn't have the organics in it that absinthe does.
Provenance
Nor does absinthe rely on wood.
Wolfgang
QUOTE(Provenance @ Feb 3 2010, 03:03 PM) *
Nor does absinthe rely on wood.


Except for Segarra ;-).
G&C
QUOTE(Provenance @ Feb 3 2010, 12:03 PM) *
Nor does absinthe rely on wood.

Like he said.
Patlow
Thanks Wolf & Co. Makes sense.
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