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The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > Absinthe & Absinthiana > Dr Magnan's Lab
Provenance
"Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium L.)—A curious plant with both neurotoxic and neuroprotective properties?" is now available as a Journal of Ethnopharmacology pre-print. Lachenmeier states that the "declining fears of absinthism may have led to a revival of the medical uses of wormwood, evidenced by several experimental reports, e.g. on the treatment of Crohn’s disease."

Nothing new in the article but it does provide a nice summary of wormwood-related research. He concludes by suggesting that, "the risk associated with the occasional medicinal use of wormwood appears to be rather low, however, due to its colourful history, the application in humans should be preceded by a careful risk-benefit analysis, especially considering the toxic properties of chop.gif.

Also now available in Ethnopharmacology online is an uncorrected proof of an article that may explain why some of us here are still alive, "In vivo hepatoprotective activity of the aqueous extract of Artemisia absinthium L. against chemically and immunologically induced liver injuries in mice."

The study concluded "the present in vivo study demonstrated that aqueous extract of Artemisia absinthium exhibit protective activity against chemically as well as immunologically induced acute liver injuries in mice. … The possible mechanisms could be suggested based on our findings that AEAA [aqueous extract of Artemisia absinthium] was able to protect the liver against cellular oxidative damage and maintenance of intracellular level of antioxidantenzymes as well as to act immunoregulatory. However, further studies on the active principles and their biochemical mechanisms responsible for the hepatoprotective effect of Artemisia absinthium will be necessary."
Steve
Here's the link to the abstract. The full article is not available free.
R3al Caravano
Mice always get all the breaks.
mgs
QUOTE(Steve @ Jul 29 2010, 10:51 AM) *

Here's the link to the abstract. The full article is not available free.


Thanks ! I was able to download the file through my university network, since we have a subscription for this publisher. I will be reading, it seems really interesting !

- Marcelo
Shabba53
Both of the articles mentioned above were very good reads. There is another on the same network that discusses AA and its neuroprotective effects that was quite interesting as well:

"Neuroprotective effect of Artemisia absinthium L. on focal ischemia and reperfusion-induced cerebral injury"
Kundan Singh Boraa, Anupam Sharmab
Provenance
Great journal, isn't it?
Shabba53
Great stuff, no doubt.
mgs
so :

absinthe protects the brain,
wine controls cholesterol,
beer is good for the urinary system…

what else do we need ?

- Marcelo
Tibro
Flavor Aid?
Marc
Something for headaches that is 68% too.
Donnie Darko
QUOTE(Shabba53 @ Jul 30 2010, 02:16 PM) *

Both of the articles mentioned above were very good reads. There is another on the same network that discusses AA and its neuroprotective effects that was quite interesting as well:

"Neuroprotective effect of Artemisia absinthium L. on focal ischemia and reperfusion-induced cerebral injury"
Kundan Singh Boraa, Anupam Sharmab


I think there was a typo in the abstract:
"were significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with the methanol extract of Artemisia absinthium".

In any case, it's definitely worth investigating in some sort of clinical trial.

I think the one involving Crohn's disease is the most promising, as that was a small scale placebo controlled study on humans that showed a clear difference between the AA group and the placebo group. It's on the scale of what you might see in a phase II clinical trial.

I must inject some skepticism, however. Of concern is that the study is 3 years old now, and there isn't anything I can find that indicates they are attempting to scale it up. Perhaps they are still trying to get research funding, but usually when one gets results like they got, a larger study is undertaken within about 18 months at most. If it disappears after that it usually means that later something was discovered that contraindicated their results or caused them to think it wasn't worth pursuing further. Crohn's is a very active area of research, so I'm surprised the last thing we've heard about it is from 2007. It is however harder to get funding using natural compounds as natural compounds cannot be licensed by the pharmaceutical industry, so there are not many pharma dollars to go around for researching plant extracts. Meanwhile, the nutritional supplement industry only on very rare occasions will fund a double-blind placebo controlled study involving something the FDA would call a "nutritional supplement", because their bread and butter is usually just getting people to buy their often utterly ineffectual products based on hearsay and speculation. As a result, the only meaningful studies that can be conducted on nutritional supplements then fall to underfunded university research programs, and that particular research often gets abandoned as soon as the primary researcher or post-doctoral student gets offered a better job.
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