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The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > The Monkey Hole > Cake Hole
G&C
Happy Birthday!
Beer.gif
Semper Fi!

G&C
Lots of lookers but no posters to wish the USMC a Happy 235th Birthday.
No problem.

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Kirk
To all those who gave, thank you, from the bottom of my heart. To those who are thinking of joining, please don't do it because of money or lack of opportunity. All the recruiting ads I've seen show a poor family, with a child making a decision that hurts, but offers the promise of help. Forget about that, make a product, grow weed, sell cars, do anything but give in to this advertising campaign.
G&C
That man speaks true.
Donnie Darko
I agree 110% with Kirk's post. Those who join and believe in it are doing a great thing. Those who are doing it to get out of a desperate situation or find some purpose in their life are jeopardizing those who are doing it because they believe in it.
Provenance
I was at Arlington for a funeral earlier this week. The man didn't join for money or opportunity or because he didn't know what else to do with his life. He joined because he did know what to do with his life.
Donnie Darko
I'm sorry to hear he died, but I also respect and greatly admire his sacrifice. I hope that as few people as possible have to lose their lives in a similar fashion.

Incidentally I was one of those kids who refused to stand for the pledge, and it got me in a lot of trouble, but my refusal was for reasons that I feel are more patriotic than the reasons many people have for brainlessly saying the pledge every day. My loyalty is to ideas that promote freedom and mutual benefit, not to maps that define the border of a nation, or a flag or pledge which is transient and isn't even the original pledge of allegiance. I'm quite loyal to very many of the ideas that are in the constitution and the declaration of independence, and I respect anybody that puts their life on the line in order to defend those ideas.
Artemis
QUOTE
reasons many people have for brainlessly saying the pledge


If they have reasons, can you call it brainless?
Donnie Darko
The "reason" to say the pledge, as I understood it in my schools, was because it was supposed patriotic, and because you'd get in trouble if you didn't. So everybody recited the pledge because they were expected to recite the pledge. No one in my schools ever discussed the meaning of the pledge or a reason to do so, beyond the obvious compulsory nationalism. I learned on my own, as opposed to from any history teacher there, that "under god" wasn't even in the original pledge, and that the phrase ironically divides the phrase "one nation indivisible". Besides, why is it necessary to pledge allegiance every day? Isn't my word good enough to pledge allegiance only one time?

Maybe everybody else had well-informed reasons for saying the pledge. Maybe the coach who screamed in my face and suspended my friend and me who did not stand during the pledge at a pep rally had great reasons for saying the pledge and for punishing anyone who did not. If so, nobody ever told me what those reasons were.

People confuse ritual with patriotism. For Veterans day today I took my friend, who spent 4 years in Iraq and Afghanistan as a Navy Pilot, out to lunch. I think buying that guy lunch means more than a lifetime of saluting a flag every morning… for me. But of course a veteran saying the pledge of allegiance may mean a great deal to him, and I would never deny him his wish to say the pledge. I only request that I be shown the same respect.

I apologize for making this thread about me, though. G&C's cartoon just reminded me of high school.

My hat is off to you also, Artemis.
Patlow
Word.
G&C
Happy Armistice Day.
The first day of WWII.
eric
In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

John McCrae
Ron
If you've not had a chance to see it, the Clan MacRae Roll of Honour at Eilean Donan lists all the MacRae dead from the Great War and includes a quote from John McCrae's poem.

As to the Marine Corps birthday, cheers to them. But they don't share their beers, so phooey.

Veteran's Day gets under my skin a little bit, in that the inclusion of all veterans after WWII has caused people to forget about the Great War and its lessons. At least those countries which still celebrate Armistice Day haven't forgotten. Or maybe they have.

Pledge of allegiance? I say it because it's the pledge of allegiance. I swore an oath at one point as well. But I don't judge. Publicly.

IPB Image

G&C
Just a little respect for those that did…


Thank you, Ron.




BTW
I share my beers.
absinthist
enough has been seen.
Provenance
Don't pollute a tribute to the Marines with your posts.

I love the U.S. Marine Corps, they kill fascists dead.
absinthist
enough as well, Mr Red Scum Lover.
Tibro
QUOTE(absinthist @ Nov 16 2010, 11:31 PM) *

enough as well, Mr Red Scum Lover.

No need to be insulting. Minimizing your posts was a good start. But then changing it to be insulting was uncalled for.

My brother was a jarhead. I hardly knew him. And it still hurts. Sometimes I misplace my anger.

But I'm always faithful. And salute those that are.
absinthist
you have expressed your feelings enough for the times of 1890 and beyond, you have no idea of. Concerning your very land, traitor of tradition. Yes, I did call you a traitor. My grandfather was a great soldier that fought in that stupid "great war" of 1914-1918 and I can assure he would NOT rise a glass with such people as you, and he has drunk with many of them: Russians, Yugoslavians, Austrians, Italians, whoever. There was a big party in the Balkans. It was all they cared for.

I salute those that wanted the Europe being great.

I piss on all your (I mean your) insults. What does it make?<-rethorical question. I am getting married, I carry on with distilling, brewing and more and I am still alive-the alcoholism, you dare to accuse me of, has not killed me yet. It is nothing personal, coz maybe it is that fucking internet, we: stupid Poles cannot get the idea of, but it makes you be so small and pathetic kids in kindergarten.

Ain't it*, boy?

*that post has been edited without my consent, btw.
Artemis
QUOTE
My brother was a jarhead. I hardly knew him. And it still hurts.


Ditto. He died a few years ago of cancer. I spoke to him on the telephone (first time we had spoken in years) after I found out (not from him) that he was going to die. He laughed at me. I traveled from Michigan to Louisiana to be at his side, but it was too late when I got there - he was incoherent and on morphine. I went outside for a smoke and he died as I walked back into the room. He had been awarded the Bronze Star in Vietnam. He never said a word about that incident to anybody as far as I know. I found the citation and read it at his funeral.
Oxygenee
QUOTE(absinthist @ Nov 17 2010, 02:17 AM) *


*that post has been edited without my consent, btw.


Your post was edited to remove the real name of a forum member, which you used in defiance of forum policy.

If you use a forum member's real first name, last name or private address information ever again, you will be banned permanently from Fee Verte, without any further warning or notification.
absinthist
His ass is saved, then. And, as a matter of fact, it touches the essence more without resorting to diminutives.

Obviously, I would not consider you acting like someone who has been known for acting that way, hence the subtle reaction.
Tibro
Condolences, Artemis. My brother didn't make it back from Viet Nam. I have a little round pin with a gold star and some indefinite US inscription on the back that was among my mother's jewelry after she passed away. After some research I think it must have been presented to her to commemorate the loss of her son. That and some pictures. A few vague memories. Mostly anecdotes about him from my Mom. It was the first funeral I ever attended. The military salute graveside was startling to a young boy.
Artemis
Condolence back at you.

After the doctor told my brother he was finished, he cried for about a day, then sold his pearl white Harley, took the money to the undertaker and made his arrangements. He didn't want a military funeral, but then changed his mind because he thought the spectacle might inspire his stepson. Nowadays they make do with VFW members to fire the salute - that's what he had. It's okay - once were soldiers. Around 1965, the first local boy was shipped home in a box from Vietnam. He was of African descent. The burial was behind the little white church on the plantation where we all grew up - "Morning Glory" was the name on the church. Active duty soldiers were sent from the nearest military installation to fire the salute back then. When those rifles went off, the startled howling from the women was something to hear. To this day I am ashamed I went to that ceremony for the spectacle - at least I and my unwashed childish friends had the sense to hang back from the mourners and watch from a distance. When I left the plantation for the last time some years back, I made it a point to go to that graveyard first, visit his grave, and say I was sorry for my ignorance.
Donnie Darko
That's a moving story. I've done and said stupid things in my youth regarding the military. I used to get beat up by ROTC guys when I was a skater in high school, and I ended up assuming that all things military were in the same bucket of brutish gung-ho meathead mentality. But I've met many many military people since then that have shattered that stereotype and thankfully proved me very very wrong.

A poignant example of what a real soldier is, is the fellow who was awarded the Medal of Honor today, the first living person to have received it since Vietnam. His name is Staff Sgt. Salvatore A. Giunta, and the story of what he did is remarkable, but what he said about receiving the medal was even more so: “I lost two dear friends of mine,” he said. “I would give this back in a second to have my friends with me right now.”
Artemis
Gung Ho is derived from Mandarin Chinese "gong he".

It simply means "working together". I learned this in language school when I was in the military; also that Gong Fu (Kung Fu) is not a martial art per se, but physical exercise.

Remember Gong He the next time you hear the pledge of allegiance! abs-cheers.gif

Also, "hubbub" comes from Mandarin "hao bu hao" (good / not good), Chinese greeting equivalent to "how are you", heard so many times in a Chinese marketplace at the same time that it results in ..... hubbub.

Never mind about the Chinese fire drill.
Donnie Darko
Yeah, no kidding. I didn't know that was the meaning, which turns my assumption of what it meant on its head.

Artemis
QUOTE
His name is Staff Sgt. Salvatore A. Giunta, and the story of what he did is remarkable


Thanks for that. Ever heard of Rick Rescorla? Everybody needs to hear about him. Last year some time I was watching "Gladiator" again, and in the scene where the Germans are about to square off against the Romans, and the Germans are singing, I thought, WTF? - that's an AFRICAN language - where have I heard that before? Well, it was in the film "Zulu" - the Zulus were singing it before they attacked the British. The Brits responded by singing "Men of Harlech". So, looking for information about THAT song, I found this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rick_Rescorla

http://www.rickrescorla.com/Cornwall.htm
Donnie Darko
I saw a re-enactment of his actions in a documentary, I forget which one it was, but surprisingly they didn't sensationalize any of it. What he did is about as heroic as it gets.
Ron
QUOTE(G&C @ Nov 16 2010, 12:14 PM) *

Just a little respect for those that did…


Thank you, Ron.


BTW
I share my beers.


Cheers, brother.
bobt
I want to thank all of you for the heartfelt sentiments expressed here. Artemis and Tibro, please accept my condolences, which I also extend to those of you who have not spoken specifically of your losses. All the best to you.
Provenance
QUOTE(bobt @ Nov 17 2010, 06:03 AM) *
Artemis and Tibro, please accept my condolences, which I also extend to those of you who have not spoken specifically of your losses. All the best to you.

Indeed.
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