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The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > Absinthe & Absinthiana > Absinthe in the News & in the Media
Steve
The 1915 ban on absinthe in France has been officially repealed! Google translate version here.
Aggelos
QUOTE(Steve @ Dec 17 2010, 04:26 PM) *

The 1915 ban on absinthe in France has been officially repealed! Google translate version here.

L'est républicain jumped on the trigger.

Unless I am utterly mistaken, while the law has been approved by both the senate and the assembly, it's only the first reading, by no means the end of the process.
I have been much more careful in my communication, and I'm always watching the evolutions of this law. That it may have moved so quick is just impossible : it has been in the hands of the senate for a whole year already.

Since there have been many amendments, we still need a second reading, and maybe even a last vote. When l'est republicain says that "la navette" which is the name of the process, has been achieved, I call bullshit
Steve
The French legislative process remains a complete mystery to me. @vertdabsinthe posted this on twitter this morning, and I figured he must know.
Aggelos
QUOTE(Steve @ Dec 17 2010, 09:04 PM) *

The French legislative process remains a complete mystery to me. @vertdabsinthe posted this on twitter this morning, and I figured he must know.


Yeah, they've read it in the news. But I have this law proposal under close scrutiny, and I am following the official minutes of the various discussions and votes : it's only the first reading
Provenance
There's no cause to repeal the ban. If the French was to drink real absinthe, they can buy American.
Steve
As far as I know, "absinthe" remains illegal in the U.S. as well as France.
Provenance
Really?
Ron
Steve, "Absinthe" is allowed on labels in the US, but it's not supposed to be prominent. Having said that, and also noting the picture above, the TTB has allowed a gradual shift in policy. Here are the two Ridge labels:


IPB Image

IPB Image
Steve
Yes, I'm well aware that you can put the word absinthe on the label. However the product is not allowed to be called "absinthe", similar to the situation in France. The product is "grain neutral spirit distilled with herbs" or whatever. In addition you are not allowed to write the word "absinthe" without a modifier on the label. You can say "extrait d'absinthe whatever" just like in France, or "absinthe superieure verte whatever". It's still not "absinthe". Similar to the situation in France.

Ron, how are you saying those labels demonstrate a shift in policy? I don't see it.
Tibro
Does labeling even matter? I understand that there are reputable people that even refer to Hills as "absinthe". With a straight face.
Steve
And there are other people who have an agenda which turns every thread into the same discussion. I think the label does matter, and I think it will be an important step when this legislation finally does become law in France.
Donnie Darko
That was funny though.
Ron
QUOTE(Steve @ Dec 17 2010, 06:27 PM) *

However the product is not allowed to be called "absinthe", similar to the situation in France. The product is "grain neutral spirit distilled with herbs" or whatever. In addition you are not allowed to write the word "absinthe" without a modifier on the label. You can say "extrait d'absinthe whatever" just like in France, or "absinthe superieure verte whatever". It's still not "absinthe". Similar to the situation in France.

Did any absinthe just say "Absinthe" on the label? Butterfly sort of did I guess. But most had modifiers. Pernod Fils and Berger had "extrait d'absinthe" and Oxygenee had "absinthe hygenique." And you know that many others just used superieure, ordinaire, or what have you. All of those are fine on labels in the US, but not in France, as I understand it. "Spirit of the extract of absinthe plants" isn't the same thing.

QUOTE(Steve @ Dec 17 2010, 06:27 PM) *

Ron, how are you saying those labels demonstrate a shift in policy? I don't see it.

I should say the appearance of a policy shift. The policy remains that "absinthe" shouldn't be prominent on the label. I would say that on the example Prov put and the Ridge labels both show a fairly prominent use of the word. But that's subjective and in the realm of TTB I suppose.

The "grain neutral spirit distilled with herbs" isn't because absinthe is illegal in the US, or there is a rule against it. It has to do with the fact that there is currently no classification for absinthe. If absinthe were its own class of spirit, it wouldn't need "neutral spirit distilled with herbs," however most labels would still likely say "absinthe superieure" or something similar. I recall Zman specifically saying that the TTB would never allow "extrait d'absinthe" on the label. That may have been the case when he was getting his COLA, but it doesn't appear to be the same now. That's all I was getting at.
Shabba53
From discussion I've had, 'prominent' pretty much just means it can't be the largest print on the label.
Kirk
QUOTE(Tibro @ Dec 17 2010, 06:35 PM) *

Does labeling even matter? I understand that there are reputable people that even refer to Hills as "absinthe". With a straight face.

That was hilarious.
Alan
QUOTE(Steve @ Dec 17 2010, 03:43 PM) *
I think it will be an important step when this legislation finally does become law in France.

Is there also a possibility that this legislation will make it easier for brands like Hills and King of Spirits to get into France? If they don't need to have a different label for France, what's to stop them - and many other Eastern European style products - getting into France?
Aggelos
That's why I heard there is some work being done by the French industry in that respect. But what is being done, I don't quite know.
sixela
QUOTE(Alan @ Dec 18 2010, 04:35 PM) *
what's to stop them - and many other Eastern European style products - getting into France?


Uhm - the fact it tastes like bad cough syrup?
Shabba53
As they say, there's no accounting for taste…
Provenance
It would be interesting to know if RV gets many repeat orders for Hills and other non-ideologically pure absinthe products.
Zman
QUOTE(sixela @ Dec 20 2010, 01:21 PM) *

QUOTE(Alan @ Dec 18 2010, 04:35 PM) *
what's to stop them - and many other Eastern European style products - getting into France?


Uhm - the fact it tastes like bad cough syrup?


That good?
Marc
QUOTE(Provenance @ Dec 21 2010, 01:02 AM) *

It would be interesting to know if RV gets many repeat orders for Hills and other non-ideologically pure absinthe products.

AFAIK, no, they get repeat orders for authentic absinthes.
Jaded Prole
Maybe when someone orders the terrible swill a note encouraging them to try something better with some absinthe information should be enclosed with it so that they do not just write off their foul experience as definitive of absinthe.
Steve
OK, it's really a fait accompli this time. Today, May 18, 2011, 96 years after after the prohibition of absinthe in France on May 16, 1915, the ban is officially and finally repealed. Vive la France, vive l'absinthe!
Provenance
There is no real absinthe in France, unless its imported from Val-de-Travers.
Absinthesizer
You made me spit absinthe through my nose!
Jaded Prole
Something to celebrate!

I don't have anything French at present so I'll make due with something more local.
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