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The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > The Monkey Hole > Arts & Philosphical Sundries
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Marc
Sold by Christie's on May 11th for $ 33,682,500 :

IPB Image


And that one sold for 15 millions dollars :

IPB Image


If you have children, ask them to paint, who knows…
Kirk
I don't get it, maybe it's upside down.
Provenance
What's there to get?
Tibro
Mark Rothko's work is among the most moving I've ever experienced. But I've never seen a reproduction that can reproduce the feeling. They need to be experienced full size at arm's length, about the distance he would have painted them at. Hanging a Rothko too high is a travesty. You need to be able to walk into and be enveloped by the emotionally charged space he creates.
Donnie Darko
Abstract artists have been hearing the "anybody's kid could do that" complaint since the 1950s, as if technical skill were the only thing that mattered in art. The point is that nobody's kid has done that and achieved the same effect/success. Looking at a Pollack online or in a book is a waste of time, you might as well read the phonebook instead. Standing in front of an original in a museum has a unique effect on the viewer, because it engulfs them with chaos. Since we're hard wired to be pattern seeking, we keep following the trails and diffusion of colors looking for some sort of order, but there is no ordered aesthetic, thus making the whole thing appear accidental. But it isn't accidental, it was designed to consume you. If an artist gets me to feel the way they wanted me to feel, then I consider that a success, and I feel consumed by some abstract artists.

Of course there are plenty of abstract artists who make me feel or think nothing at all, so for those guys, yeah, somebody's kid might as well have done it, since the kid would likely have no more intent or skill or vision or anything different from what the artist employed in making the work.
Jaded Prole
I've never had much regard for Pollock but Rothko's work is great.
Artemis
Over 48 million dollars for shit not worth the kerosene to burn it.

Never mind children, apes could do as well.
Artemis
QUOTE
But it isn't accidental, it was designed to consume you


I'm not buying it. It wasn't designed to do anything. The maker was (possibly) following some imperative, possibly schizophrenic, not unlike a psycho killer, driven to do what he did. He only knows what moves HIM. He doesn't know shit about anybody else, and maybe that's a good thing.
Artemis
Black velvet Elvis, now that I understand.
Artemis
And cilantro is the Devil's own weed.
Donnie Darko
QUOTE(Artemis @ Jun 10 2011, 11:07 PM) *

QUOTE
But it isn't accidental, it was designed to consume you


I'm not buying it. It wasn't designed to do anything. The maker was (possibly) following some imperative, possibly schizophrenic, not unlike a psycho killer, driven to do what he did. He only knows what moves HIM. He doesn't know shit about anybody else, and maybe that's a good thing.


Pollack was definitely insane. Not sure about Rothko.
Being insane isn't pleasant, and neither are the paintings. Their paintings either give me an insight into their warped perception, or else they have tricked me into thinking their paintings do. Either way, it's a success.

That being said, I'd love to see a painting made by an ape, as I probably would find that more interesting than many abstract painters.
Donnie Darko
I can only stand that shit for so long though. I like it while I'm standing in front of it at the museum. But then I go home and listen to / watch better art, like this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j1-xRk6llh4
That's far more memorable and likeable than some million dollar ejaculation of paint.
!!!
thegreenimp
QUOTE(Artemis @ Jun 10 2011, 10:09 PM) *

Black velvet Elvis, now that I understand.


I always lean toward the classics, Dogs playing poker.

Click to view attachment
Jaded Prole
A true con-a sewer.
Artemis
How about dogs playing poker with Elvis at the last supper with the Superbowl on the TV?

Click to view attachment


Artemis
QUOTE
listen to / watch better art, like this:


Killer! Thanks for that!

Back at you - good song, amazing movie:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jMruFHTwrY
Jaded Prole
Actually, I've long wanted a version of the Last Supper done in dogs.
Jaded Prole
Thanks!

Though I always pictured Jesus as an Iris Setter or an Afghan Hound.

Thanks!

Though I always pictured Jesus as an Iris Setter or an Afghan Hound.
thegreenimp
QUOTE(Artemis @ Jun 11 2011, 02:19 PM) *

How about dogs playing poker with Elvis at the last supper with the Superbowl on the TV?

Click to view attachment



I never watch,…Football!
Click to view attachment
G&C
Where's the Absinthe?
Absomphe
With those eyes rolling up into his head, my guess is, he drank it all.
G&C
But there are no empties on/around the table!
Not even any glassware.
Artemis
QUOTE
Though I always pictured Jesus as an Iris Setter or an Afghan Hound.


Shroud of Turin.

I've seen reconstructions of what he actually must have looked like, based upon skulls of Jews from the time and what is known about their customs. More like a Pug than an Irish Setter - short, stocky, close-cropped hair.
Absomphe
QUOTE(G&C @ Jun 12 2011, 09:01 AM) *

But there are no empties on/around the table!
Not even any glassware.


Jesus recycles in mysterious ways.
thegreenimp
QUOTE(Artemis @ Jun 12 2011, 11:19 AM) *

QUOTE
Though I always pictured Jesus as an Iris Setter or an Afghan Hound.


Shroud of Turin.

I've seen reconstructions of what he actually must have looked like, based upon skulls of Jews from the time and what is known about their customs. More like a Pug than an Irish Setter - short, stocky, close-cropped hair.


Sounds like a Boxer.
Stroller
QUOTE(Marc @ Jun 10 2011, 10:15 AM) *


If you have children, ask them to paint, who knows…



Amber Von Doom's 12yr old.

IPB Image
Jaded Prole
The kid's got talent!
Absomphe
Indeed!
Patlow
QUOTE(Donnie Darko @ Jun 10 2011, 07:25 PM) *

I can only stand that shit for so long though. I like it while I'm standing in front of it at the museum. But then I go home and listen to / watch better art, like this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j1-xRk6llh4
That's far more memorable and likeable than some million dollar ejaculation of paint.
!!!



I hate that song almost as much as I hate anything in the world. I think it's the first time we have ever disagreed. (Or maybe it's just a bad association for me and it might be a good song, or even excellent, but anyhoo…I like this better: http://vimeo.com/21441071)
R3al Caravano
There are some artists that deny any emotional content, and proclaim that technique is supreme, and their works would not easily confused with something that a child could do, for example Chuck Close http://blogs.princeton.edu/graphicarts/200…chuck_clos.html . I look out the window and cannot predict which leaf on the oak tree will begin shaking in the wind first (and with what rhythm), and I am not going to deny that the action lacks cause and effect, simply, because it is too complex to immediately understand. Can my cat paint cubism, can my cat paint Picasso, depends on whether my cat can paint early Picasso and the many years of transition that developed cubism? Can my cat make a bottle of absinthe, is based on whether you consider LTV absinthe.
Artemis
Wolf Like Me is beyond excellent. I liked it even better after I had seen the lyrics.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-flF4vKsPgM

QUOTE
just a bad association


That can happen, though. I never heard that song before Darko posted it, myself.
Tibro
Well, fuck me, thanks for the link. The first one was forbidden in my region.

Maybe paintings should have regions where they're disallowed. Seems some minds may be set up that way already.

Artemis
Marc made the same post about the paintings at the French forum. The respondents there thought they were shit as well until one guy posted a LONG explanation and/or apology for them. I understood what he was saying, just as I understood what you and Darko said in their defense above. My answer to all that is that they're still shit. It's possible that standing right in front of one, it would induce in me some vertigo, or whatever it's "supposed" to do, but there used to be gadgets in a box of cereal that would do the same.

Art makes me want to live forever and wish I had never been born.
Tibro
That's pretty much what a Rothko does for me.

Some say my quotient of shit is unusually high though.
Habu
QUOTE(Marc @ Jun 10 2011, 07:15 PM) *

If you have children, ask them to paint, who knows…
This girl is (was?) no artist either and I bet her "drawings" would sell too…
IPB Image
Provenance
QUOTE(Tibro @ Jun 10 2011, 10:09 AM) *
Mark Rothko's work is among the most moving I've ever experienced. But I've never seen a reproduction that can reproduce the feeling. They need to be experienced full size at arm's length, about the distance he would have painted them at. Hanging a Rothko too high is a travesty. You need to be able to walk into and be enveloped by the emotionally charged space he creates.


In which case you oughta come to DC.

QUOTE
JUST OPENED


Mark Rothko: Seagram Murals

December 6, 2011–August 15, 2012

East Building, Concourse Gallery 29H

In June 1958, Mark Rothko accepted a commission to decorate a dining room in the Four Seasons restaurant of the Seagram Building on Park Avenue in Manhattan, a new modernist skyscraper by Philip Johnson and Mies van der Rohe. Departing from his wonted format of floating rectangles in glowing colors, Rothko produced wine-dark paintings with ambiguous portal shapes evoking what he called a "closed space." From the fall of 1958 into 1959 he was completely absorbed, making some thirty paintings even though the room only offered places for seven. At the same time, he became increasingly doubtful that a luxury restaurant with its wealthy patrons was the appropriate venue for his art. He withdrew, canceling what would have been his first painted environment—a "place," as he ambitiously said, rather than just a group of paintings. He did, however, complete commissions for a room at Harvard University and a chapel in Houston before his death in 1970.

In 1985 and 1986, the National Gallery of Art received a vast gift of works from the Mark Rothko Foundation, including several paintings deriving from the so-called Seagram Mural project. The installation of three of these in the Concourse galleries of the East Building is timed to coincide with the presentation of John Logan's play Red at Arena Stage (January 20 to March 4), which dramatizes Rothko's struggle with the commission.

www.nga.gov/collection/rothko.htm
Tibro
The key words here may be "deriving from". It's my understanding that the actual paintings, or murals, intended for The Four Seasons are hanging in The Tate Modern in London. They were brilliantly hung in the old Tate building and then I saw them again as part of a large Rothko retrospective in the new Tate building. I'm sure they would have ruined many a diner's experience had they fulfilled their original intent. They're big and brooding in a way that's much different from most of his work. Not my favorites, to be honest, but a key piece in the overall work to be sure.

At some point I need to get myself to the Rothko chapel in Houston though.
sixela
QUOTE(Artemis @ Jun 14 2011, 09:00 PM) *

Art makes me want to live forever and wish I had never been born.

Standing before a Rothko makes you doubt you exist, doubt anything exists and makes you sure more than everything you can imagine exists and is eternal at the same time. It's an indescribable feeling.

But I agree with the others: you have to be in front of the full-sized genuine article. Some of the most puzzling things are the rich colours, the subtle variations and the weird transitions between them. That's all palpable, but not scaled down and represented in NTSC/PAL or RGB colour space (which are unable to represent all colours).
Tibro
Damn. I may have to reassess. I kind of had you pegged as someone whose aesthetic experiences were tied to David's hard marble cock.
Jaded Prole
True. A good reason for a D.C trip.
Provenance
An exhibit that can only be appreciated in person: Pastrana Tapestries
Tibro
Couldn't you have mentioned it earlier?
Provenance
I probably should have. They are absolutely just spectacular.

There's still a few weeks left, c'mon.
Tibro
QUOTE
The oil-on-canvas abstract expressionist painting was spared additional damage when the woman tried to urinate on it but apparently missed.

"It doesn't appear she urinated on the painting or that the urine damaged it, so she's not being charged with that," Kimbrough said according to the Denver Post.


She did manage to rub her ass on it. "It" being a painting by Clyfford Still in the newly opened Clyfford Still Museum in Denver.

Piss on it. Now I need an excuse to visit Denver.
Provenance
Three questions:

1. If the artist had paid the woman to urinate on the painting, would it have increased its value?

2. Could the museum have sold tickets to the urination?

3. If the woman had urinated on the painting and it wasn't mentioned in the press/internet, would anyone know?
Artemis
Nearsighted people would know. After it got ripe, even the janitor would know and he probably doesn't give the paintings a glance.
Kirk
That painting got more than it deserved.
Kirk
If she pissed on my artwork it wouldn't hurt a bit, I pound the xit all the time with no ill effect.
Kirk
I would've payed to see her do it, I wouldn't pay to see what the artist did.
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