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The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > Absinthe & Absinthiana > General Absinthe Discussion
ellen
I would like to hear people's favorite uses of Absinthe in cooking.

Here is my (current) fav:


Red Clam Sauce La Fee Verte

Few tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup chopped onion
few garlic cloves, minced
few anchovies
few tablespoons chopped fresh basil
pinch flaked red pepper
pinch black pepper
1/2-1 cup chopped Italian tomatoes (depending on how much sauce you want to make)
1 tablespoon tomato paste
clam juice
clams (can use canned, or in the shell, or both)
1/2 cup fish stock or a dab of fish glace
splash red wine (Tuscan or Beaujolais)
dash balsamic vinegar
pinch salt
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon of your favorite Absinthe (or to taste)

Brown onion in the oil, then add garlic, basil, anchovies, red pepper and black pepper. Saute for a minute, then add tomatos, clam broth, fish broth or glace, red wine, tomato paste and a dash of balsamic vinegar. Cook slowly until sauce begins to thicken. Add salt to taste.

Shortly before serving, add clams. If fresh clams are used, cover the pan and steam them open.

Before serving, stir in 1 tablespoon butter and the Absinthe.

If the sauce gets too thick while you are making the pasta, add a little of the pasta cooking water.

Serve with pasta of your choice. Grate cheese on top if you like.


Kirk
This is my recipe for what I call cymbala, it's basically a biscoti:
5 eggs
6 cups flour, more or less, usually more
2 cups sugar
1 cup nuts
1.5 sticks melted butter
6 tsp baking powder, or less, usually less
.5 cup absinthe
ground anise
mix all ingredients together and roll into a snake, form that into 4 rings or wreaths and bake on greased sheet til golden brown, (45 min) slice with a sharp serrated knife or saw after cool, I usually freeze a few whole and slice later. Sometimes I toast the slices, then it's biscotti and it keeps forever.

pierreverte
Steak or shrimp.
Simple pan fry with ground pepper, then flambée with a shot of absinthe.
(You need to heat the absinthe in a small metal pot, until it starts to vapor, then light it).
After trying several, the herb-bill of the Duplais Verte works best for me.
A solid base open to much personal variation.
Jaded Prole
Brussels Sprouts

1 third stick of butter
generous pinch (maybe half tbsp) tarragon
Granulated garlic or 1 large minced garlic clove.
Third of a cup absinthe
salt to taste.

Cook Brussels sprouts until mostly done in salted water. Drain most but not all of the water. Cut in the butter, add tarragon, garlic and absinthe. Cook until the absinthe is reduced and toss the sprouts around in the remaining sauce.
sbmac
All the crappy absinthe like Grande Absente, Pernod, etc… that friends bring to my house, is fine in vanilla milkshakes and cupcakes.
Steve
I have made Kirk's cymbala a couple of times, and it was excellent.
Donnie Darko
QUOTE(pierreverte @ Nov 2 2011, 10:54 PM) *

Steak or shrimp.
Simple pan fry with ground pepper, then flambée with a shot of absinthe.
(You need to heat the absinthe in a small metal pot, until it starts to vapor, then light it).
After trying several, the herb-bill of the Duplais Verte works best for me.
A solid base open to much personal variation.


The first legitimate lighting of absinthe on fire!
pierreverte
agreed…
Artemis
I drink it while heating a TV dinner in the microwave oven, or boiling a hot dog.
Green Baron
An excellent recipe Artemis. Since I have a mild culinary disability when it comes to any kind of serious cooking with heat, I've resorted to slowly adding ice water to my absinthe. Though Jarry would've taken a dim view of this approach, it works for me rather well.
Artemis
Click to view attachment
When it comes to clams, it's probably better to skip all those ingredients and just drink this instead.

Seriously, if I'm going to cook something that involves a bit of preparation, such as chopping ingredients, I do like to drink an absinthe while doing it. I never put it into anything I cook. I'm not fond of the flavor of anise, not even in absinthe - if there were no buzz, I wouldn't even drink that stuff (I can't say the same for nice malty beer).

I have to agree that those cookies Kirk makes are good, but they would be good without the anise.

Provenance
Clamsinthe. Made with rare aquatic AA strain, Clamsinthium Absinthium. None finer.
thegreenimp
QUOTE(Artemis @ Nov 4 2011, 01:34 PM) *

I drink it while heating a TV dinner in the microwave oven, or boiling a hot dog.


I just bring home a pizza.

I'll spend more time fixing the Imp's food than I do for myself.
Jaded Prole
I usually drink Absinthe while preparing and cooking meals as well.
Patlow
That sounds smart and fun.
ellen
QUOTE(Artemis @ Nov 4 2011, 08:06 PM) *

Click to view attachment
When it comes to clams, it's probably better to skip all those ingredients and just drink this instead.

Seriously, if I'm going to cook something that involves a bit of preparation, such as chopping ingredients, I do like to drink an absinthe while doing it. I never put it into anything I cook. I'm not fond of the flavor of anise, not even in absinthe - if there were no buzz, I wouldn't even drink that stuff (I can't say the same for nice malty beer).

I have to agree that those cookies Kirk makes are good, but they would be good without the anise.


Ha Ha!

Red clam sauce tastes best with fresh fennel in it. I discovered the absinthe version when I was out of fresh fennel and drinking absinthe while making red clam sauce. The green fairy whispered in my ear: "you have something better than fresh fennel in your hand". I was drinking Sauvage, prickly with wormwood. Into the sauce went a couple of tablespoons… and I never looked back :-)

Ellen
ellen
QUOTE(Kirk @ Nov 3 2011, 02:01 AM) *

This is my recipe for what I call cymbala, it's basically a biscoti:
5 eggs
6 cups flour, more or less, usually more
2 cups sugar
1 cup nuts
1.5 sticks melted butter
6 tsp baking powder, or less, usually less
.5 cup absinthe
ground anise
mix all ingredients together and roll into a snake, form that into 4 rings or wreaths and bake on greased sheet til golden brown, (45 min) slice with a sharp serrated knife or saw after cool, I usually freeze a few whole and slice later. Sometimes I toast the slices, then it's biscotti and it keeps forever.



I will try this, thanks!

Ellen
ellen
QUOTE(pierreverte @ Nov 3 2011, 02:54 AM) *

Steak or shrimp.
Simple pan fry with ground pepper, then flambée with a shot of absinthe.
(You need to heat the absinthe in a small metal pot, until it starts to vapor, then light it).
After trying several, the herb-bill of the Duplais Verte works best for me.
A solid base open to much personal variation.


Why not? Flaming with cognac is so last century…

Thanks,
Ellen
ellen
QUOTE(Jaded Prole @ Nov 3 2011, 12:40 PM) *

Brussels Sprouts

1 third stick of butter
generous pinch (maybe half tbsp) tarragon
Granulated garlic or 1 large minced garlic clove.
Third of a cup absinthe
salt to taste.

Cook Brussels sprouts until mostly done in salted water. Drain most but not all of the water. Cut in the butter, add tarragon, garlic and absinthe. Cook until the absinthe is reduced and toss the sprouts around in the remaining sauce.



Yum! I love brussels sprouts… this sounds like brussels sprouts in herb garden heaven sauce!

Thanks,
Ellen
ellen
Just googling "butter Pernod" turns up dozens of recipes (mostly for seafood) which were once, presumably, in some earlier version, made with Pernod absinthe: garlic Pernod butter, steamed mussels with Pernod, lobster with Pernod butter, escargot with Pernod butter, salmon with fennel and Pernod, clams and linguini with Pernod, etc. "Pernod butter" is an herb butter made with anisey herbs such as tarragon or chervil, shallots and garlic, lemon, salt, pepper and Pernod (or absinthe).

I have vague memories of these recipes left over from my terrine and quiche days in the '70s, when everyone was cooking French. I didn't especially love Pernod, so I usually replaced it with cognac.

Pretty much any butter sauce made with garden herbs including tarragon, chervil, fennel or anise is probably fair game for a splash of absinthe.
ellen
Tweaks & hints for the Red Clam Sauce recipe:

Use fresh fennel too, even if you plan to add absinthe.

Put at least 2 T of absinthe into the sauce when you add the clam juice. Unless you have homemade fish stock or seafood stock, try the More Than Gourmet glaces. Add a T or so of either/both the Poisson or Fruits de Mer when you add the clam juice.

Regardless of whether the clams are canned or fresh, don't cook them -- just heat them through. Add them with the butter at the end.

Add a "few drops" of absinthe when you swirl in the butter.

Don't listen to the naysayers -- this recipe is killer.

Feel free to replace the clams with any mix of seafood you like. You may have to add other types of seafood earlier to cook them.

Cheese is optional and grate it on to taste, but as a general rule, don't drown seafood pastas in cheese.

Fresh herbs and a squeeze of lemon are nice. But remember: absinthe is bitters par excellence -- herbs in a bottle.

Final Rule: Absinthe and butter cover many sins. Like a drizzle of white truffle oil, this combination seems to be a way to "kick up" all sorts of food. No wonder there are so many Belle Epoch recipes that call for "Pernod". Absinthe is an herb garden in a bottle.




QUOTE(ellen @ Nov 3 2011, 01:00 AM) *

I would like to hear people's favorite uses of Absinthe in cooking.

Here is my (current) fav:


Red Clam Sauce La Fee Verte

Few tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup chopped onion
few garlic cloves, minced
few anchovies
few tablespoons chopped fresh basil
pinch flaked red pepper
pinch black pepper
1/2-1 cup chopped Italian tomatoes (depending on how much sauce you want to make)
1 tablespoon tomato paste
clam juice
clams (can use canned, or in the shell, or both)
1/2 cup fish stock or a dab of fish glace
splash red wine (Tuscan or Beaujolais)
dash balsamic vinegar
pinch salt
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon of your favorite Absinthe (or to taste)

Brown onion in the oil, then add garlic, basil, anchovies, red pepper and black pepper. Saute for a minute, then add tomatos, clam broth, fish broth or glace, red wine, tomato paste and a dash of balsamic vinegar. Cook slowly until sauce begins to thicken. Add salt to taste.

Shortly before serving, add clams. If fresh clams are used, cover the pan and steam them open.

Before serving, stir in 1 tablespoon butter and the Absinthe.

If the sauce gets too thick while you are making the pasta, add a little of the pasta cooking water.

Serve with pasta of your choice. Grate cheese on top if you like.
Bruno Rygseck
Time for a snack. I'll have a savoury invented by myself: a piece of toast spread with cottage cheese, olive rings and lettuce, sprinkled lightly with louched absinthe.
Tibro
Cottage cheese? Or quark?
Bruno Rygseck
Cottage cheese. Quark I'd use for milkshakes (quarkshakes?), with blueberries and maybe add a dash of some liqueur.
Provenance
I've heard of people who live, breathe and eat quantum mechanics but this is just ridiculous.
Bruno Rygseck
Didn't Albert Einstein experiment with sugar solutions using his bathtub? Did he ever try to add a bottle of Berger for instance?
Absomphe
QUOTE(Tibro @ Jan 20 2012, 03:43 PM) *

Or Quark?


Ferengi and absinthe.

Two grate tastes that taste grate together.
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