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The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > Absinthe & Absinthiana > General Absinthe Discussion
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delirium
Can you tell me what that means?
The Standard Deviant
The name of an album of ambient music recorded in 2001.

In any case, it seems taetra is Latin for "offensive" so I would guess they have tried to translate 'Hideous Absinthe' into Latin!
Artemis
It's the title of a poem by Ernest Dowson who no doubt borrowed the words from Lucretius, who wrote in De Rerum Natura that doctors would beguile children into drinking a medicine of foul-tasting wormwood (absinthia taetra) by coating the glass with honey.
delirium
Thank you very much. I was considering translating some of these poems into Finnish and reading them in certain occasion.
Artemis
In that case, whatever Finnish words capture the intent of "foul wormwood" or "disgusting wormwood" would probably be appropriate.
Provenance
It's nice that they warn people not to drink it.

Or a I missing a goth subtext?
Artemis
You're missing an "m".

But to translate the poem, the title should probably be left in Latin, and if necessary at the reading, explained in Finnish.

It's no secret that wormwood is nasty. If absinthe were to be made the way that old medicine was, nobody would want to drink it. I believe the poem deals in what is commonly called irony. Maybe it's ironic that Lucretius mentioned tricking children into drinking it, and Dowson supposedly was in love with an 11-year-old girl, who spurned him, causing him to drink more, not less.
Donnie Darko
I was in love with an 11 year old once, but I was 8. No poetry or absinthe involved, just innocence and stupidity. Sometimes I wonder about pederasts. Obviously it's horrible and can seriously traumatize the child, but I wonder if pedophiles have some brain mis-wiring that made them fail to outgrow their childish attractions, like Michael Jackson. Not to mention the fact that pedophilia is enshrined in some religions (read Mohammed's musings about his 9 year old crush). It's a peculiar phenomenon I don't comprehend, and I think it's equally sad for both the molester and the molestee.
G&C
The only sad thing about the molester is they rarely get what they deserve.

Their balls smashed with the claw end of a hammer…
hartsmar
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1C1N8KYhtY
The Standard Deviant
Artemis beats Google any day!
delirium
I spoke about this to my friend who has a small book business. He got interested and we thought we could collaborate to make a small booklet with absinthe poems translated to Finnish, and even make some prints for sale. I know someone who practises photograhy so we could produce the images ourselves. Maybe include a introduction about the history of absinthe. Exciting!
delirium
Ok, I'm seriously planning this project. If you have any ideas, suggestions etc, bring it up.
Provenance
Check out an example of the best modern printing of an absinthe poetry book I know of, http://www.oxygenee.com/absinthe-buy/books1.html
delirium
Thanks, that looks excellent.

Btw. I found this Charles Cross' poem with two different headlines. Is the other one accurate?

http://www.absinthe.se/absinthe-poetry#charles_cros

http://absinthehour.com/2009/01/absinthe-p…y-charles-cros/

Kirk
I have both copies and I can tell you they are beautifully printed, you can feel the letters on the page where the original plates embossed the high quality hand cut paper, more of a piece of art than book, although I have read them over and over.
Artemis
The title of that poem as Cros apparently intended it to be was "Lendemain", which is "the day after", but possibly Cros did not mean that literally - it could mean the future, or the consequences (of some action). In French, the poem rhymes, a b b a.

http://people.zeelandnet.nl/henklensen/cros.htm

http://french.about.com/cs/vocabulary/g/lendemain.htm
Artemis
Nepenthes kindly gifted me with a copy of the Tisserand booklet, and Kirk is right, it is a beautiful thing, more like an illuminated manuscript than a book.
Artemis
Lendemain

With flowers, with women
with absinthe, with fire
we can divert ourselves a little
playing our role in some drama

Absinthe drunk on a winter evening
lights up in green the smoky soul
and the flowers on the well-beloved
exude perfume before the bright fire

Then kisses lose their charms
having lasted a few seasons
reciprocal betrayal means
you leave one day, without tears

You burn letters and bouquets
then the alcove catches fire
and if the sad life is spared
absinthe and hiccups abide

The portraits are eaten by flames
the contorted fingers tremble
you die having long slept
with flowers, with women
Provenance
I quite like that.

I have yet to figure out why every last copy of the Nepenthes Press books haven't yet been purchased. Along with Kirk's spoons (and cane), they are the most beautiful absinthe-related works of art.

Beautifully made absinthe, is of course, itself a work of art.
sbmac
Great stuff Artemis, thanks for posting that.
Kirk
If Nepenthes sells as many books as I sell spoons they should be available for about 20 more years. Not surprising, you can read for free and use a fork for sugar cubes.
G&C
Simple Syrup…
Provenance
…for simple people.
Artemis
QUOTE
thanks for posting that


You're welcome. I wasn't satisfied with the English translations I found during a cursory search, so I did my own, based upon those. I've since changed "indigestion" to "hiccups". I thought it was hiccups on first glance (hoquet - it's pretty intuitive) but I had neglected to put that in. I had actually never seen that poem in any language before our Finny friend brought it up, so thanks to him. I think it's far superior to that Dowson poem.
Artemis
This link was posted elsewhere, and I thought the story was okay:

http://www.france-pittoresque.com/spip.php?article5657

It's about Alexandre Dumas and Armand Montjoye. Montjoye showed up at the house of Dumas and sat at a table silently, smoking, before an overflowing glass "poisoned by the Green Muse". The secretaries fled, and Dumas, who "didn't like to write unless he was surrounded by an entourage", threw down his pen and approached Montjoye.

Montjoye! he exclaimed.
Master?
Let me ask you something.
What?
How many glasses of absinthe have you had today?
I'm on my second glass, answered Montjoye.
You must have a dreadful hunger.
No.
Bah!
I get hungry only after the sixth glass.
Oh goodl! Montjoye, you know something? Dumas went on.
No, said Montjoye mechanically, accustomed to this dictatorship of dialogue.
It is one o'clock, is it not?
One-thirty.
At one glass of absinthe per hour, it will be half past five when you will be hungry.
Precisely.
Then you have four hours before you, and I have four hours before me.
So? Montjoye said complacently .
So! Don't you see where I'm going?
Not yet.
Here: I am going to make dinner for you.

Dumas then spent his hours wringing the necks of chickens, lighting the fire, picking parsely, cooking, etc. and finally presented supper to coincide with Montjoye's sixth glass of absinthe.
Artemis
By the way, Delirium, that's a fine signature line.

Suzuki's "Beginner's Mind" should be required reading in every school on earth.

QUOTE
Treat every moment as your last. It is not preparation for something else.

Shunryu Suzuki
Tibro
Treat every drink as your last. Don't die with shit on your breath.
Bruno Rygseck
Great idea, I wish you good luck!
Artemis
QUOTE
Treat every drink as your last. Don't die with shit on your breath.


That ain't no maxim. It precludes suicide by Czechsinthe.
Tibro
Good buy, crool whirled.
delirium
QUOTE("Kirk")
If Nepenthes sells as many books as I sell spoons they should be available for about 20 more years. Not surprising, you can read for free and use a fork for sugar cubes.


I guess I'm not the only one for whom 200 euros is a bit expensive for a spoon.

QUOTE("Artemis")

By the way, Delirium, that's a fine signature line.


I fell in love with the line immediately as I saw it. (:

QUOTE("Artemis")
This link was posted elsewhere, and I thought the story was okay:


Who has written this? This is a contenporary creation?
Artemis
I didn't see any credits on the page to which I posted the link. I found this elsewhere:

QUOTE
Theodore de Banville tells us in his "Souvenirs" how a poor starving devil, Montjoye by name, was ready to take his life in despair, when the thought of Dumas came to him like an inspiration from heaven. He found the great man deserted — all the servants had gone a-holidaying — but the host hurried into the kitchen, and prepared with his own hands a feast for the gods, for this stranger. It is a pleasant picture that the poet sets before us — the penniless beggar eating, and making witty remarks on the dishes as he attacked them, and Dumas beaming with delight and roaring with laughter, as he heaped the strange guest's plate with good things.


That's an excerpt from The Life and Writings of Alexandre Dumas, by Harry Spurr, published in 1902. It differs somewhat from the piece online, which leads you to believe Dumas and Montjoye were well-acquainted, that Dumas cooked for Montjoye on a regular basis, and that the servants left them alone sometimes, nothing about being on vacation. I like the cold call version better, which means it probably isn't true.

De Banville died in 1891. The original story is apparently from Souvenirs.
Artemis
QUOTE
I guess I'm not the only one for whom 200 euros is a bit expensive for a spoon.


I can't argue, but it's all relative. People spend that much and more for absinthe, and when the absinthe is gone, it's gone. The spoon will (perhaps) be with you the rest of your life, will (no doubt) gain in value, and can be left to your heirs. All of my items from Kirk have already been given to my granddaughters, although they haven't been told about it yet (where is the wink emoticon?).
sbmac
I've even heard of people paying much more for lesser works of art.
delirium
Oh yes I've seen the spoons. They're extraordinary pieces of art. Few months ago I made an investment and bought a bottle of absinthe, fountain, couple of spoons and couple of glasses. It all costed about 200 euros total. Of course I could have bought one spoon.


btw. It's not the spoon that bends, it's your mind!
G&C
If the spoon isn't bending, you're doing it wrong…
delirium
Any idea of the exact sources of the absinthe quotes reputed to Oscar Wilde?
Artemis
Reputed is right. What you always see is "Oscar Wilde was quoted as saying (insert some nonsense)". You never see who quoted him or where Oscar wrote down what he supposedly said.

Our friend Hartsmar has done yeoman's work on this, and has set the record straight, at least to my satisfaction:

http://www.absinthe.se/absinthe-drinkers/oscar-wilde
Kirk
"I guess I'm not the only one for whom 200 euros is a bit expensive for a spoon."
Here you go delerium:

=tags&ga_search_query=absinthe+spoon&ga_search_type=all&ga_facet=]More affordable knock offs
Tibro
That sux. And blows.
sbmac
A disgusting and blatant rip-off of your work Kirk.
Artemis
QUOTE
not reccommended for use as an absinthe spoon due to being fabricated out of copper


Absinthe not green enough for you, just use one of these.
Jaded Prole
Pitiful indeed.
Jay
QUOTE(sbmac @ Feb 29 2012, 06:37 PM) *

A disgusting and blatant rip-off of your work Kirk.

Actually, this one is closer to the mark, but yes, they both exhibit quite a bit of that "sincerest form of flattery."
sbmac
Actually Jay, it is the same woman's work. I sent her a polite message mentioning Kirk's design, and how those in the absinthe community know his work well. She claims never to have seen Kirk's work,
saying it is merely coincidence. The fact that she's willing to make them in silver however pisses me off a bit.
As someone who's had my guitar designs "borrowed" from time to time, I'm pretty sensitive to this kind of thing.
Artemis
Click to view attachment Click to view attachment
Provenance
The public reaction to Kirk's work, for some reason, reminds me of this.
Kirk
A quote from the artist:
QUOTE
This beatuiful hand made sterloing silver spoon is intended for the traditional preparation of absinthe, or as spoon for other uses, as ornate tableware, as giftware or as an objet d'art. I was inspired to make this piece after studying other absinthe spoons and exploring the history and enigma surrounding Absinthe use during the Post-Impressionist period in late 19th century Paris.

It doesn't bother me at all.
Artemis
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M37LF_xGyc0
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