Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: So, did they burned it back then or not?
The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > Absinthe & Absinthiana > General Absinthe Discussion
Habu
A youtube-whisky-guru Ralfy posted his little absinthe review, to which I replied with an argument, that there is no evidence of the fire ritual in the time of Belle Epoque.

The response:

QUOTE(Ralfy)
Just my personal perspective! And the flaming of the sugar cubes has been a long-time activity which allows the proofing and increased 'presentation' of inferior absinthe which might have been dilute industrial solvent, sulphuric acid and copper sulphate for colour.
If the flame burned green, toxic copper sulphate was in the drink and the drinker was warned by the flame!


So, did the absinthe drinkers set their absinthe on fire to proof, if there's anything poisonous in it?

I wonder. blink.gif

Oh yeah, here's the vid:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YTvx11Fsq9g
absinthion
As Ralfy said, it is his personal perspective, which he clearly pulled out of his ass. You have to lit the copper sulphate in order to get a green flame, so burning sugar on a spoon over the glass wouldn't do much. Fun fact: Ralfy uses a cake shovel as absinthe spoon.
thegreenimp
Tell Ralfy to pick up his Winston™.

Click to view attachment
Stroller
He reminds me of another Ralph.

Click to view attachment
Greytail
QUOTE(absinthion @ Sep 2 2012, 06:10 AM) *

As Ralfy said, it is his personal perspective, which he clearly pulled out of his ass. You have to lit the copper sulphate in order to get a green flame, so burning sugar on a spoon over the glass wouldn't do much. Fun fact: Ralfy uses a cake shovel as absinthe spoon.



While I don't agree with his assessments, more than likely he poured the absinthe over the sugar cubes while filling the glass. Sugar is not that combustable to burn with a blue flame. Only alcohol.
thegreenimp
They've both eaten too much paste.
Tibro
Thuyone paste, at that.
Artemis
QUOTE
the drinker was warned by the flame

My guess is that drinkers didn't drink that crap because they liked it better than Pernod, they drank it because it was what they could afford. Warnings of any kind didn't mean much to them, and they weren't going to waste alcohol by burning it anyway.
Greytail
I agree with you, but it would be the other crowd that had money which would have been doing the flame test. That's the implications I got from what Ralfy said regardless of whether or not there is any truth to it.
Tibro
Ralfy shoves canaries up his ass to see if it's safe for his head.
Artemis
QUOTE
I agree with you, but it would be the other crowd that had money which would have been doing the flame test. That's the implications I got from what Ralfy said regardless of whether or not there is any truth to it.


You're right. I didn't think that through. But now that I have, I think the crowd with money knew what they were getting without testing it. Possibly they could be fooled by a fake Pernod label, but the fire test doesn't pass the smell test in any case for me.
Greytail
Yeah. I also bet it was harder to counterfiet a top brand label like Pernod Fils for example.



Do you mean the African barn canary?
absinthion
Here is a video clip of copper sulphate diluted in alcohol

Copper sulphate is bright blue, so it can only used to be in small amounts. I could be wrong, but I think if diluted in absinthe there wouldn't enough copper sulphate be absorbed by the sugar to create a noticeable green flame.

And yes, I agree with Artemis that the ones who bought the cheap crap probably could care less with safety tests, and the rich ones wouldn't want to be caught with litting up a good absinthe.
L'Assommoir
[quote name='Habu' date='Sep 2 2012, 05:30 AM' post='198919']
A youtube-whisky-guru Ralfy

He is now unguru-ed .
dr_ordinaire
There must be a name for this logical fallacy:


Burning absinthe-soaked sugar would have detected impurities.

THEREFORE

Absinthe drinkers 100 years ago burned absinthe-soaked sugar.


As in deducing a never-before-mentioned historical fact from an unproven possibility?
sbmac
I'm just pleased to see Mrs. Doubtfire (sic) with her own show again.
SethP
Also.
If I was a café proprietor back then (say 1860 - 1915 in France) I would most definately bounce and also probably ban anyone who lit fire to alcohol at my establishment.
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2018 Invision Power Services, Inc.