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The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > The Monkey Hole > The Cellar
Provenance
A rather limited listing compared with more convenient establishments, http://jackrosediningsaloon.com/rooms/whiskey-cellar/

On the other hand, if you choose to visit the People's Republic you probably take what you can get.
Hillbilly
Beer Spirits ??

What is this thing I have never heard of?

Are they any good? Hard to come by?
Artemis
Schenkerla and Aventinus are fine beers, no need for further processing.
But technically all whiskey starts with beer (fermented grain in water) of some sort.
The only difference here is that they started with finished beer, so the liquor is going to have hops in it, not necessarily a bad thing.
Schenkerla is smoked (maybe not all of it, but they're known for that) and Aventinus makes a wheat beer with a typical German wheat beer profile (clove / bubblegum).


Hillbilly
Beer concentrate? Like frozen O.J. in a can?
Tibro
"Rauch" means smoked, in German, so the Schlenkerla offerings are distilled from smoked beer. But then, if they have any non-smoked beers I missed them when I was there. As I missed these beer spirits (beer brandy, bierbrand, bier schnapps, eau-de-vie de bière, pivní pálenka) as well. Reason enough to go back. I love beer spirits. They fill the void when the void isn't big enough to contain the heft and volume of beer. It won't make you *Belch*. Although I'd be curious to see what varieties might be found in Belgium.
Jaded Prole
I recall tasting a beer spirit in Allentown; more like a brandy than a whiskey as I recall, mild tasting and floral. No hops in evidence.
Tibro
The part of the hop plant which is used to flavor beer is the flowers. Many hop varieties impart floral notes. Many floral notes carry over well during distillation. Many bitter notes do not. (But you knew that.)

Beer brandy derives from grain, most often malted barley such as what is used for whisky. But it's a white dog, without all the heavy wooden notes of barrel aging. And softened by the infusion of an herbal floral quality. Well distilled it's not harsh like the idea some have of unaged whisky. On the one hand, barrel aging smoothes whisky, but it also adds tons of flavors post distillation. Eau-de-vie de bière to my palate has little in common with any fruit eau-de-vie I've ever tried. Beer schnapps reminds me of nothing else so much as it reminds me of beer. I'd be curious to try one that's been barrel aged. I may have to find some oak chips.
Jaded Prole
I prefer it to drinking undistilled mash. I never would have associated the sample I had with beer and was surprised to find out what it was but I certainly liked it. What beer is most often distilled in Bohemia?
OCvertDe
I got a bottle of White Dog™ once. I enjoyed the first sip quite a bit more than the last.
Tibro
Lager is the default beer in Bohemia, as it is by-and-large in Germany (and most other places, generally speaking, as far as it's the German idea that's responsible for its popularity). Produce a lot of beer and some of it is bound to wind up in the still. I'm surprised it hasn't made more of an inroad with the craft movement(s).
Tibro
White dog with that Amerikan penchant for corn is usually a bit of a different animal. The second product listed in that article is straight-up beer spirits, though. Probably calling it what it is isn't a good marketing technique in Amerika.
OCvertDe
Dunno. Mine was of the Buffalo Trace origin. Not bad I suppose, not really my thing though.
Artemis
Actually, the part of the hop used in beer is a strobile, more like a pine cone than a flower.
I remember something at Allentown labeled (actually, written on the bottle with a Sharpie) "the shit nobody will drink" or some such, but maybe that wasn't the beer spirit.
Artemis
QUOTE
Beer concentrate? Like frozen O.J. in a can?

In the sense that distillation removes water, yes.

Jaded Prole
QUOTE
I'm surprised it hasn't made more of an inroad with the craft movement(s).


Hmmm, lot of local craft breweries in Xit City, maybe I can introduce them to the concept . . .
Tibro
QUOTE
a strobile, more like a pine cone than a flower.

Like a pine cone in structure, without being woody, so more like a flower in texture. In either case, you'll find them commonly referred to as the female flowers of the hop plant. They're sex organs.

QUOTE
I remember something at Allentown

Sounds like you may not have actually been there.
Tibro
QUOTE
QUOTE
Beer concentrate? Like frozen O.J. in a can?

In the sense that distillation removes water, yes.

I'm inclined to think of eisbock or ice beer as being more in the mode of froze concentrate. With the pulp or headache, as it were. Distillation helps removes the stuff that might get uncomfortably stuck in your cranial spaces, as it were. I 'spose it's a question of the states of your matters when you do the concentrating.
Provenance
I like beer schnaps although it may be the only style of spirits that hasn't caught on with craft distillers. There may not be much of a market here as its easy to get confused with all of the unaged corn lickers. There's a local bar that carries a few, they are quite pricey.
Artemis
QUOTE
I'm inclined to think of eisbock or ice beer as being more in the mode of froze concentrate.

Indeed, but I was thinking about the word concentrate. The alcohol is concentrated using a still, but only because the water is removed. Water is removed to concentrate orange juice as well. Same for malt extract, condensed milk, etc. So I said in that sense ...
QUOTE
Distillation helps removes the stuff that might get uncomfortably stuck in your cranial spaces, as it were.

Indeed. It removes stuff soluble in water, and concentrates stuff soluble in alcohol, which is why absinthe is only partially like wormwood, why maceration (coloration) lends attributes that distilling won't, and why homebrew absinthe kits sold to morons for soaking in vodka only result in vomiting. But you knew all this; all this discussion is just for shits and giggles.
QUOTE
Like a pine cone in structure, without being woody, so more like a flower in texture.

I meant like a pine cone in function, which is (I think) how botanists classify such things. They're woody if you consider paper thin wood shavings, as from a plane set to remove almost nothing. I always thought of them as feathery. They remind me of owls. Fragrant, sticky owls.
Tibro
Pine cones produce seeds. Strobiles produce seeds. Flowers produce seeds. Ears of corn are spikes studded by seeds. Some catkins produce seeds, others pollen. All are performing the function we commonly attribute to flowers (other than looking pretty and being odiferous) . I believe, and I'm no botantist, that the different terms refer primarily to structure rather than function.

And as an inveterate flower eater, I can tell you that many flowers have petals that are surprisingly tough. We may think of them as delicate and ephemeral, but for the most part they're surprisingly tough. Plucking them from a daisy they don't usually rip but come out whole from their anchor points. Cellose, with a high tensile strength, same as in wood.

And I'm quite enamored of the image of hop flowers strobiles as sticky, fragrant owls. I'll have to get some bobble eyes and do a Marfa Stewdfart project.
Artemis
QUOTE
I believe, and I'm no botantist, that the different terms refer primarily to structure rather than function.

Structure, yes, agreed, as far as what the word strobile means (a cone, more or less). But I meant function in the sense that it's a fruit, a seed-bearing thing, a ripened thing, something that is past flowering stage. I'm no Jethro Tull, but I think of flowers functioning to attract pollinators, and cones to protect and drop seeds (obviously, post-pollination)
EDIT: A little research (very little) reveals that hops, like cannabis, come in male and female, and the cones appear on the female plants, like the buds on cannabis. The male plants are culled in both agricultures because seeds are not desirable in the harvested fruit. And apparently hops cones are both the flower and the seed package, or would be, if the boys were left around to play their part.
I look forward to a bohemian rhapsody of owl caricatures.
IPB ImageIPB Image
Artemis
Duplicate post culled without mercy.
Tibro
I take no credit, only to show you are not alone in your perception.

IPB Image
Artemis
Now that's an owl glass.
Toes are wrong, though.
People probably think it's more owly to show more claws, but owls put three toes forward only in flight. When sitting still, they put two forward and two backward as in the photo.
When I was a teenager I shot one and carried it home. Yeah, I know, stupid, but I was stupider then. For what it's worth, I wanted to taxiderm him. And did. I also stuffed a hummingbird that my cat killed.
But anyway, a friend was checking him out on the floor of the shed, poking him, and the owl came to life (turned out my bullet had only grazed him) and gave him a taste of the Freddy Krueger appendages.
Jack Batemaster
C'est la chouette !
Tibro
I think the 3 toes is a design compromise. Those talons are a reflection of the strobile's pistils. And pretty damn clever for it. But only two gives the figure a Chaplinesque posture. Well, that's how I see it.

Night Shift Brewing
Artemis
Agreed on all counts, but three claws on each side doesn't look right either - it's like an owl sitting on centipedes.
Mickey Mouse has only four fingers. I've read that it saved money to leave one out, but I think it's bullshit. How much longer does it take a skilled artist to make another loop with his pen? I think it's because five fingers looks like a bunch of bananas unless an actual human hand is rendered accurately, and that would take a lot of time, not to mention make the mouse look weird. Same for Homer Simpson.
Artemis
Speaking of Charlie, I didn't know until recently that he had appeared in and directed non-silent movies.
Saw one the other night, with him as a serial killer.
He walked to the guillotine normally, but with a limp.
Tibro
Power to the people.
Kirk
What a dreamer, sadly, not a prophet. I camp with the tramp.
Artemis
Don't know how I missed that.
The movie I saw was the Bluebeard story, but Charlie had turned it into a comedy, trying to poison women, almost poisoning himself, slapstick, etc. but in the end when he was in jail and awaiting execution it was deadly serious; he refused confession to the priest and showed no remorse. It was a little unsettling.
It reminded me of the Seinfeld espisode wherein Kramer went to Hollywood and met an ancient silent film star who told him about the movie she was in with the Three Stooges, who were wrongly accused of kidnapping a baby, sent to prison and executed. The look of shock Kramer's face was priceless - all he could say was "that was an unusual turn for the Stooges ... ".
Kirk
I have some antique bottles, sealed and full, but the only way I know to tell if they are worth anything is to drink them, all from the late fifties; Prinz rare and fine german brandy, Moquin brandy, st remy extra fine napoleon, ancient age 10 year bourbon, king william vop scotch. and a bottle of tangueray gin with the charles tanguery tag on it. Also 2 bottles of chateau couronne cru exceptional, 1970 and 2 of lynch bages, grand cru, same year, good storage and good appearance. Does any of that sound interesting to anyone?
Kirk
I cracked open the Prinz German brandy and the stuff is tasty as all get out. An old bottle of J Dantz whiskey tasted pretty good too. At 45 years old on the red wine I don't think I'll bother opening it, looks pretty though.
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