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The Fée Verte Absinthe Forum - The Oldest, Largest, Most Authoritative Absinthe Forum. > Absinthe & Absinthiana > Absinthe History
Artemis
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It's a story with a lot of words, but basically, in 1902 a man built a bar/health spa at Malzéville.
He commissioned stained glass panels by Henri Bergé that showed products offered for sale at the establishment, one of which was Cusenier absinthe. Another was milk. He was out of business by 1909.
The glass panels were eventually vandalized and taken down, although the building is apparently still in existence, with replica panels (I'm not clear on this - hopefully Marc will add some comments when he gets around to it).

A member of the French forum, "Absenta", located and obtained the artist's model for one of the panels. It's now in his private bar.

http://www.museeabsinthe.com/forums/index....ost&p=71971



Artemis
The flowers at the top corners (thistles) are symbolic of Lorraine.

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Artemis
For sale here - St. Hubert's milk

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Artemis
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Henri Bergé

http://www.ecole-de-nancy.com/web/index.ph...=henri-berge-en

The Cure d'Air de Malzéville was the health spa.
Kirk
I believe Emile Galle made glass in Daum Nancy also, some of the best glass of the period come from Nancy.
Artemis
Yep. His name is on the top of that Ecole de Nancy web page, along with Bergé.
It's stunning to think that this thing was advertising.
Look at the trash we have for ads today.
How low we have sunk.



Kirk
I've rescued a few pieces of Galle.
Artemis
You've rescued a lot of things abs-cheers.gif
Some of Kirk's glass objects

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Artemis
Correction on the stained glass panel in France - it's destined for Absenta's attic bar, but it's on a train somewhere in France. Today he talked about hopping trains to get his hands on it. Apparently nobody knows for sure what happened to the panels that were in the bar. What was left of them were taken down, supposedly for restoration, quite a few years ago. There is speculation that they may be stored in a museum in Nancy.
Marc
Here is a summary that I did from Patrick's story.

A bit of history:

Mr Louis Royer created a big café-restaurant for the bourgeoisie in 1902 in Malzéville, with walking paths and games in the park. The place - called "Cure d'Air du Trianon" - became quickly popular.

The café-restaurant had 22 big advertising stained-glasses which were designed like posters. All of them (except one advertising playing cards) were advertising drinks sold there: Cointreau, rum, vermouth, cognac, champagne, absinthe, milk, water, etc. Most of them were showing a woman and were inspired by Toulouse Lautrec works.

These stained-glasses were all made by Henri Bergé (1870-1937), a famous artist who also worked for Daum - the renowned crystal factory based in Nancy - in which he was a key contributor.

But in 1907, because of financial issues, the café-restaurant was converted into a convalescent home. It then sold in 1909 to a building contractor and thus stopped being a public place.

The building is now in bad condition following vandalism and bad weather. The 18 surviving stained-glasses were removed in 1993 for restoration and are now stored in a museum. The 3 stained-glasses exposed nowadays are reproductions (see photos in the comments below).

The stained-glass in Patrick’s collection:

It is most likely an artist's model for a larger piece, made by Henri Bergé himself. Back then, the stained-glass makers were making small-scale versions (1/5 or 1/10) of the artwork for their customers before making the full-size versions.
The large version from the Cure d'Air du Trianon was approximately 2.50x3 meters (8.2x9.8 feet), the one Patrick owns is 73x69 cm (29x27 inches) but still weights 7.2 Kg (15.8 lbs).

Cure d'Air du Trianon back then:

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Cure d'Air du Trianon now:

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The stained-glass in Patrick's collection :

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Another absinthe advertising stained-glass was in this café-restaurant but it's now in bad condition, it advertises Absinthe Gustave Dechanet Fils:

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Artemis
Thank you, Marc.
I wonder if either of the absinthe panels were among those rescued.
It would seem that only one artist's model would have been necessary, thus the one Patrick obtained may be the only one that ever existed.
The full-sized panels must have been very heavy indeed.
It may be worth mentioning here, Patrick's proposal for visitors to his attic, subject of course to his approval.
Marc
Here is the list of the 18 surviving panels now stored in a museum in Nancy:

LA GRANDE MAXEVILLE : panel 1
BIERE BRUNE : panel 2
COINTREAU & GUIGNOLET D'ANGERS : panel 3
RHUM ST JAMES P. LAMBERT : panel 4
VERMOUTH ALLI(…) TORINO : panel 6
LAIT ST HUBERT NANCY : panel 7
CASSIS GRANDEUR DE BOURGOGNE HERITIER GUYOT DIJON : panel 8
SUC BOURGUIGNON : panel 9
ST RAPHAËL QUINQUINA : panel 10
ABSINTHE OXYGENEE CUSENIER : panel 11
CARTES A JOUER GRIMAUD : panel 12
VICHY QUINA(…) VICHY : panel 13
CHAMPAGNE CANARD DUCHENE LUDES REIMS : panel 17
BYRRH VIOLET FRERES VIN GENEREUX ET QUINQUINA : panel 18
GRANDE FINE CHAMPAGNE (…) COGNAC : panel 19
FRUITS AU JUS MICHEL BRUNIER ET FRERES L(…) : panel 20
CHAMBERY RICHARD TOUSSAINT L'HUILLIER DEPOSITAIRE : panel 21
ABSINTHE GUSTAVE DECHANET FILS : panel 22
Jack Batemaster
La bière brune est délicieuse.
Bruno Rygseck
Thanks for posting this.

I searched for 'Suc Bourguignon' and found something interesting:

La distillerie Simon Aîné à Chalon sur Saône

Absinthe is mentioned there, but Google translate does not produce very readable text…

L'Assommoir
[quote name='Bruno Rygseck' date='Jan 6 2015, 03:23 PM' post='210493']

La distillerie Simon Aîné à Chalon sur Saône
Absinthe is mentioned there

hmmmm
Il ne reste plus à la famille que la marque et les "secrets" de fabrication (ils sont pieusement conservés par un cousin) qui pourraient peut-être un jour, qui sait, redonner vie à ces merveilles qu'étaient les liqueurs Simon-Aîné.
Artemis
QUOTE(Bruno Rygseck @ Jan 6 2015, 11:23 PM) *
Absinthe is mentioned there, but Google translate does not produce very readable text…


Absinthe is mentioned only in passing, and is not the subject of the page. The page is by a person named Simon who has fond memories of summers spent at the house of his grandparents near the Simon Aîné distillery. He mentions the smell of blackcurrants and macerating oranges in the gardens around the distillery. He talks about his family ancestry and that of the founders of the distillery. It's not clear to me whether said ancestry is the same.

Absinthe is mentioned as follows:

I therefore know very little about him (Jean Francois Simon) and even less about what led him to become a distiller. He seems not to have had family ties with this SIMON - ELDER who had set up in 1833, in association with Augustus JULLIEN, a distillery of absinthe in Pontarlier on the site of the ancient convent of the Bernardines, under the name "Fabrique d'Absynthe du Roi".

House of Pains-Fils also had a specialty called "The Grand Som" (from the name of a peak in the Chartreuse mountains) in three versions: green, yellow and white. And they also made absinthe there.

The distillery Simon-Aîné de Chalon-sur-Saône therefore appears to be a continuation of an older distillery which all the commercial papers indicate was founded in1862. This distillery was presented at its beginning as principally a producer of absinthe. See below a bill signed F. Simon Aîné, of November 19th, 1892 that complains about a shipment of two bales of fennel - used in the manufacture of absinthe - which were claimed to be of bad quality. I had the opportunity myself to taste a bottle of Simon-Aîné absinthe found in the bottom of my grandfather's cellar, according to the rules (traditional absinthe ritual) using the special spoon called "feuille ou pelle d'absinthe" with a lump of sugar on it.

(Caption) - An "wormwood leaf" spoon that was probably used for serving the products of Simon Aîné at Chalon

An older bill from 1884 mentions "Distillery of Swiss Absinthe" a generic term, absinthe being undoubtedly a Swiss creation.

A very old advertisement for the house of SIMON AÎNÉ (from 1882 according to the seller on eBay) which I acquired, gives as the address for the distillery 5, Rue des Lancharres and 9, Rue de Lyon (where were born three of the children of Jean-François). It is therefore probable that it was at the intersection of these two streets, before the construction of the plant and the home which I knew. It is amusing to note that it offers a "a perfect Swiss absinthe extract".


Marc
Very interesting, thanks Bruno.

He also says: "I've had the opportunity to taste a bottle of absinthe Simon-Aîné found in my grandfather cellar" but that's all he says about it.

Have you noticed this?

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Artemis
Thanks, Marc. I had missed the part about tasting the absinthe because I searched the text for "absinthe" and for some reason "l'absinthe" didn't come up. After your response at the French forum I amended my post above to include that part.
Jack Batemaster
Mais où sont les bières brunes ???
Artemis
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Artemis
Clarification:
After reading parts of that web page that I had not bothered to read the first time or two around (too many words), I realize that the Simon who created the page is indeed a direct descendant of the Simons involved with the distillery.
Bruno Rygseck
Thanks, Marc and Artemis, and a brown bear to jacques!


Artemis
You're welcome. Thanks for the link. Fascinating page. I hope to study it more closely - lots of great images.

As for the quote Assomoir posted, it means basically (I think) that a cousin in the Simon family has the secret recipes and maybe some day the products of the distillery could be again produced.

But as we know, there's a lot more to it than a recipe.

Jack Batemaster
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Artemis
I think there's a bear in that bush.
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